Dr. Yuan-Ling Chao

Professor | Director, Undergraduate Program

Dr. Yuan-Ling Chao
615-898-2629
Room 265, Peck Hall (PH)
MTSU Box 23, Murfreesboro, TN 37132
Office Hours

Spring 2017

MW 10:30-11:30 a.m.

TR   11:15 a.m.-1:00 p.m.; 2:30-3:30 p.m.

and by appointment

Degree Information

  • Ph.D., University of California, LA (1995)
  • M.A., University of California (1983)
  • B.A., Hong Kong Baptist College (1981)

Areas of Expertise

History of Medicine
Late Imperial China

Biography

Credentials

Ph.D. in History, University of California, Los Angeles, 1995

Dissertation:”Medicine and Society in Late Imperial China: A Study of Physicians in Suzhou.”  

M.A. in History, University of California, Santa Barbara, 1983   

                      Concentration in Premodern China and Japan  ...

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Credentials

Ph.D. in History, University of California, Los Angeles, 1995

Dissertation:”Medicine and Society in Late Imperial China: A Study of Physicians in Suzhou.”  

M.A. in History, University of California, Santa Barbara, 1983   

                      Concentration in Premodern China and Japan  

B.A. in History with Honors, Hong Kong Baptist College, 1981   

 

Certificate, Inter-University Center for Japanese Language Studies (Stanford Center), Tokyo (1984)
 
 
 
 

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Publications

Selected Publications

Book:

Medicine and Society in Late Imperial China: A Study of Physicians in Suzhou, 1600-1850. NY: Peter Lang Publishing, 2009.

Articles:

"Medicine and the Law in Late Imperial China: Cases from the Xing'an huilan (Conspectus of Penal Cases" in Chinese Historical Review 24, no. 1 (Spring 2017): 58-76.

"Know...

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Selected Publications

Book:

Medicine and Society in Late Imperial China: A Study of Physicians in Suzhou, 1600-1850. NY: Peter Lang Publishing, 2009.

Articles:

"Medicine and the Law in Late Imperial China: Cases from the Xing'an huilan (Conspectus of Penal Cases" in Chinese Historical Review 24, no. 1 (Spring 2017): 58-76.

"Knowledge to Practice: Scholars, Physicians, and Common Folks in Late Imperial China: A Symposium in Honor of Benjamin A. Elman" in Chinese Historical Review 24, no. 1 (Spring 2017): 1-4.

“The Pi and Wei in the Inner Bodily Landscape in Late Imperial Jiangnan: The Fashioning of Ye Gui,” in Pingyi Chu ed. Medicine and Hygiene: Some New Perspectives (Taipei: Academia Sinica, 2013), pp. 157-191.

“Poetry and Footbinding: Teaching Women and Gender Relations in Traditional China” in World History Connected, Vol. 6 No. 2 (June 2009)

 "The Ideal Physician in Late Imperial China: The Question of sanshi (three generations)." East Asian Science, Technology, and Medicine, no. 17 (2000): 66-93. 

Reviews

Review of Health and Hygiene in Chinese East Asia: Policies and Publics in the Long Twentieth Century ed. by Angela Ki Che Leung and Charlotte Furth (Durham: Duke University Press, 2010) in the Bulletin of the History of Medicine, vol. 86 no. 1 (Spring 2012): 131-133.  

Review Essay of Li Jianmin ed. Zhong yiliao kan Zhongguo shi (Examining Chinese History   Through Medicine) in East Asian Science, Technology and Society: An International            Journal, vol. 4, no. 2 (2010): 349-353. Through Medicine) in East Asian Science, Technology and Society: An International Journal, vol. 4, no. 2 (2010): 349-353.

Review of H.T. Huang, Science and Civilisation in China Volume 6: Biology and Biological Technology. Part V: Fermentations and Food Science. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001 in Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences, 57.3 (2002) 351-353.

Review of Joseph Needham, with the collaboration of Lu Gwei-Djen and edited by Nathan Sivin. Science and Civilisation in China. Volume 6, Biology and Biological  Technology, Part VI. Medicine.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000 in Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences, 57.1 (2002): 95-97.

Review of P.Y. Ho and F.P. Lisowski,  A Brief History of Chinese Medicine and Its Influence, 2nd ed.  in East Asian Science, no. 17 (2001).   Review of Carol Benedict, Bubonic Plague in Nineteenth Century China.  Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1996 in Jindai Zhongguoshi Yanjiu Tongxun (Newsletter for Modern Chinese History), Number 26 , 1998. (In Chinese)   Review of East Asian Science: Tradition and Beyond. Edited by Hashimoto KeizÇ, Catherine Jami, and Lowell Skar. Osaka: Kansai University Press, 1995 in Chinese Science, no. 13, 1996.

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Presentations

“History of Medicine: Past Research and New Trends.” Paper presented at the conference “Chinese History in Global World: An International conference on New Approaches to Chinese Historical Studies,”  June 6-8, 2014 at East China Normal University, Shanghai, China.

  “The Pi and Wei in the Inner Bodily Landscape in Late Imperial Jiangnan: A Preliminary Study of Ye Tianshi’s Theory of Weiyin” at The Fourth Internationa...

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“History of Medicine: Past Research and New Trends.” Paper presented at the conference “Chinese History in Global World: An International conference on New Approaches to Chinese Historical Studies,”  June 6-8, 2014 at East China Normal University, Shanghai, China.

  “The Pi and Wei in the Inner Bodily Landscape in Late Imperial Jiangnan: A Preliminary Study of Ye Tianshi’s Theory of Weiyin” at The Fourth International Conference on Sinology, June 20-22, 2012 Academia Sinica, Taiwan.  

“Physicians Becoming Gods: the ritual representation of physicians in the Sanhuang miao and Yaowang miao” presented at the Association for Asian Studies annual conference, March 31-April 3, 2011 in Honolulu, Hawaii. This is the annual conference of the Association for Asian Studies, a national organization of Asian Studies.  

“The Growing Importance of wei in the Qing wenbing school: Ye Gui and his theory of weiyin” at the Association for Asian Studies annual conference, March 25-28, 2010 in Philadelphia.  Panel  “Tradition and Renewal: Chinese Medical History” This is the annual conference of the Association for Asian Studies, a national organization of Asian Studies. 

 “Ordering the Inner Landscape: Acupuncture and the Body” Presentation at the 12th International Conference on the History of Science in East Asia, July 14-18, 2008 at Johns Hopkins University.  This is an international conference of the International Society for the History of  East Asian Science, Technology, and Medicine (ISHEASTM).  Its membership consists of top scholars in the field from Europe, Japan, US, China, Korea, Southeast Asia, Australia, and Taiwan.  The conference is held every three years around the world.  

 Rationalizing the Body: Government and Medicine in the Song Dynasty, 960-1279) to be presented at the Southern Conference in the History of Medicine, Science, and Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia, April 11-13, 2008.

 The Body Landscape in Traditional Chinese Medical Texts” Presented at the Princeton University Library. August 4, 2006.

  “Acupuncture and the Body: Bronze Figures in the Song Dynasty (960-1279).” Presented at the Southeast Conference of the Association of Asian Studies.  Atlanta, GA  January 20-22, 2006. 

  “Lineages and Schools: Zhang Zhongjing and Sidajia in Ming and Qing.”  Presented at the 10th International Conference on the History of Science in East Asia, Shanghai August 20-24, 2002.

  “Zhang Zhongjing as ‘Medical Sage’ (yisheng) in Traditional Chinese Medicine.” Presented at the 9th International Conference on the History of Science in China, Hong Kong, October 9-12, 2001.

  “The Identity of Physicians in Late Imperial China: Professionals?” Presented at the annual meeting of the Society for the Social History of Medicine, July 16-18, 1999 at the University of Glasgow, Scotland.  

“Medicine and the Law in Late Imperial China.” Presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for the History of Medicine, May 6-9, 1999 at New Brunswick, NJ.

  “The Question of ‘sanshi’ (Three Generations) in Traditional Chinese Medicine.”  Presented at UCLA’s Workshop on New Directions in the History of Chinese Science, May 24, 1997.  

“Knowledge and Experience in Traditional Chinese Medicine: The Question of Sanshi (Three Generations).”  Presented at the Association for Asian Studies Conference, March 13-16, 1997 at Chicago.

  “Patronizing Medicine: The Sanhuang miao (Temple of the Three Emperors) in Late Imperial China.”   Presented at the American Historical Association Conference, January 2-5, 1997 at New York.

  “Confucian or Artisan? Discussions on Medical Ethics in Late Imperial China.” Paper presented at the 1994 California Chinese History Graduate Student Conference at Stanford University, May 13-14, 1994.

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Research/Scholarly Activity

Works in Progress
 
A project on examining the changing perceptions of the inner bodily landscape in late imperial China, connections to the geographical and disease landscape.

Courses

Undergraduate Courses Taught
History 1110, World Civilizations to 1500
History 1120, World Civilizations since 1500

History 3010, Historian's Craft
History 3070, Topics in World History:

                     Revolutions in China

                 &n...

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Undergraduate Courses Taught
History 1110, World Civilizations to 1500
History 1120, World Civilizations since 1500

History 3010, Historian's Craft
History 3070, Topics in World History:

                     Revolutions in China

                     Monk and Warriors:Religious and Secular Worlds in East                       
History 4450, History of Japan
History 4460, History of China
History 4410, History of Medicine
History 4810, History of Women in the Third World: Women in China

Graduate Courses Taught
History 6305, Research Seminar in Global History

History 6304,  Reading Seminar in Global History

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