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  • An Economic Outlook Conference offers big picture expertise
  • Faculty member Charles Baum studies financial effects of people's actions
  • Visiting economics lecturers broaden the horizons of students at MTSU
  • Economics PhD students present their research in seminars
  • The Economics and Finance Career Fair offers networking opportunities

Economics

If there's one subject that has been in the headlines almost daily over the past several years, it's the economy. It would behoove leaders on both sides of the political aisle—not to mention the barons of Wall Street—to bone up on economics so that a consensus could be reached on how best to allocate and manage America's resources. There is an urgent need for sharp, fresh minds in the field, and graduates can discover lucrative careers in economics in both business and government. The U.S. Census Bureau (2009) reports that economics majors are among those who earn the highest median salaries of all majors.

Passing on a wealth of knowledge

Passing on a wealth of knowledge

John Nunley received his Bachelor of Business Administration in Economics from MTSU in 2004. He subsequently received his M.A. in Economics (2005) and Ph.D. in Economics (2008) from MTSU and with that foundation went on to teach at the university level. Currently, he is a highly respected assistant professor at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse and has published numerous articles in professional journals.

The legacy of a giant

The legacy of a giant

MTSU celebrated its Diamond Anniversary in 1986 with the theme “Our Year to Shine.” That same year the university's light was intensified when alumnus Dr. James McGill Buchanan (B.A. 1940) received the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Science for his development of the theory of Public Choice, which deals with the techniques of resource allocation. Buchanan, who died Jan. 9, 2013, is honored and remembered through the Buchanan Fellowship, MTSU's most prestigious award given to an entering freshman.

Students who major in Economics can seek work in the field of microeconomics, which focuses on individual firms and consumers, and macroeconomics, which analyzes national income and growth. Career opportunities are available in the following general areas:

  • Banking
  • Consulting
  • Government
  • Higher education
  • Insurance
  • Law
  • Manufacturing
  • Private business
  • Public service
  • Real estate
  • Risk management

Employers of MTSU economics alumni include

  • Auburn University
  • Baldwin-Wallace College
  • Belmont University
  • Bethel College of Tennessee
  • Black Hills State University
  • Federal Reserve
  • FedEx
  • Gordon College
  • Marshall University
  • Midstate Technical College
  • Prince Mohammad Bin Fahd University
  • Regional Economic Models, Inc.
  • Tennessee Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations
  • Tennessee Regulatory Authority
  • U.S. Department of Commerce
  • U.S. Department of Defense
  • U.S. Department of Labor
  • U.S. State Department
  • University of Maryland-Eastern Shore
  • Urbana University
  • West Virginia University
  • Westminster International University at Taschkent

MTSU offers two undergraduate degrees with a major in Economics: a Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A.) and a Bachelor of Science (B.S.). The B.B.A. is a business major, also available with a concentration Labor Relations. The B.S. is offered through the College of Liberal Arts. 

Undergraduate students can pursue minors in Economics, Economics and Finance, Industrial Relations, Finance, Real Estate, Insurance, or Real Estate/Insurance.

Other programs in the department

Undergraduate
The Department of Economics and Finance also offers a Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A.) degree in Finance (http://www.mtsu.edu/programs/finance/#t-0) , with concentrations in Business Finance, Financial Institution Management, Insurance, or Real Estate.

Graduate
Graduate students have a number of options in the Department of Economics and Finance. They can earn a Master of Science (M.S.) in Finance, choosing among concentrations in Corporate Finance, General, or Investments. Or they can earn Master of Arts (M.A.) orDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees in Economics. A concentration in Financial Economics is available under the M.A.

Economics B.B.A. Economics Labor Relations Economics Nonbusiness (B.S.)


Economics, B.B.A.

Department of Economics and Finance 
615-898-2527
Charles Baum, program coordinator
Charles.Baum@mtsu.edu

A major in Economics leading to the B.B.A. degree requires that the student, at a minimum, complete

  1. the business requirements (see Degree Requirements) in the college;
  2.  ECON 3510, ECON 3520, ECON 4440, ECON 4620;
  3. at least 15 additional upper-division hours in economics.

This program requires 50 percent of the major hours to be completed in residence at MTSU. An alternate business minor may be chosen, but it may require total hours for graduation to exceed 120.

Economics majors are encouraged to enroll in Honors sections of 2410 and 2420.

The program below includes a Business Administration minor. An alternate business minor may be chosen, but it may require total hours for graduation to exceed 120.

Curriculum: Economics

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities, and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories.

Freshman

 

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • MATH 1630 - College Mathematics for Managerial, Social, and Life Sciences

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra and a Math Enhanced ACT greater than 25 or MATH 1710. Topics include solving systems of linear equations, Leontief models, linear programming, mathematics of finance, set theory, and probability theory.

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

  • ECON 2410 - Principles of Economics, Macroeconomics

    3 credit hours

    As an aid to understanding modern economic society: economic concepts of national income and its fluctuations, inflation, unemployment, role of the banking system, monetary and fiscal policies, and international topics.

  • ECON 2420 - Principles of Economics, Microeconomics

    3 credit hours

    As an aid to understanding modern economic society: economic concepts of consumer and firm behavior; the pricing of goods, services, and productive factors; international topics; and an overview of the American economy.

  • Natural Sciences (2 prefixes) 8 credit hours
  • Elective 1 credit hour
  • MATH 1810 - Applied Calculus I  3 credit hours  OR

    MATH 1810 - Applied Calculus I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Eligibility to take MATH 1710. First of a four-course sequence. Introduces mathematical modeling applied to real-world problems. Sets, functions, inverse models, limits, continuity, first and second order model building, single variable differentiation, implicit differentiation, inverse problems (exponential and log models). First and second derivatives used to study the behavior of real-world applications.

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

Sophomore

 

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA)

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts (2 prefixes) 6 credit hours
  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours
  • ACTG 2110 - Principles of Accounting I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: A college-level math course; ENGL 1010; sophomore standing. Financial accounting for proprietorships and partnerships with emphasis on the accounting cycle for service and merchandising organizations. Additional topics include accounting for receivables; inventories; property, plant, and equipment; and current liabilities. (Not open to students with credit in ACTG 3000.)

  • ACTG 2120 - Principles of Accounting II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ACTG 2110. A continuation of financial accounting concepts with emphasis on debt and equity structures, the statement of cash flows, and ratio analysis. Managerial accounting topics include job, standard- and activity-based costing, cost/volume/profit (CVP) analysis, and budgeting. (Not open to students with credit in ACTG 2125 or ACTG 3000.) [Same as TBR Community Colleges ACCT 1020.]

  • Elective 3 credit hours
  • BIA 2610 - Statistical Methods

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1630 or MATH 1810. The application of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data to make business decisions. Topics include measures of central tendency, variation, probability theory, point and interval estimation, correlation and regression. Computer applications emphasized.

 

Choose 6 hours from:

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

Junior

 

  • BLAW 3400 - Legal Environment of Business

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing. Legal rights and potential liabilities of business persons. Presentation of the dynamic nature of law in responding to the changing social, ethical, political, regulatory, and international environment. Includes the development and nature of the legal system; business crimes; the law of torts and product liability; constitutional limitations on regulatory powers; legislative, judicial, and administrative control of business activity through the laws of business organizations, securities regulations, antitrust laws, employment laws, labor and safety laws, and consumer protection.

  • BUS 3000 - Dale Carnegie Communications and Human Relations Seminar

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Junior standing and major in the Jones College of Business. Uses the proven content and design of a Dale Carnegie seminar which includes lecture, in-class activities, case studies, reflective exercises, and role-play experiences. Helps students develop self confidence and leadership ability, strengthen ability to relate to and motivate others, enhance ability to communicate effectively, reduce stress, and present a positive attitude.

  • MGMT 3610 - Principles of Management

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing. Concepts of the management functions of planning, organizing, and controlling with an emphasis on behavioral science concepts as applied to managing people in organizations.

  • ECON 3510 - Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ECON 2410; junior standing; admission into the College of Business. Analysis of national income, employment, and price levels. Monetary and fiscal policies; international economic relations.

  • ECON 3520 - Intermediate Microeconomic Theory

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ECON 2410; ECON 2420; admission into the College of Business. Second semester of microeconomic theory following ECON 2420. Topics include consumer choice, the labor supply model, the life cycle model, choice under uncertainty, production and supply, the cost of production, perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, oligopoly, game theory, and the human capital model.

  • FIN 3010 - Business Finance  3 credit hours  

    FIN 3010 - Business Finance

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing. Theory of corporate finance, emphasizing wealth creation, valuation, risk, capital budgeting, and cost of capital.

  • ECON upper-division elective 3 credit hours §
  • MKT 3820 - Principles of Marketing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing. Survey of the functions, processes, and institutions involved in the distribution of consumer and industrial goods and services. Decision making in marketing management introduced.

 

  • BIA 3620 - Introduction to Business Analytics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIA 2610 or equivalent, junior standing. Corequisite: BIA 3621. Introduction to the concepts and application of data analytics in business. Spreadsheet software and associated analytic tools will be utilized to visualize, model, and analyze business data using a hands-on-approach.

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

Senior

 

  • Elective 3 credit hours
  • Business electives 6 credit hours
  • ECON upper-division electives 12 credit hours §
  • ECON 4440 - International Economics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites:  ECON 2410, ECON 2420; junior standing; admission into the College of Business. Differences between domestic trade and international trade, foundations of international trade, economic effects of free trade and restricted trade; mechanisms of international payments and structure of balance of payments; history and contemporary issues of trade policies and world monetary systems.

  • ECON 4620 - Econometrics and Forecasting

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites:  ECON 2410, ECON 2420; MATH 1810 or MATH 1910; junior standing, and admission into the College of Business. The application of statistical methods to economic problems; covers statistical inference, regression analysis in economics and finance, and an introduction to econometrics. Emphasis on applications to actual economic data and includes use of econometric software.

  • BUAD 4980 - Strategic Management

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Admission into the College of Business; must be taken after completion of the business requirements and in the semester in which the student graduates. Development of top management perspective with emphasis on policy and strategy formulation and evaluation through the demonstration of competence in handling multifunctional business problems. Transfer credit not allowed; must be taken in residence.

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

Total hours in program: 120

 

NOTE:

*A 2.25 GPA in these courses is required for admission to the Jones College of Business.

§Admission required

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Economics, B.B.A., Academic Map  


Economics, Labor Relations Concentration, B.B.A.

Department of Economics and Finance 
615-898-2527
Charles Baum, program coordinator
Charles.Baum@mtsu.edu

A major in Economics leading to the B.B.A. degree requires that the student, at a minimum, complete

  1. the business requirements (see Degree Requirements) in the college;
  2. ECON 3510, ECON 3520, ECON 4440, and ECON 4620;
  3. at least 15 additional upper-division hours in economics.

A concentration in Labor Relations may be developed by completing the economics requirements in no. 2 above and completing 15 additional upper-division hours in economics with 9 semester hours selected from appropriate courses (ECON 4390ECON 4420ECON 4490, or ECON 4510) in the economics listings.

This program requires 50 percent of the required major hours to be completed in residence at MTSU.

Economics majors are encouraged to enroll in Honors sections of 2410 and 2420.

The program below includes a Business Administration minor. An alternate business minor may be chosen, but it may require total hours for graduation to exceed 120.

Curriculum: Economics, Labor Relations

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories.

Freshman

 

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • MATH 1630 - College Mathematics for Managerial, Social, and Life Sciences

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra and a Math Enhanced ACT greater than 25 or MATH 1710. Topics include solving systems of linear equations, Leontief models, linear programming, mathematics of finance, set theory, and probability theory.

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

  • ECON 2410 - Principles of Economics, Macroeconomics

    3 credit hours

    As an aid to understanding modern economic society: economic concepts of national income and its fluctuations, inflation, unemployment, role of the banking system, monetary and fiscal policies, and international topics.

  • ECON 2420 - Principles of Economics, Microeconomics

    3 credit hours

    As an aid to understanding modern economic society: economic concepts of consumer and firm behavior; the pricing of goods, services, and productive factors; international topics; and an overview of the American economy.

  • Natural Sciences (2 prefixes) 8 credit hours
  • Elective 1 credit hour

 

  • MATH 1810 - Applied Calculus I  3 credit hours  OR

    MATH 1810 - Applied Calculus I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Eligibility to take MATH 1710. First of a four-course sequence. Introduces mathematical modeling applied to real-world problems. Sets, functions, inverse models, limits, continuity, first and second order model building, single variable differentiation, implicit differentiation, inverse problems (exponential and log models). First and second derivatives used to study the behavior of real-world applications.

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

Sophomore

 

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

 

  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts (2 prefixes) 6 credit hours
  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours
  • Elective 3 credit hours
  • ACTG 2110 - Principles of Accounting I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: A college-level math course; ENGL 1010; sophomore standing. Financial accounting for proprietorships and partnerships with emphasis on the accounting cycle for service and merchandising organizations. Additional topics include accounting for receivables; inventories; property, plant, and equipment; and current liabilities. (Not open to students with credit in ACTG 3000.)

  • ACTG 2120 - Principles of Accounting II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ACTG 2110. A continuation of financial accounting concepts with emphasis on debt and equity structures, the statement of cash flows, and ratio analysis. Managerial accounting topics include job, standard- and activity-based costing, cost/volume/profit (CVP) analysis, and budgeting. (Not open to students with credit in ACTG 2125 or ACTG 3000.) [Same as TBR Community Colleges ACCT 1020.]

  • BIA 2610 - Statistical Methods

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1630 or MATH 1810. The application of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data to make business decisions. Topics include measures of central tendency, variation, probability theory, point and interval estimation, correlation and regression. Computer applications emphasized.

 

 Choose 6 hours from:

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

Junior

 

  • BLAW 3400 - Legal Environment of Business

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing. Legal rights and potential liabilities of business persons. Presentation of the dynamic nature of law in responding to the changing social, ethical, political, regulatory, and international environment. Includes the development and nature of the legal system; business crimes; the law of torts and product liability; constitutional limitations on regulatory powers; legislative, judicial, and administrative control of business activity through the laws of business organizations, securities regulations, antitrust laws, employment laws, labor and safety laws, and consumer protection.

  • BUS 3000 - Dale Carnegie Communications and Human Relations Seminar

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Junior standing and major in the Jones College of Business. Uses the proven content and design of a Dale Carnegie seminar which includes lecture, in-class activities, case studies, reflective exercises, and role-play experiences. Helps students develop self confidence and leadership ability, strengthen ability to relate to and motivate others, enhance ability to communicate effectively, reduce stress, and present a positive attitude.

  • MGMT 3610 - Principles of Management

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing. Concepts of the management functions of planning, organizing, and controlling with an emphasis on behavioral science concepts as applied to managing people in organizations.

  • ECON 3510 - Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ECON 2410; junior standing; admission into the College of Business. Analysis of national income, employment, and price levels. Monetary and fiscal policies; international economic relations.

  • ECON 3520 - Intermediate Microeconomic Theory

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ECON 2410; ECON 2420; admission into the College of Business. Second semester of microeconomic theory following ECON 2420. Topics include consumer choice, the labor supply model, the life cycle model, choice under uncertainty, production and supply, the cost of production, perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, oligopoly, game theory, and the human capital model.

  • FIN 3010 - Business Finance  3 credit hours  

    FIN 3010 - Business Finance

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing. Theory of corporate finance, emphasizing wealth creation, valuation, risk, capital budgeting, and cost of capital.

  • ECON upper-division elective 3 credit hours  §
  • MKT 3820 - Principles of Marketing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing. Survey of the functions, processes, and institutions involved in the distribution of consumer and industrial goods and services. Decision making in marketing management introduced.

 

  • BIA 3620 - Introduction to Business Analytics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIA 2610 or equivalent, junior standing. Corequisite: BIA 3621. Introduction to the concepts and application of data analytics in business. Spreadsheet software and associated analytic tools will be utilized to visualize, model, and analyze business data using a hands-on-approach.

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

Senior

 

  • Elective 3 credit hours
  • Business elective 6 credit hours
  • ECON upper-division electives 12 credit hours §
  • ECON 4440 - International Economics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites:  ECON 2410, ECON 2420; junior standing; admission into the College of Business. Differences between domestic trade and international trade, foundations of international trade, economic effects of free trade and restricted trade; mechanisms of international payments and structure of balance of payments; history and contemporary issues of trade policies and world monetary systems.

  • ECON 4620 - Econometrics and Forecasting

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites:  ECON 2410, ECON 2420; MATH 1810 or MATH 1910; junior standing, and admission into the College of Business. The application of statistical methods to economic problems; covers statistical inference, regression analysis in economics and finance, and an introduction to econometrics. Emphasis on applications to actual economic data and includes use of econometric software.

  • BUAD 4980 - Strategic Management

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Admission into the College of Business; must be taken after completion of the business requirements and in the semester in which the student graduates. Development of top management perspective with emphasis on policy and strategy formulation and evaluation through the demonstration of competence in handling multifunctional business problems. Transfer credit not allowed; must be taken in residence.

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

Total hours in program: 120

 

NOTE:

*A 2.25 GPA in these courses is required for admission to the Jones College of Business.

§Admission required
 

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Economics, Labor Relations Concentration, B.B.A., Academic Map  


Economics (Nonbusiness), B.S.

Department of Economics and Finance

Students desiring a more flexible program than outlined in the B.B.A. degree in Economics may elect to pursue a B.S. degree in Economics. Candidates for this degree are not required to complete the Jennings A. Jones College of Business requirements, but they must meet the specific B.S. degree requirements listed in this catalog (Academic Policies and Procedures). Any student electing the B.S. alternative should consult directly with the department chair to develop an acceptable degree program. This degree is offered through the College of Liberal Arts and is not considered a degree in business administration. A maximum of 25 percent of courses for a B.S. degree in Economics can be taken in business courses. Students must complete at least one minor.

Curriculum: Economics (Nonbusiness)

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories.

Freshman

 

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • MATH 1630 - College Mathematics for Managerial, Social, and Life Sciences

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra and a Math Enhanced ACT greater than 25 or MATH 1710. Topics include solving systems of linear equations, Leontief models, linear programming, mathematics of finance, set theory, and probability theory.

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

  • Natural Sciences (2 prefixes) 8 credit hours
  • ECON 2410 - Principles of Economics, Macroeconomics

    3 credit hours

    As an aid to understanding modern economic society: economic concepts of national income and its fluctuations, inflation, unemployment, role of the banking system, monetary and fiscal policies, and international topics.

  • Nonbusiness elective(s) 4 credit hours
  • MATH 1810 - Applied Calculus I  3 credit hours  OR

    MATH 1810 - Applied Calculus I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Eligibility to take MATH 1710. First of a four-course sequence. Introduces mathematical modeling applied to real-world problems. Sets, functions, inverse models, limits, continuity, first and second order model building, single variable differentiation, implicit differentiation, inverse problems (exponential and log models). First and second derivatives used to study the behavior of real-world applications.

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

Sophomore

 

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

 

  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts (2 prefixes) 6 credit hours
  • ECON 2420 - Principles of Economics, Microeconomics

    3 credit hours

    As an aid to understanding modern economic society: economic concepts of consumer and firm behavior; the pricing of goods, services, and productive factors; international topics; and an overview of the American economy.

  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3  credit hours
  • Nonbusiness elective 3 credit hours
  • Elective 3 credit hours

 

  • MATH 1530 - Applied Statistics  3 credit hours  OR

    MATH 1530 - Applied Statistics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra and a Math Enhanced ACT 19 or greater or equivalent. Descriptive statistics, probability, and statistical inference. The inference unit covers means, proportions, and variances for one and two samples, and topics from one-way ANOVA, regression and correlation analysis, chi-square analysis, and nonparametrics.

  • BIA 2610 - Statistical Methods

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1630 or MATH 1810. The application of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data to make business decisions. Topics include measures of central tendency, variation, probability theory, point and interval estimation, correlation and regression. Computer applications emphasized.

 

Choose 6 hours from:

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

Junior

 

  • ECON 3210 - The Financial System and the Economy

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ECON 2410; junior standing. Basic introduction to the functions of financial institutions and markets in the conduct of domestic and international economic transactions. Within financial market context, focus on special role that money plays as an asset and a determinant of the price level, the cause of inflation and inflation's effects on interest rates and borrowing costs, and the influence of Federal Reserve actions (monetary policy) on money and interest rates.

  • ECON 3510 - Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ECON 2410; junior standing; admission into the College of Business. Analysis of national income, employment, and price levels. Monetary and fiscal policies; international economic relations.

  • ECON 3520 - Intermediate Microeconomic Theory

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ECON 2410; ECON 2420; admission into the College of Business. Second semester of microeconomic theory following ECON 2420. Topics include consumer choice, the labor supply model, the life cycle model, choice under uncertainty, production and supply, the cost of production, perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, oligopoly, game theory, and the human capital model.

  • Electives 6 credit hours
  • Upper-division electives 9 credit hours
  • Nonbusiness elective 3 credit hours
  • ECON elective 3 credit hours

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

Senior

 

  • ECON 4620 - Econometrics and Forecasting

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites:  ECON 2410, ECON 2420; MATH 1810 or MATH 1910; junior standing, and admission into the College of Business. The application of statistical methods to economic problems; covers statistical inference, regression analysis in economics and finance, and an introduction to econometrics. Emphasis on applications to actual economic data and includes use of econometric software.

  • ECON 4440 - International Economics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites:  ECON 2410, ECON 2420; junior standing; admission into the College of Business. Differences between domestic trade and international trade, foundations of international trade, economic effects of free trade and restricted trade; mechanisms of international payments and structure of balance of payments; history and contemporary issues of trade policies and world monetary systems.

  • ECON upper-division electives 6 credit hours
  • ECON electives 6 credit hours
  • Upper-division electives 12 credit hours *

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

Total hours in program: 120

 

NOTE:

*Student must complete 42 hours of upper-division courses.

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Economics (Nonbusiness), B.S., Academic Map  

Dr. Charles Baum
Professor
charles.baum@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Jason M. DeBacker
Assistant Professor
jason.debacker@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Mamit Deme
Professor
mamit.deme@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Albert E. Deprince
Professor
albert.deprince@mtsu.edu

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Dr. E. Anthon Eff
Professor
anthon.eff@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Bichaka Fayissa
Professor
bichaka.fayissa@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Stuart J. Fowler
Associate Professor
stuart.fowler@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Duane B. Graddy
Professor | Economics Graduate Director
duane.graddy@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Christopher C. Klein
Associate Professor
chris.klein@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Karen Mulligan
Associate Professor
karen.mulligan@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Mark F. Owens
Associate Professor
mark.owens@mtsu.edu

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Dr. David A. Penn
Associate Professor
david.penn@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Adam D. Rennhoff
Associate Professor
adam.rennhoff@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Michael Roach
Assistant Professor
michael.roach @mtsu.edu

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Dr. Sean P. Salter
Associate Professor | Interim Chair
sean.salter@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Joachim Zietz
Professor
joachim.zietz@mtsu.edu

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Economics

ECON 2410 - Principles of Economics, Macroeconomics
3 credit hours

As an aid to understanding modern economic society: economic concepts of national income and its fluctuations, inflation, unemployment, role of the banking system, monetary and fiscal policies, and international topics.

ECON 2420 - Principles of Economics, Microeconomics
3 credit hours

As an aid to understanding modern economic society: economic concepts of consumer and firm behavior; the pricing of goods, services, and productive factors; international topics; and an overview of the American economy.

ECON 3210 - The Financial System and the Economy
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ECON 2410; junior standing. Basic introduction to the functions of financial institutions and markets in the conduct of domestic and international economic transactions. Within financial market context, focus on special role that money plays as an asset and a determinant of the price level, the cause of inflation and inflation's effects on interest rates and borrowing costs, and the influence of Federal Reserve actions (monetary policy) on money and interest rates.

ECON 3430 - Public Finance
3 credit hours

(Same as FIN 3430.) Prerequisites: ECON 2410, ECON 2420; junior standing; admission into the College of Business. Economic foundations of federal tax and expenditure policies. Current issues in federal budget policy. Policy applications illustrating key concepts such as public goods, externalities, income distribution, tax incidence, tax equity, and allocative efficiency. Intergovernmental fiscal relations.

ECON 3510 - Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ECON 2410; junior standing; admission into the College of Business. Analysis of national income, employment, and price levels. Monetary and fiscal policies; international economic relations.

ECON 3520 - Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ECON 2410; ECON 2420; admission into the College of Business. Second semester of microeconomic theory following ECON 2420. Topics include consumer choice, the labor supply model, the life cycle model, choice under uncertainty, production and supply, the cost of production, perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, oligopoly, game theory, and the human capital model.

ECON 3970 - Cooperative Education
3 credit hours

(Same as FIN 3970.) Prerequisites: Junior standing and admission into the College of Business. Cooperative Education experiences provide students with opportunities for on-the-job training in conjunction with on-campus academics. These courses do not satisfy major or minor requirements. Interested students should contact the Career Development Center. Students will be selected for participation, and opportunities may be limited.

ECON 3980 - Cooperative Education
3 credit hours

(Same as FIN 3980.) Prerequisites: Junior standing and admission into the College of Business. Cooperative Education experiences provide students with opportunities for on-the-job training in conjunction with on-campus academics. These courses do not satisfy major or minor requirements. Interested students should contact the MTSU Cooperative Education Office. Students will be selected for participation, and opportunities may be limited.

ECON 4100 - Law and Economics
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Admission into the College of Business; junior standing preferred. Applies microeconomic theory to the analysis of legal rules and institutions. Examines the economics tools lawyers and experts use in analyzing antitrust issues. Topics include intellectual property rights, measuring compensatory damages in liability cases, current legal issues such as tort reform, the role of economics in bargaining and settlement, and antitrust law topics such as mergers and price-fixing.

ECON 4260 - Financial Markets and Institutions
3 credit hours

(Same as FIN 4260.) Prerequisites: ECON 3210 with a minimum grade of C (2.00); FIN 3010 with a minimum grade of C (2.00); and admission into the College of Business. Examines the structure and functioning of our monetary-financial system. Emphasis on the institutional process of financial intermediation in the financial marketplace and the role that specific institutions and instruments play.  

ECON 4310 - Problems in Government Finance
3 credit hours

(Same as FIN 4310). Prerequisites: ECON 2410, ECON 2420, and admission into the College of Business. Current issues in taxation, theory of income taxation, consumption taxes, property and wealth taxes. Advanced treatment of tax incidence, tax efficiency, income distribution, fiscal federalism, and state and local budget issues.

ECON 4390 - Employee Benefits
3 credit hours

(Same as FIN 4390.) Prerequisites: Junior standing and admission into the College of Business. Includes descriptive review and taxation, legislative, and administrative dimensions of the major components of employee benefit plans such as retirement systems, deferred compensation plans, health insurance, death benefits, disability benefits, paid and unpaid time off. Technical analysis and problem solving emphasized to develop applied skills. Social insurance and international benefits integrated.

ECON 4400 - Economics of Antitrust and Regulation
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ECON 2420; junior standing; admission into the College of Business. Economic analysis of the antitrust laws and their enforcement: price-fixing, collusion, mergers, monopolization, and vertical arrangements. Economics theories of regulation/deregulation applied to actual regulatory policies: natural monopoly; price and entry regulation; health, safety, and environmental regulation; and intellectual property. Includes historical development as well as current applications.  

ECON 4420 - Labor and Human Resource Economics
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ECON 2410 or ECON 2420; junior standing; and admission into the College of Business. Current issues and theories, returns to training and education (human capital), earnings differences; union impacts and government regulation of labor relations and labor markets; human resource information system modeling, including applied PC or mainframe data analysis and integration of Internet information sources.

ECON 4440 - International Economics
3 credit hours

Prerequisites:  ECON 2410, ECON 2420; junior standing; admission into the College of Business. Differences between domestic trade and international trade, foundations of international trade, economic effects of free trade and restricted trade; mechanisms of international payments and structure of balance of payments; history and contemporary issues of trade policies and world monetary systems.

ECON 4470 - Economic Development of the Third World
3 credit hours

Prerequisites:  ECON 2410, ECON 2420; junior standing; and admission into the College of Business. Conditions and problems of the less-developed countries; causes, processes, and consequences of economic development; introduction to basic growth models, development theories, and strategies for development. Economic as well as noneconomic factors studied.

ECON 4480 - State and Local Economies
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: Admission into the College of Business and junior standing preferred. Analysis of state and local economies in the United States. Topics include local economic development; data sources for the analysis of local economies; comparing local economies; employment and the labor force; income and earnings; population and housing; identifying driving industries; impact analysis; cluster analysis; underemployment; local workforces; human capital; location, infrastructure, and natural resources; regional development policy; recruiting; tax incentives; technology and green policy; and examining short-term and long-term policy issues.  

ECON 4490 - Industrial Relations Legislation
3 credit hours

(Same as BLAW 4490 and MGMT 4490.) Prerequisites: Admission into the College of Business and junior standing. Economic background and effects of government regulation of labor relations; emphasis on a detailed examination of the National Labor Relations Act as amended or expanded by the Labor Management Relations Act, the Labor Management Reporting and Disclosures Act, and Title 7 of the Civil Rights Act.

ECON 4500 - Urban and Regional Economics
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ECON 2410, ECON 2420, and admission into the College of Business. Economic problems of urban communities, including problems resulting from population shifts to suburbia; urban planning; land utilization; revenue structures; urban renewal; transportation; problems of minority and poverty groups.

ECON 4510 - Unions and Collective Bargaining
3 credit hours

(Same as MGMT 4510.) Prerequisites: Junior standing and admission into the College of Business. The collective bargaining process: its evolution in the public and private sectors and its contemporary legal environment; compensation, institutional and administrative issues; strikes and impasse resolution procedures.

ECON 4570 - Managerial Economics
3 credit hours

Prerequisites:  ECON 2420; MATH 1630 or MATH 1810 or MATH 1910; junior standing; and admission into the College of Business. Familiarity with time value of money, spreadsheet, and regression analysis helpful. Microeconomic theories in depth; emphasizes practical applications in economic decisions. Topics cover fundamental economic concepts, theory of demand, theory of production, theory of cost, optimization, forecasting, game strategy in oligopolistic rivalry, long-term investment, and regression analysis.

ECON 4600 - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: Admission into the College of Business and junior standing preferred. Problems of environmental quality and natural resource scarcity from an economic perspective. Topics include interaction between the environment and the economy, benefits and costs of environmental regulation, use of incentives to achieve least-cost pollution control, international environmental issues such as global warming, the role of natural resources in the U.S. economy, problems associated with natural resource scarcity and depletion, and problems related to consumption of renewable resources.

ECON 4620 - Econometrics and Forecasting
3 credit hours

Prerequisites:  ECON 2410, ECON 2420; MATH 1810 or MATH 1910; junior standing, and admission into the College of Business. The application of statistical methods to economic problems; covers statistical inference, regression analysis in economics and finance, and an introduction to econometrics. Emphasis on applications to actual economic data and includes use of econometric software.

ECON 4650 - Comparative Economic Systems
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Admission into the College of Business. Compares economic institutions and performance among nations; presents the historical and cultural context of economic evolution in selected nations; and examines the relationship between institutional arrangements and outcomes such as prosperity, liberty, and equality.

ECON 4660 - History of Economic Thought
3 credit hours

Prerequisites:  ECON 2410, ECON 2420; junior standing; and admission into the College of Business. Background of modern economic thought; ancient economic thought; the main current of developing economic analysis through feudalism, mercantilism, and the physiocrats; Adam Smith and the classical economists; rebels and the neoclassical economists; twentieth-century contributions.

ECON 4680 - Health Economics
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ECON 2420; junior standing preferred. Introduces the application of economic models to health and the health care industry. Topics include individual health behaviors, demand for health care, health insurance and other institutions in health care markets, the role of government in health care, and health care reform. Empirical results and policy applications discussed.

ECON 4700 - Sports Economics
3 credit hours

Prerequisite:  Admission into the College of Business; junior standing preferred. Economic theories in the areas of public finance, labor markets, game theory, industrial organization, and price theory studied within the context of sports. Examines common misperceptions about sports-related statistical data and relates it to issues in the broader economy. Topics include benefits and costs of financing sports arenas, structure and competitiveness of sports leagues, antitrust exemptions, effects of title IX regulations, labor bargaining and negotiations, wage and price determination. Explores issues in collegiate sports such as potential for crowding out other college programs (the prisoner's dilemma).

ECON 4720 - Economic Issues in the Music Industry
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ECON 2420; admission into the College of Business; and junior standing. Economic analysis of issues arising in the recorded music industry largely in response to Internet availability of music formats. Topics include structure, conduct, and performance of the industry; optimal copyright policy; the economics of digital piracy; superstars and variety; payola; economics of two-sided markets; policy analysis; and evaluation of effects on social welfare.

ECON 4800 - Experimental and Behavioral Economics
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: ECON 2410 and ECON 2420; admission into the College of Business; junior standing preferred. Concepts in behavioral economics and current research methods in experimental economics. Focuses on common behavioral tendencies not well integrated into standard neoclassical economic theory. Topics include other regarding preferences, risk aversion, sunk cost fallacies, endowment effects, and common biases and errors in judgment and decision making. Explores current experimental research methods for identifying and quantifying such effects.  

ECON 4890 - Internship in Economics
1 to 3 credit hours

Prerequisites: Junior standing; admission into the College of Business; and recommendation of advisor. Supervised work experience in cooperating business firms or governmental agencies together with specialized academic study relating to the work experience. Pass/Fail.

ECON 4990 - Independent Study in Economics
1 to 3 credit hours

Prerequisites: Junior standing and admission into the College of Business. Problems for intensive study are chosen in joint consultation between student and instructor.

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