• Faculty try to provide personalized instruction even at the doctoral level
  • MTSU students have opportunities to present their research findings
  • National speakers help keep curricula up to date
  • Dedicated and talented faculty help change student lives

Economics, Ph.D.

The Ph.D. in Economics provides students with the opportunity to combine advanced training in the field with teaching and applied research. Graduates of the program may possess the skills necessary for successful careers as university professors, research economists, consultants for private businesses, and advisors to the government. Department faculty and staff provide resources and support needed to ensure the placement of doctoral students after four years of study. The department’s attention to job market preparation has led to an excellent record of placing its graduates in tenure-track positions at well-known public universities and colleges. Students who opt for non-academic employment have accepted research positions at branches of the Federal government, FedEx, Regional Economic Models Inc., and various Tennessee state government organizations.

Professors prepared and cared

Professors prepared and cared

Both Brandeanna (Allen) Sanders and Alan Seals studied economics at MTSU. Graduating with both an M.A. (2005) and Ph.D. (2008), Seals took a position with Auburn University as an assistant professor. “The best aspect of MTSU’s Ph.D. program is the faculty who run it,” he says. “While in graduate school, I was able to work closely with people who cared about my professional success and growth as a scholar. It was a great experience. ”After graduating with both an M.A. (2008) and a Ph.D. (2010), Sanders went to work as an economist with the U.S. Department of Defense. Her background in labor economics proved to be very useful in that important position. “I use techniques that I learned at MTSU to analyze the impact of policies that affect pay and benefits on the recruiting and retention decisions of the armed forces. I also found the seminar series [at MTSU] to be great preparation for presentations to senior leadership in my department.”

His professors were great people, too

His professors were great people, too

John Nunley is a Blue Raider through and through, earning his B.S. (2004), M.A. (2005), and Ph.D. (2008) degrees in economics at MTSU. Today, he conducts research and teaches economics at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. Regarding MTSU’s Ph.D. program, he says its greatest asset is the outstanding faculty. “After interacting with economists from all over the world and hearing about their experiences in graduate school, it is apparent to me that the training I received at MTSU was superior in many ways. In my view, the key advantage of MTSU’s Ph.D. program is the willingness of the faculty to work closely with students, their quality advice, their commitment to developing quality researchers and teachers, and the many hours they spend reading your papers and thinking about your research. The faculty are great economists and mentors. But perhaps more importantly, they are great people, and it was a pleasure for me to study under them.”

Many MTSU economics graduates land good jobs, thanks to open doors provided by faculty and their outreach to economics alumni. An aspect of training in the graduate program is grooming students for the job search and job interview to help with landing a job that suits the person’s interest and skill set. Career opportunities for Ph.D. economics graduates can be found in areas such as

  • Banking
  • Consulting
  • Government
  • Higher education
  • Insurance
  • Law
  • Manufacturing
  • Private business
  • Public service
  • Real estate
  • Risk management 

Employers of MTSU Economics Ph.D. graduates include

  • Auburn University
  • Baldwin Wallace University
  • Belmont University
  • Black Hills State University
  • FedEx
  • Marshall University
  • Missouri Southern State University
  • New York City Department of Finance
  • Prince Mohammad Bin Fahd University
  • Regional Economics Models, Inc.
  • Tennessee City/State Government
  • Tennessee Department of Revenue
  • Tennessee Education Association
  • Tennessee Valley Authority
  • Tennessee Wesleyan College
  • Transylvania University
  • U.S. Department of Defense
  • U.S. Food and Drug Administration
  • University of California-Berkeley
  • University of Wisconsin-La Crosse
  • West Virginia University
  • Westminster International University at Taschkent
  • Wittenberg University

The Department of Economics and Finance offers a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Economics with specializations in labor economics and industrial organization.

Applicants for the Ph.D. program are not required to have earned a master’s degree. Students who wish to enroll must submit an application form, an official undergraduate transcript (a bachelor’s degree or equivalent is required to be admitted), an official GRE score, and three letters of recommendation. The program is a full-time course of study, and priority in admission will be given to those who enroll as full-time students.

For complete curriculum details, click on the REQUIREMENTS tab above.

Additionally, departmental graduate programs include a Master of Arts (M.A.) in Economics, in which one may choose either a general curriculum or a concentration in Financial Economics, and a Master of Science in Finance.

There is also a graduate minor in Economics. 

Undergraduate

The Economics and Finance Department offers undergraduate majors in Economics and Finance. The Economics major leads to two degrees: a Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A.) and a Bachelor of Science (B.S.). The B.B.A. is a business major and is also available with a concentration in Labor Relations. The B.S. is offered through the College of Liberal Arts.

The Finance major includes concentrations in Business Finance, Financial Institution Management, Insurance, and Real Estate, all leading to the B.B.A.

Undergraduate students can pursue minors in Economics, Economics and Finance, Industrial Relations, Finance, Real Estate, Insurance, and Real Estate/Insurance.

Economics, Ph.D.

Adam Rennhoff, Program Director
(615) 898-2931
Adam.Rennhoff@mtsu.edu

The mission of the graduate program in economics is to provide students with advanced studies in economic theory and research methodology. To accomplish its mission, the Department of Economics and Finance offers three degree programs: the Master of Arts (M.A.) with a major in Economics, the Master of Science (M.S.) with a major in Finance, and the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) with a major in Economics. The department's approach to these degree programs is global, interactive, and innovative.

The M.A. program offers two curricular paths: general economics and Financial Economics. M.A. students in economics are offered preparation for careers in private business and public service. The focus of the M.A. program is on decision analysis and applied research. The M.S. in Finance offers three concentrations: Corporate Finance, Investments, and General Finance. M.S. students are offered a graduate-level knowledge base and expertise for work in the growing field of finance. Ph.D. students in economics are trained for careers in teaching and applied research. The Ph.D. provides students with the opportunity to combine advanced training in economics with educational pedagogy and research methodology.

Please see undergraduate catalog for information regarding undergraduate programs.

Admission Requirements

For admission to the doctoral program, candidates are expected to attain a GRE score of 302 (current scale) or 1100 (former scale) or better. Candidates must also have completed, at a minimum, one semester of calculus and hold a baccalaureate degree with a minimum 3.0 GPA (on a 4 point scale).

Application Procedures

All application materials are to be submitted to the College of Graduate Studies.

Applicant must

  1. submit an application with the appropriate application fee (online at www.mtsu.edu/graduate/apply.php);
  2. submit official scores on the General Record Examination (GRE);
  3. submit official transcripts of all previous college work.

Degree Requirements

The Doctor of Philosophy in Economics requires students entering to complete a minimum of 64 semester hours, including a minimum of 51 hours of formal coursework, a one-credit hour economics workshop (two presentations), and 12 hours of dissertation research. Students entering with a master's degree in Economics may have up to 12 hours applied toward the 51 hours of formal coursework. Of the total 64 hours, at least 43 hours must be at the 7000 level.

Students must demonstrate competency in economic theory by passing the Qualifying Examination in microeconomics and macroeconomics at the end of the student's first year of study. Students must also complete coursework in a major field and a minor field. A field consists of a minimum of two doctoral-level (7000-level) courses. Students complete a research paper in their major field during the second summer after finishing the field coursework.

Candidates must successfully defend a dissertation prospectus and, upon approval by the candidate's dissertation committee, prepare a dissertation. The student is responsible for contacting a Ph.D. faculty member about becoming the chair of the student's dissertation committee. The chair will suggest other potential committee members.

After completion of the dissertation, the candidate is given an oral examination dealing with the structure and content of the dissertation.The candidate will be notified in writing of the committee's approval of the dissertation.

Curriculum: Economics

 Candidate must complete 64 hours in the following course of study:

Required Core Courses (40 hours)

 

  • ECON 6100 - Mathematical Methods for Economics

    3 credit hours

    Preparation for core courses in economics. Covers all essential mathematical methods including basic matrix algebra, exponential and logarithmic functions, the basics of differential calculus, unconstrained optimization, constrained optimization subject to equality and inequality constraints, comparative statics, and the Envelope theorem.

  • ECON 7010 - Macroeconomics I  3 credit hours  

    ECON 7010 - Macroeconomics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ECON 6100. First-semester core course in macroeconomic theory for students pursuing the Ph.D. in Economics. Macroeconomic models are used to study topics related to the national economy. Topics include dynamic macroeconomics, the basic Solow model, savings in an overlapping generations model, infinitely lived agents, recursive deterministic models, recursive stochastic models, Hansen's real business cycle model, practical dynamic programming, impulse response functions, vector auto-regressions, and money.

  • ECON 7020 - Microeconomics I  3 credit hours  

    ECON 7020 - Microeconomics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ECON 6100. First-semester core course in microeconomic theory for students pursuing the Ph.D. in Economics. Microeconomic models are used to study topics related to the production of firms and consumer choice. Topics include profit maximization, cost minimization, utility maximization, choice and demand, consumer and producer surplus, uncertainty, competitive markets, and monopoly.

  • ECON 7030 - Macroeconomics II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ECON 6100 and ECON 7010. Second-semester core course in macroeconomic theory for students pursuing a Ph.D. in Economics. Focuses on modern intertemporal macroeconomics. Develops discrete-time dynamic optimization techniques and examines the role of fiscal and monetary policies in centralized and decentralized economics and their welfare implications. Reviews recent developments in economic growth theory and international macroeconomics. Focus is quantitative but developing intuition about macroeconomic dynamics stressed.

  • ECON 7040 - Microeconomics II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ECON 6100 and ECON 7020. Second-semester core course in microeconomic theory for students pursuing a Ph.D. in Economics. Examines oligopolies and pricing strategies with game theory, general equilibrium including the incorporation of public goods and externalities, and information economics with asymmetric information in principle-agent models. Mathematical models used to derive the theories; comfort with multivariate calculus and linear algebra essential.

  • ECON 7060 - Econometrics I  3 credit hours  

    ECON 7060 - Econometrics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite:ECON 6100. First of three Ph.D.-level courses in econometrics, in which empirical models are used to address research questions. Topics include linear algebra, estimation, ordinary least squares, statistical inference, hypothesis testing, dummy variables, the linear statistical model, regression analysis, and non-linear models. Integrates practical applications in various computing environments, including SAS, STATA, RATS, and MATLAB.

  • ECON 7070 - Econometrics II  3 credit hours  

    ECON 7070 - Econometrics II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites:ECON 6100 and ECON 7060. Second of three Ph.D.-level courses in econometrics, in which empirical models are used to address research questions. Topics include the methods of time series analysis, Box-Jenkins methods, general-to-specific modeling, volatility models, vector auto-regressions, unit roots, co-integration, unobserved components, state space models, and neural networks. Integrates practical applications in various computing environments, including SAS, STATA, RATS, and MATLAB.

  • ECON 7080 - Econometrics III  3 credit hours  

    ECON 7080 - Econometrics III

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ECON 7060, ECON 7070, and passed Ph.D. qualifying exams in microeconomics and macroeconomics. The third of three Ph.D.-level courses in econometrics, in which empirical models are used to address research questions. Emphasizes nonlinear estimation methodology for cross-section and panel data.  Includes discussion of various qualitative and limited dependent variable models, including those for discrete responses, censored and truncated data, sample selection problems, treatment effects, and duration analysis. Incorporates practical applications in SAS, STATA, and other computing environments.

  • ECON 7105 - Advanced Mathematical Methods for Economists

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ECON 6100 or equivalent as determined by instructor. Covers methods of dynamic optimization including calculus of variations, optimal control, and dynamic programming and the mathematical prerequisites of these methods such as integration, difference and differential equations, and advanced matrix algebra. Covers basics of mathematical statistics. Computer applications emphasized.

  • ECON 7130 - Microeconomics III

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ECON 7040. Third semester course in microeconomic theory for students pursuing a Ph.D. in economics. Advanced methods used in practical applications in microeconomics. Topics include set theory approach to cost and production with an emphasis on measurement methods for productivity and efficiency, multifactor productivity and index numbers, and applications of game theory to issues in law and economics, political economy, and finance. Familiarity with calculus, linear algebra, and game theoretic analysis of basic strategies in oligopoly expected.

  • ECON 7500 - Economics Workshop

    1 credit hours

    Students present material related to their dissertation proposals or ongoing dissertation research to peers and the graduate faculty in a formal workshop setting. Credit is awarded after a student completes two separate workshop presentations that are judged satisfactory by the attending graduate faculty.

  • ECON 7600 - Instructional Development and Practice in Economics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Student must have passed Ph.D. qualifying exams in microeconomics and macroeconomics. Workshop environment where students present key economic concepts, use new technology, organize and structure courses and individual classes, use assessment tools, and deal with conflict in the classroom. Offers preparation to teach undergraduate classes in economics.

  • ECON 7660 - History of Economic Thought

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Graduate status and proficiency in reading and writing English. Examines the history of Western economics beginning with the ancient Greeks, including the medieval scholastics, the early modern mercantilists, and selected thinkers from classical liberal economics, socialism, the historical and institutionalist schools of economics, neoclassical economics, and contemporary economics.

  • ECON 7900 - Research Seminar  3 credit hours  

    ECON 7900 - Research Seminar

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ECON 7630; student must have passed Ph.D. qualifying exams in microeconomics and macroeconomics. Students practice writing academic papers, critiques, and monographs in economics and finance with some emphasis on developing a viable dissertation proposal. Incorporates a detailed discussion of essential steps in the publication process such as identifying a topic, fitting it into the literature, developing a theoretical background, preparing the data, choosing an appropriate methodology, and presenting the results, as well as pitfalls to avoid in working on dissertations and academic papers.

Fields of Study

Labor Economics (6 hours)

  • ECON 7510 - Labor Economics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Student must have passed Ph.D. qualifying exams in microeconomics and macroeconomics. Serves as the first half of an introduction to labor economics in the areas of human capital formation, wage determination, labor market mobility and job search, changes in wage structure, youth behavior and outcomes, shifts in labor demand, compensating wage differentials, and discrimination. Focus is to introduce students to current economic research methods and modern econometric techniques in preparation for conducting independent research.

  • ECON 7520 - Labor Economics II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Student must have passed Ph.D. qualifying exams in microeconomics and macroeconomics. Serves as the second half to an introduction of the leading theories in labor economics. Focuses on the most current published research techniques as found in top general interest and labor field journals. The nature of the course dictates that a wide range of topics be covered and that content changes. Past topics have included unemployment and inflation, employment allocation and job loss, technological progress, globalization, inequalities, labor market policies, youth behavior and outcomes, health, and labor supply decisions. Frequent use of multivariate regression analysis and other modern econometric techniques allows students to enhance skills necessary to conduct independent research in the field.

Industrial Organization (6 hours)

 

  • ECON 7810 - Industrial Organization I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Must have passed Ph.D. qualifying exams in microeconomics and macroeconomics. Serves as the first half of the graduate sequence in industrial organization, in which microeconomic models are used to study topics related to firm strategy and market structure. Emphasis on preparing students to conduct their own research, introduces students to current methods and techniques in a variety of research areas within the field of industrial organization.

  • ECON 7820 - Industrial Organization II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Must have passed Ph.D. qualifying exams in microeconomics and macroeconomics. Serves as the second half of the graduate sequence in industrial organization, in which microeconomic models are used to study topics related to firm strategy and market structure. Aim is to improve students' economic modeling and econometric skills in order to prepare them to conduct independent research. Students will make extensive use of statistical software packages such as MATLAB and STATA.

Dissertation Research (12 hours)

 

  • ECON 7640 - Dissertation Research  1 to 6 credit hours  

    ECON 7640 - Dissertation Research

    1 to 6 credit hours

    Selection of a research problem, review of pertinent literature, collection and analysis of data, and composition of dissertation. Once enrolled, student should register for at least one credit hour of doctoral research each semester until completion. S/U grading.

Sample Course and Examination Schedule

The following sample schedule outlines the sequence of Ph.D. course requirements:

Summer Prior to Fall Year 1

 

  • ECON 6100 - Mathematical Methods for Economics

    3 credit hours

    Preparation for core courses in economics. Covers all essential mathematical methods including basic matrix algebra, exponential and logarithmic functions, the basics of differential calculus, unconstrained optimization, constrained optimization subject to equality and inequality constraints, comparative statics, and the Envelope theorem.

Fall Semester-Year 1

 

  • ECON 7105 - Advanced Mathematical Methods for Economists

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ECON 6100 or equivalent as determined by instructor. Covers methods of dynamic optimization including calculus of variations, optimal control, and dynamic programming and the mathematical prerequisites of these methods such as integration, difference and differential equations, and advanced matrix algebra. Covers basics of mathematical statistics. Computer applications emphasized.

  • ECON 7010 - Macroeconomics I  3 credit hours  

    ECON 7010 - Macroeconomics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ECON 6100. First-semester core course in macroeconomic theory for students pursuing the Ph.D. in Economics. Macroeconomic models are used to study topics related to the national economy. Topics include dynamic macroeconomics, the basic Solow model, savings in an overlapping generations model, infinitely lived agents, recursive deterministic models, recursive stochastic models, Hansen's real business cycle model, practical dynamic programming, impulse response functions, vector auto-regressions, and money.

  • ECON 7020 - Microeconomics I  3 credit hours  

    ECON 7020 - Microeconomics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ECON 6100. First-semester core course in microeconomic theory for students pursuing the Ph.D. in Economics. Microeconomic models are used to study topics related to the production of firms and consumer choice. Topics include profit maximization, cost minimization, utility maximization, choice and demand, consumer and producer surplus, uncertainty, competitive markets, and monopoly.

  • ECON 7060 - Econometrics I  3 credit hours  

    ECON 7060 - Econometrics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite:ECON 6100. First of three Ph.D.-level courses in econometrics, in which empirical models are used to address research questions. Topics include linear algebra, estimation, ordinary least squares, statistical inference, hypothesis testing, dummy variables, the linear statistical model, regression analysis, and non-linear models. Integrates practical applications in various computing environments, including SAS, STATA, RATS, and MATLAB.

Spring Semester-Year 1

 

  • ECON 7030 - Macroeconomics II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ECON 6100 and ECON 7010. Second-semester core course in macroeconomic theory for students pursuing a Ph.D. in Economics. Focuses on modern intertemporal macroeconomics. Develops discrete-time dynamic optimization techniques and examines the role of fiscal and monetary policies in centralized and decentralized economics and their welfare implications. Reviews recent developments in economic growth theory and international macroeconomics. Focus is quantitative but developing intuition about macroeconomic dynamics stressed.

  • ECON 7040 - Microeconomics II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ECON 6100 and ECON 7020. Second-semester core course in microeconomic theory for students pursuing a Ph.D. in Economics. Examines oligopolies and pricing strategies with game theory, general equilibrium including the incorporation of public goods and externalities, and information economics with asymmetric information in principle-agent models. Mathematical models used to derive the theories; comfort with multivariate calculus and linear algebra essential.

  • ECON 7070 - Econometrics II  3 credit hours  

    ECON 7070 - Econometrics II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites:ECON 6100 and ECON 7060. Second of three Ph.D.-level courses in econometrics, in which empirical models are used to address research questions. Topics include the methods of time series analysis, Box-Jenkins methods, general-to-specific modeling, volatility models, vector auto-regressions, unit roots, co-integration, unobserved components, state space models, and neural networks. Integrates practical applications in various computing environments, including SAS, STATA, RATS, and MATLAB.

  • ECON 7660 - History of Economic Thought

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Graduate status and proficiency in reading and writing English. Examines the history of Western economics beginning with the ancient Greeks, including the medieval scholastics, the early modern mercantilists, and selected thinkers from classical liberal economics, socialism, the historical and institutionalist schools of economics, neoclassical economics, and contemporary economics.

Summer-Year 1

 

  • ECON 7600 - Instructional Development and Practice in Economics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Student must have passed Ph.D. qualifying exams in microeconomics and macroeconomics. Workshop environment where students present key economic concepts, use new technology, organize and structure courses and individual classes, use assessment tools, and deal with conflict in the classroom. Offers preparation to teach undergraduate classes in economics.

  • ECON 7999 - Comprehensive Examination and Preparation

    1 to 3 credit hours

    Open only to students who are not enrolled in any other graduate course and who will take the master's comprehensive examination during the term. The student must contact the graduate advisor during the first two weeks of the term for specifics regarding the details of this comprehensive examination preparatory course. Credit may not be applied to degree requirements.

  • Qualifying Exam-Macroeconomics
  • Qualifying Exam-Microeconomics

Fall Semester-Year 2

 

  • ECON 7080 - Econometrics III  3 credit hours  

    ECON 7080 - Econometrics III

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ECON 7060, ECON 7070, and passed Ph.D. qualifying exams in microeconomics and macroeconomics. The third of three Ph.D.-level courses in econometrics, in which empirical models are used to address research questions. Emphasizes nonlinear estimation methodology for cross-section and panel data.  Includes discussion of various qualitative and limited dependent variable models, including those for discrete responses, censored and truncated data, sample selection problems, treatment effects, and duration analysis. Incorporates practical applications in SAS, STATA, and other computing environments.

  • ECON 7510 - Labor Economics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Student must have passed Ph.D. qualifying exams in microeconomics and macroeconomics. Serves as the first half of an introduction to labor economics in the areas of human capital formation, wage determination, labor market mobility and job search, changes in wage structure, youth behavior and outcomes, shifts in labor demand, compensating wage differentials, and discrimination. Focus is to introduce students to current economic research methods and modern econometric techniques in preparation for conducting independent research.

  • ECON 7810 - Industrial Organization I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Must have passed Ph.D. qualifying exams in microeconomics and macroeconomics. Serves as the first half of the graduate sequence in industrial organization, in which microeconomic models are used to study topics related to firm strategy and market structure. Emphasis on preparing students to conduct their own research, introduces students to current methods and techniques in a variety of research areas within the field of industrial organization.

Spring Semester-Year 2

 

  • ECON 7130 - Microeconomics III

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ECON 7040. Third semester course in microeconomic theory for students pursuing a Ph.D. in economics. Advanced methods used in practical applications in microeconomics. Topics include set theory approach to cost and production with an emphasis on measurement methods for productivity and efficiency, multifactor productivity and index numbers, and applications of game theory to issues in law and economics, political economy, and finance. Familiarity with calculus, linear algebra, and game theoretic analysis of basic strategies in oligopoly expected.

  • ECON 7520 - Labor Economics II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Student must have passed Ph.D. qualifying exams in microeconomics and macroeconomics. Serves as the second half to an introduction of the leading theories in labor economics. Focuses on the most current published research techniques as found in top general interest and labor field journals. The nature of the course dictates that a wide range of topics be covered and that content changes. Past topics have included unemployment and inflation, employment allocation and job loss, technological progress, globalization, inequalities, labor market policies, youth behavior and outcomes, health, and labor supply decisions. Frequent use of multivariate regression analysis and other modern econometric techniques allows students to enhance skills necessary to conduct independent research in the field.

  • ECON 7820 - Industrial Organization II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Must have passed Ph.D. qualifying exams in microeconomics and macroeconomics. Serves as the second half of the graduate sequence in industrial organization, in which microeconomic models are used to study topics related to firm strategy and market structure. Aim is to improve students' economic modeling and econometric skills in order to prepare them to conduct independent research. Students will make extensive use of statistical software packages such as MATLAB and STATA.

Summer-Year 2

 

  • ECON 7640 - Dissertation Research  1 to 6 credit hours  

    ECON 7640 - Dissertation Research

    1 to 6 credit hours

    Selection of a research problem, review of pertinent literature, collection and analysis of data, and composition of dissertation. Once enrolled, student should register for at least one credit hour of doctoral research each semester until completion. S/U grading.

  • Field Paper due by September 1st.

Fall Semester-Year 3

 

  • ECON 7640 - Dissertation Research  1 to 6 credit hours  

    ECON 7640 - Dissertation Research

    1 to 6 credit hours

    Selection of a research problem, review of pertinent literature, collection and analysis of data, and composition of dissertation. Once enrolled, student should register for at least one credit hour of doctoral research each semester until completion. S/U grading.

  • ECON 7900 - Research Seminar  3 credit hours  

    ECON 7900 - Research Seminar

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ECON 7630; student must have passed Ph.D. qualifying exams in microeconomics and macroeconomics. Students practice writing academic papers, critiques, and monographs in economics and finance with some emphasis on developing a viable dissertation proposal. Incorporates a detailed discussion of essential steps in the publication process such as identifying a topic, fitting it into the literature, developing a theoretical background, preparing the data, choosing an appropriate methodology, and presenting the results, as well as pitfalls to avoid in working on dissertations and academic papers.

Spring Semester-Year 3

 

  • ECON 7500 - Economics Workshop

    1 credit hours

    Students present material related to their dissertation proposals or ongoing dissertation research to peers and the graduate faculty in a formal workshop setting. Credit is awarded after a student completes two separate workshop presentations that are judged satisfactory by the attending graduate faculty.

  • ECON 7640 - Dissertation Research  1 to 6 credit hours  

    ECON 7640 - Dissertation Research

    1 to 6 credit hours

    Selection of a research problem, review of pertinent literature, collection and analysis of data, and composition of dissertation. Once enrolled, student should register for at least one credit hour of doctoral research each semester until completion. S/U grading.

  • Dissertation Proposal

Summer-Year 3

 

  • ECON 7640 - Dissertation Research  1 to 6 credit hours  

    ECON 7640 - Dissertation Research

    1 to 6 credit hours

    Selection of a research problem, review of pertinent literature, collection and analysis of data, and composition of dissertation. Once enrolled, student should register for at least one credit hour of doctoral research each semester until completion. S/U grading.

Fall Semester-Year 4

 

  • ECON 7640 - Dissertation Research  1 to 6 credit hours  

    ECON 7640 - Dissertation Research

    1 to 6 credit hours

    Selection of a research problem, review of pertinent literature, collection and analysis of data, and composition of dissertation. Once enrolled, student should register for at least one credit hour of doctoral research each semester until completion. S/U grading.

Spring Semester-Year 4

 

  • ECON 7640 - Dissertation Research  1 to 6 credit hours  

    ECON 7640 - Dissertation Research

    1 to 6 credit hours

    Selection of a research problem, review of pertinent literature, collection and analysis of data, and composition of dissertation. Once enrolled, student should register for at least one credit hour of doctoral research each semester until completion. S/U grading.

  • Dissertation Defense

Program Notes

On matriculation, students will complete a degree plan. The Ph.D. advisor must approve the degree plan. In some cases, it may be possible to complete the program on a part-time basis, but the program is designed for full-time students.

Candidate must

  1. file a degree plan in the College of Graduate Studies prior to entry into the program;
  2. file a Notice of Intent to Graduate form in the College of Graduate Studies within the first two weeks of the term in which the student intends to graduate.

Faculty and staff continue to carry out a multi-pronged recruiting strategy to target top students. Periodically, information packets containing a poster, program brochures, the program’s curriculum, graduation requirements and application forms are distributed to every undergraduate department of economics in the nation. At various intervals each year, the department contacts all Ph.D. alumni and invites them to provide the names of potential students for the program. Every fall, the graduate director and several current graduate students hold a question-and-answer session sponsored by the undergraduate Economics Club to discuss graduate study in economics. Faculty work with students to prepare them for the job market, and efforts are made to reach out to alumni to help build a network of potential employers for MTSU graduates.

Contact and Student Information

Adam D. Rennhoff
Adam.Rennhoff@mtsu.edu
615-898-2931

Adam D. Rennhoff
Adam.Rennhoff@mtsu.edu
615-898-2931

Department of Economics and Finance
Middle Tennessee State University
Box 27
1301 East Main Street
Murfreesboro, TN 37132

College of Graduate Studies
Middle Tennessee State University
MTSU Box 42
1301 East Main Street
Murfreesboro, TN 37132

MTSU College of Graduate Studies

Provides innovative, interdisciplinary programs and allows students to work in a collaborative envir... [more]

2016 MTSU Campus Tour

From the acclaimed academic programs and state-of-the-art facilities to MTSU campus life and the thr... [more]