Course Descriptions

Click the course number for the current catalog description.

ABAS
Geosciences Only

5340 Soil Formation and Remediation: (click for catalog description)
Three credits. Course rotation: TBD (as of 10/2013)

5350 Soil Survey and Land Use: (click for catalog description)
Three credits. Course rotation: TBD (as of 10/2013)

ACSI
Actuarial Sciences Only

5140 Mathematical Foundations of Actuarial Science: (click for catalog description)
Three credits.  Course rotation: Spring (as of 10/2013)

5200 Introduction to Mathematics of Investment: (click for catalog description)
Three credits. Course rotation: Fall, Spring (as of 10/2013)

5220 Mathematics of Corporation Finance: (click for catalog description)
Three credits. Course rotation: Spring (as of 10/2013)

5230 Mathematics of Compound Interest: (click for catalog description)
Three credits. Course rotation: Fall (as of 10/2013)

5240 Mathematics of Interest Theory, Economics, and Finance: (click for catalog description)
Three credits. Course rotation: Spring (as of 10/2013)

5330 Actuarial Mathematics I: (click for catalog description)
Three credits. Course rotation: Fall, Spring (as of 10/2013)

5340 Actuarial Mathematics II: (click for catalog description)
Three credits. Course rotation: TBD (as of 10/2013)

5600 Problems in Actuarial Science: (click for catalog description)
One to six credits. Course rotation: TBD (as of 10/2013)

5630 Mathematics of Risk Management: (click for catalog description)
Three credits. Course rotation: Fall (as of 10/2013)

5640 Mathematics of Options, Futures, and Other Derivatives: (click for catalog description)
Three credits. Course rotation: Spring (as of 10/2013)

6010 Credibility Theory and Loss Distributions: (click for catalog description)
Three credits. Course rotation: Fall (as of 10/2013)

6020 Construction and Evaluation of Actuarial Models: (click for catalog description)
Three credits. Course rotation: Spring (as of 10/2013)

6030 Actuarial Models for Life Contingencies: (click for catalog description)
Three credits. Course rotation: Fall (as of 10/2013)

6040 Actuarial Models for Financial Economics: (click for catalog description)
Three credits. Course rotation: Spring (as of 10/2013)

ACTG
All programs

6100 Accounting and Legal Issues for Managers(click for catalog description)
Three credits. Course rotation: Spring, Summer (as of 10/2013)

BCEN
All programs

6820 Managerial Communication: (click for catalog description)
Three credits. Course rotation: Fall, Spring, Summer (as of 10/2013)

6910 Internship Program: (click for catalog description)
Three credits. Must be approved in preceding semester. For details, go to www.mtsu.edu/msps/forms.php. Course rotation: Fall, Spring, Summer (as of 10/2013)

BIOL
Biotechnology Only

5460 Human Genetics Lecture: (click for catalog description)
Three credits. Co-listed with BIOL 5461. Course rotation: TBD (as of 10/2013)

5461 Human Genetics Lab: (click for catalog description)
Zero credits. Co-listed with BIOL 5460. Course rotation: TBD (as of 10/2013)

5510 Food/Industrial Microbiology: (click for catalog description)
Four credits. Course rotation: TBD (as of 10/2013)

5550 Biotechnology: (click for catalog description)
Three credits. Course rotation: TBD (as of 10/2013)

6350/6351 Biostatistical Analysis Lecture/Lab:

  Four credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 3250/3251. Intermediate-level introduction to biostatistical procedures used in research. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory.

(click for catalog description)

6380/6381 Experimental Immunology Lecture/Lab:

  Four credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 2230/2231. Mechanisms of immunity including the more recent developments in immunology. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory.

(click for catalog description)

6390/6391 Advanced Cell and Molecular Biology Lecture/Lab:

  Four credits. Prerequisites: BIOL 2230/2231, 3250/3251; CHEM 2030/2031 or 3010/3011. Molecular biology of the cell with emphasis on current experi¬≠mental techniques. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory.

(click for catalog description)

6410 Advanced Transmitting Electron Microscopy: (click for catalog description)
Four credits. Course rotation: TBD (as of 10/2013)

6430 Clinical and Pathogenic Microbiology: (click for catalog description)
Four credits. Course rotation: TBD (as of 10/2013)

6440 Advanced Virology: (click for catalog description)
Four credits. Course rotation: TBD (as of 10/2013)

6450 Advancements in Molecular Genetics: (click for catalog description)
Four credits. Course rotation: TBD (as of 10/2013)

6500 Special Problems in Biology: (click for catalog description)
Four credits. Course rotation: TBD (as of 10/2013)

6590 Environmental Toxicology: (click for catalog description)
Four credits. Course rotation: TBD (as of 10/2013)

6650 Seminar: (click for catalog description)
One credit. Course rotation: TBD (as of 10/2013)

6660 Seminar: (click for catalog description)
Two credits. Course rotation: TBD (as of 10/2013)

6720/6721 Advanced Animal Development Lecture/Lab. Four credits. Prerequisites: BIOL 3250/3251; BIOL 4210/4211 or 6390/6391 recommended. Processes and underlying molecular mechanisms by which a single fertilized egg develops into an adult organism. Focuses on vertebrate development, including insights gained from other model organisms. Three hours lecture and two hours lab.

(click for catalog description)

6730 Advanced Microbial Physiology and Biochemistry: (click for catalog description)
Four credits. Course rotation: TBD (as of 10/2013)

6750 Advanced Plant Biotechnology: (click for catalog description)
Four credits. Course rotation: TBD (as of 10/2013)

6760 Bioinformatics: (click for catalog description)
Four credits. Course rotation: TBD (as of 10/2013)

6770 Issues in Biotechnology: (click for catalog description)
Two credits. Course rotation: TBD (as of 10/2013)

CHEM
Biotechnology Only

6510 Biochemistry II. Three credits. Prerequisite: CHEM 5500. The structure of lipids, amino acids, nucleotides, and nucleic acids and their metabolism at a molecular level. Emphasis on understanding the chemical basis of biological phenomena. Offered every spring.

(click for catalog description)

6530 Biochemical Techniques. Two credits. Pre/Corequisite; CHEM 6500 or 6510 or consent of instructor. Laboratory in biochemical techniques with emphasis on protein purification, enzyme kinetics, carbohydrate and lipid analysis, and manipulation of DNA. Offered every spring.

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ECON
Actuarial Sciences Only

6390 Social Insurance, Pensions, and Benefits. Three credits. Prerequisites: ECON 4390/5390 (or equivalent). An intensive survey of policy and practice in employee benefits, with an in-depth examination of pension plans. Covers an interdisciplinary mix of economics, accounting/finance, law, and regulation.

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6620 Econometrics I. Three credits. (Same as FIN 6620.) Prerequisite: ECON 4620 or equivalent. Focuses on ordinary least squares regression analysis, covering the problems of specification, multicollinearity, heteroskedasticity, autocorrelation, and endogeneity. SAS statistical software used as a tool for manipulating data, conducting forecasts, carrying out Monte Carlo simulations, and performing statistical inference.

(click for catalog description)

6630 Econometrics II. Three credits. Prerequisite: ECON 6620 or permission of instructor. Emphasizes methods of time series analysis, including Box-Jenkins methods, general-to-specific modeling, volatility models, vector autoregressions, unit roots and cointegration, unobserved component and state space models, and neural networks. Integrates practical applications in various computing environments including SAS, RATS, and Matlab.

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ET
Engineering Management Only

6010 Safety Planning. Three credits. Advanced study of planning in occupational safety and health management, including program planning and development methods and techniques as well as various systems approaches to hazard control.

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6190 SIX SIGMA. Three credits. The Six Sigma methodology is defined as a comprehensive and flexible system for achieving, sustaining, and maximizing business success. Through class instruction, simulations, and hands-on projects, students will be able to identify and focus on customers' critical-to-quality (CTQ) characteristics and solve problems using the define, measure, analyze, improve, and control (DMAIC) process and its associated tools. A Green Belt certification will be awarded upon successful completion of an industry/business Green Belt project

(click for catalog description)

6300 Project Management and Soft Skills. Three credits. Project management processes and knowledge areas as sanctioned by the International Project Management Institute (PMI). Successful completion of the course will earn 23 contact hours/professional development units (PDUs) issued by PMI.

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6390 Productivity Strategies/ Lean Systems. Three credits. Topics include the human element (supervisory and teamwork skills), the theoretical aspect (laws and science covering service and production systems), and the practical aspect (tools for lean operational systems implementation). Theoretical and practical methods needed to complete a required industry/business project and obtain a certification in Lean Manufacturing.

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6510/20 Advanced Topics in Technology. Three credits. Independent investigation and report of current problems of particular interest to individual students directed by department faculty members.

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6620 Research Methods. Three credits. Introduces Master of Science students to scholarly research principles and to thesis formats for research reporting. A problem is researched and written up in thesis proposal format.

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6710 Current & Future Trends in Technology. Three credits. The latest advancements and practices in various engineering and technology fields. Selected topics may include computers and electronics, networking and telecommunication, instrumentation, lasers, automation and robotics, manufacturing and rapid prototyping, bioengineering and biotechnology, and renewable energy sources. Takes a student-centered, hands-on learning approach and focuses on understanding new technologies and how technology is used in the industry. Research projects will provide appropriate experience and accommodate individual's interest.

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GEOG
Geosciences Only

5310 Resource Management and Conservation. Three credits. Current problems related to intelligent use and management of environmental resources.

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5320 Economic Geography. Three credits. Relationship of the physical factors of the environment to the productive occupations of humans and the distribution of products. 

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5330 Political Geography. Three credits. Significance of geographical factors in understanding political relationships within and among nations; spatial implications of political decision-making processes.

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5340 Historical Geography. Three credits. The changing human geography of the United States during four centuries of settlement and development. Emphasis on changing population patterns as well as patterns of urban and rural settlement.

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5370 Urban Geography.Three credits.  An introduction to the development of towns, cities, and associated urban areas. Environmental problems also examined. Classroom analysis of various theories of urban development and data collected by field work.

(click for catalog description)                                                     

5380 Cartography.Four credits. General knowledge of the field including familiarity with the techniques and tools of professional cartography and graphics. Selected lectures and class discussions. A series of map construction assignments; a specialized map assignment supported by written analysis. Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.                                                              

(click for catalog description)

5401-5402 Field Course.Four Credits. Supervised study in some geographical area, preceded by classroom preview and concluded by a time of evaluation. Emphasis on natural and cultural elements of the environment with special attention directed toward the pattern of human occupancy.                                        

(click for catalog description)                      

5410 Geography of the United States and Canada. Three credits. Natural, cultural, and geographic environment of these regions.                       

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5420 Geography of Latin America. Three credits. Geographic regions of Mexico, Central America, the West Indies, and South America.                                    

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5430 Geography of Europe.Three credits. General distribution of natural and cultural features of Europe followed by a detailed study of the regions and countries of the southern, central, and northwestern parts of the continent. 

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5460 Geography of the Former Soviet Union.Three credits. Analysis of the natural, cultural, and human-use regions of the former Soviet Union.

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5470 Rural Settlement. Three credits.  A geographical analysis of forms, structures, and distribution of rura settlements in distinctive parts of the earth based upon their origin, function, and development. Special emphasis in analyzing rural settlements of middle Tennessee.

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5490 Remote Sensing. Four credits. The various aspects of remote sensing such as radar, satellite imagery, and infrared data. Use of data in preparation of maps and application to land use and environmental problems examined. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

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5500 Geography of the Middle East. Three credits. An analysis of the problems, issues, and theories involved in understanding the physical, cultural, and regional geography of the area.

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5510 Laboratory Problems in Remote Sensing. Four credits. Computer processing of selected satellite imagery. Laboratory will provide practical experience through design, execution, and completion of applied remote sensing projects, one of which will be the effects of an environmental impact.

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5560 Intermediate Geographic Information Systems. Three credits. Lecture and laboratory work related to the principles and applications of geographic information (GIS). Continued training in GIS analysis including raster analysis, spatial analysis, network analysis, and geocoding. Examines data management including data editing and geodatabase design and creation. Other topics include resource management, demographic, and civic applications.

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5570 Advanced Geographic Information Systems. Three credits. Advanced course in spatial analysis. Using spatial statistics, Visual Basic programming, and databases to solve problems involving proximity, density, clustering, the cost of travel paths, etc. Other major topics include environmental modeling and error analysis.

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6040 Geospatial Systems and Applications. Four credits.

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6050 Programming for Geospatial Database Applications. Three credits.

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GEOL
Geosciences Only

5000 Petrology and Petrography. Four credits. Igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Theories of formation and evolution based upon mineralogical and geochemical evidence. Examination and classification of rocks in hand sample and thin section. Additional assignments involving data analysis and interpretation and completion of a research paper required for graduate credit.

(click for catalog description)

5020 Geomorphic Regions of the United States. Four credits. The origin, regional distribution, and geomorphic features and history of the landforms of the United States. Students required to analyze maps, structure sections, and aerial photography to determine geomorphic form and the forces and processes that produced these forms plus research a geomorphical problem resulting in a thesis-type paper. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week

(click for catalog description)

5030 Invertebrate Micropaleontology. Four credits. Invertebrate and microscopic animal life of the past including recent preserved representatives and their ancient fossilized ancestors. Numerous field trips to local fossil-collecting sites. Designed to aid in the preparation of earth science teachers, geologists, and biologists. Research paper on a topic approved by instructor. An oral presentation of this material may be required. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

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5040 Engineering Geology. Three credits.

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5050 Meteorology. Three credits. Physical laws as they relate to the atmosphere, atmospheric processes and their effects on air masses, fronts, and atmospheric circulation, the dynamics of the atmosphere and its relationship to the hydrosphere. Special problem to be assigned by the instructor.

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5060 Principles of Geoscience. Four credits. Includes topics from geology, astronomy, meteorology, and oceanography. Specifically designed to aid in the preparation of earth science teachers in the public schools. Term paper on topic approved by the instructor. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

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5070 Sedimentation and Stratigraphy. Four credits. Sedimentary rocks; the processes of sedimentation, the alteration of sediments through time, and an examination of the resulting stratigraphic units. For geoscience majors and those with interests in soil mechanics and civil engineering. Research paper on a topic approved by the instructor. An oral presentation may also be required. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

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5080 Structural Geology. Three credits. Orientation and deformation of rock. Geometric, analytical, and statistical solutions to structural problems. Emphasis on three-dimensional visualization, problem solving, geological map interpretation, and the mechanics ofdeformation. Case analyzing, research, and interpretation required. Lecture and laboratory.

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5100 Geophysical Prospecting. Four credits. Survey of seismic, gravimetric, and magnetic/electrical exploration methods. Applied course covering some elementary theory, basic field practice, computation fundamentals, interpretation techniques. Case analysis, research, and interpretation required. Two-hour lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

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5130 Hydrogeology. Four credits. Basic processes and measurement of the hydrologic cycle, including precipitation, evaporation, surface runoff, stream flow, soil moisture, and
ground water. Emphasis placed on ground water, including geology of occurrence, principles of flow, conceptual models of regional flow, chemistry and quality, well hydraulics, aquifer characteristics, resource development, detection of pollutants, and contaminant transport. Additional individual research project required, including a written and classroom report. Lecture and laboratory.

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5140 Inorganic Geochemistry. Three credits. Principles of inorganic geochemistry. Geochemistry of the earth and solar system, isotope geochronometers, thermodynamics of geochemical processes, mineral stability diagrams, isotope fractionation, rates of geochemical processes, chemical weathering, chemical compositions of surface and groundwater, geochemical exploration, geochemical cycles, environmental geochemistry. Additional assignments involving data analysis and interpretation and completion of a research paper required for graduate credit. Three-hour lecture per week.

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5150 Environmental Applications of Hydrogeology. Three credits. Advanced course that emphasizes applied methods for assessing hazardous and solid waste facilities and contaminated ground water remediation techniques. Included will be site characterization methods, ground water sampling procedures, and monitoring well installation techniques. Additional assignments involving case history analysis with an oral presentation will be required of graduate students. Three hours lecture per week.

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5401-5402 Field Course. Four credits. Supervised study in some geological area preceded by classroom preview and concluded by a time of evaluation. Emphasis on the natural and physical elements of the environment, with special attention directed toward the geomorphology and geology of scientific areas. An intensive period of study and research on a full-time basis. Work required will depend on area researched and time involved. Consult department chair for specific fees.

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6000 Environmental Geosystems. Three credits.

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6010 Case Studies in Environmental Geosystems. Three credits.

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6020 Advanced Hydrogeology. Three credits. Basic processes and measurement of the hydrologic cycle, including precipitation, evaporation, surface runoff, stream flow, soil moisture, and ground water. Emphasis on ground water including geology of occurrence, principles of flow, conceptual models of regional flow, chemistry and quality, well hydraulics, aquifer characteristics, resource development, detection of pollutants, and contaminant transport.

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6030 Geoscience Colloquium. Two credits.

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INFS
Geosciences Only

6500 IT Project Management Planning and Implementation. Three credits. Planning and implementation issues such as project planning and selection, portfolio management, problem solving, communication, conflict resolution, change management, and leadership. Includes a substantial emphasis on organizational and people issues in project management.

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6510 IT Project Risk Assessment and Control. Three credits. Elements involved in identifying and mitigating IT project risks. Offers preparation to monitor project progress, identify and quantify the impact of risks, evaluate the degree to which a program is troubled, and apply appropriate decision strategies to problematic situations.

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6520 IT Project Management Case Studies. Three credits. Integrates all areas of IT project management into a coherent analysis. Covers topics, situations, and problems using case study techniques. Includes the development of project management software skills.

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6710 IT Systems Development Project Management. Three credits. Prerequisite: Previous coursework or experience in systems analysis. Practical explanation of the total systems concept and a knowledge of systems development. Addresses the entire development cycle including analysis, design, and implementation. Includes an emphasis on project management.

(click for catalog description)

MATH
Actuarial Sciences Only

6601 Problems in Mathematics-Advanced Calculus: (click for catalog description)
One to nine credits. Course rotation: TBD (as of 10/2013)

6602 Problems in Mathematics-Number Theory: (click for catalog description)
One to nine credits. Course rotation: TBD (as of 10/2013)

6603 Problems in Mathematics-Mathematics of Finance: (click for catalog description)
One to nine credits. Course rotation: Fall (as of 10/2013)

6604 Problems in Mathematics-Mathematics of Life Contingencies: (click for catalog description)
One to nine credits. Course rotation: Spring (as of 10/2013)

6605 Problems in Mathematics-Numerical Analysis: (click for catalog description)
One to nine credits. Course rotation: TBD (as of 10/2013)

6606 Problems in Mathematics-Topology: (click for catalog description)
One to nine credits. Course rotation: TBD (as of 10/2013)

6607 Problems in Mathematics-Abstract Algebra: (click for catalog description)
One to nine credits. Course rotation: TBD (as of 10/2013)

6608 Problems in Mathematics-Combinatorics and Graph Theory: (click for catalog description)
One to nine credits. Course rotation: TBD (as of 10/2013)

6640 Thesis Research. One to six credits. Selection of a research problem, review of pertinent literature, collection and analysis of data, and composition of thesis. Once enrolled, student should register for at least one credit hour of master's research each semester until completion. S/U grading.

(click for catalog description)

MGMT
All Programs

6740 Leadership and Motivation. Three credits. Issues in leadership and motivation in business organizations. An examination of the theoretical framework for lead­ership and motivation processes serves as foundation. Emphasis on practical issues and applications of leadership development and motivation.

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NURS
Health Care Informatics Only

6400 Introduction to the Clinical Healthcare Environment. Two credits. For M.S. in Professional Science informatics professionals without a clinical health care background. Topics include an overview of the health care industry with a cursory analysis of the various players and their roles, as well as current issues in health care delivery. Students with two or more years of clinical health care experience are not required to take this course and may choose an elective.

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6401 Introduction to Healthcare Informatics. Three credits. Prerequisite: Digital literacy. Foundation to informatics study providing the theoretical framework for information management within various health care settings. Topics include and overview of health care information systems and applications and national health care information management initiatives.

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6402 Healthcare Information Systems and Technology Integration. Three credits. Prerequisite: Instructor/advisor permission. Pre/Corequisite: NURS 6401. Foundations of information system hardware and software interaction inclusive of the structure and function of networks and the Internet. Offers preparation for leading technology integration projects in practice. Additional topics will include computer hardware found in health care information systems, interface standards, and human-computer interaction such as ergonomics and workflow analysis.

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6403 Project Management in the Design and Analysis of Healthcare Information Systems. Three credits. Prerequisite: NURS 6407. Explores project management concepts and skills related to the analysis and design of information systems. Topics include project management, systems lifecycle and solution design, vendor and system selection, and evaluating solutions against strategic objectives.

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6404 Project Management in the Implementation & Evaluation of Healthcare Information Systems. Three credits. Prerequisite: NURS 6403. Explores project management concepts and skills related to the implementation and evaluation of information systems. Topics include project management, systems testing, implementation strategies, and solution evaluation.

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6406 Health Care Data Analysis and Evidence-based Practice. M.S. in Professional Science prerequisite: STAT 5140 and NURS 6402. Complex data analysis within the health care environment with emphasis on health care practice outcomes for quality improvement. Principles of data collection, organization, statistical analysis, and interpretation presented. Data analysis used as a tool for problem identification and data mining. Three credits.

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6407 Informatics Application I. Two credits. Prerequisite: NURS 6402. Integrates informatics concepts with tools used in health care informatics practice. Topics include database design, concept mapping, workflow analysis, and solution modeling.

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6409 Informatics Application II. Two credits. Prerequisite: NURS 6404. Integrates further informatics concepts with tools used in health care informatics practice. Topics include Web applications, Web site and media design, and data presentation.

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6410 Informatics Practicum. Four credits. Opportunity to gain informatics-related experiences in the health care setting. Students will complete a minimum of 200 hours in the clinical setting, functioning under the supervision of an informatics professional. Specific learning objectives developed based upon the clinical placement. Students eligible to write the ANCC certification exam following this course.

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6501 Advanced Adult Health Nursing I. Three credits.

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STAT
5140 for All Programs
6160, 6180 for Actuarial Sciences and Biostatistics
5200 for Actuarial Sciences Only
Remaining Courses for Biostatistics Only

5140 Probabilistic and Statistical Reasoning. Three credits. Prerequisite: STAT 5130 or equivalent or enrollment in the Masters of Science in Professional Science program. Focuses on probability and statistics concepts. Topics include binomial and normal probabilistic modeling; important statistical concepts such as confounding, randomization, sampling variability and significance; statistical testing of significant differences and associations; and design experiments to test research hypotheses.

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5200 Statistical Methods for Forecasting. Three credits. Prerequisite: STAT 4190. Application of the regression model in forecasting regression and exponential smoothing methods to forecast nonseasonal time-series, seasonal series and globally constant seasonal models, stochastic time series models; and forecast evaluation. (Prepares actuarial science students for the Society of Actuaries Exam #120 and Exam Part 3A administered by the Casualty Actuarial Society.)

(click for catalog description)

6020 Introduction to Biostatistics. Three credits. Prerequisite: Introductory probability/statistics course or permission of instructor. Contemporary and medical research methodology for biostatistics. Descriptive and inferential statistics including parametric and nonparametric hypothesis testing methods, sample size, statistical significance and power, survival curve analysis, relative risk, odds ratios, chi square modeling, and analysis of variance. Data will be analyzed using statistical software.

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6160 Advanced Mathematical Statistics I. Three credits. Prerequisite: Two semesters of calculus or permission of instructor. Introduction to theoretical probability used in statistics with an emphasis on the mathematical theory. A rigorous treatment of random variables, their probability distributions, and mathematical exceptions in a univariate and multivariate setting. Includes conditional probabilities, stochastic independence, sampling theory, and limit laws.

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6180 Advanced Mathematical Statistics II. Three credits. Prerequisite: STAT 6160 or permission of instructor. Theory of estimation and hypothesis tests. Topics include minimum variance unbiased estimation, methods of estimation, most powerful tests, likelihood ratio tests, decision theory, and sequential test procedures.

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6510 Biostatistical Methods. Three credits. Prerequisite: STAT 6020 and 6160 or permission of instructor. Biostatistical methods focusing on the design and analysis of clinical trials and sample surveys. Topics include clinical trial designs and phases, bias, random error, sample size, power, estimating clinical effects, design-based methods of data analysis from sample surveys, sampling techniques, nonresponse, and sampling frame issues.

(click for catalog description)

 

 

6520 Advanced Biostatistical Methods. Three credits. Prerequisite: STAT 6020 and 6160 or permission of instructor. Mathematically rigorous presentation of categorical data analysis methods for univariate and correlated multivariate responses including contingency table analysis, logistic regression, and loglinear models; survival analysis for analyzing time-to-event data including survivor functions, Kaplan-Meier curves, and Cox proportional hazards model; and other health applications of multivariate analysis methods.

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6602 Problems in Statistics-Regression Analysis. Three credits. Prerequisite: Mathematical maturity, preparation in the area and (normally) nine semester hours of graduate study. Problems course dealing with theory, methods, and applications.

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6603 Problems in Statistics-Nonparametric Statistics. Three credits. Prerequisite: Mathematical maturity, preparation in the area and (normally) nine semester hours of graduate study. Problems course dealing with theory, methods, and applications.

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6604 Problems in Statistics-Experimental Design. Three credits. Prerequisite: Mathematical maturity, preparation in the area and (normally) nine semester hours of graduate study. Problems course dealing with theory, methods, and applications.

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6605 Problems in Statistics-SAS Programming. Three credits. Prerequisite: Mathematical maturity, preparation in the area and (normally) nine semester hours of graduate study. Problems course dealing with theory, methods, and applications.

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