• MTSU features state’s only fermentation degree for food and energy production
  • Fast-growing fermentation industry needs skilled workers
  • Process boosts bolder flavors for food and drink, ranging from ales to yogurt
  • MTSU is near many craft facilities and major manufacturers

Fermentation Science, B.S.

MTSU’s new Fermentation Science major is the first degree program of its type in Tennessee and rare in the Southeast region. Fermentation is now understood to be an ideal vehicle for the production of highly nutritious and long-term stable foods with unique flavors, textures, and aromas. Tennessee is home to a large and diverse community of food processors, and the most significant growth has been in the fermented foods segment of this vitally important industry. Courses in Fermentation Science will be taught in partnership with local companies, and hands-on training sessions at industry sites as well as internships will be scheduled to accommodate both working professionals and traditional students. Tennessee hosts 60 wineries, 30 distilleries, 52 breweries, 10 cheese-making operations, the largest yogurt manufacturing plant in the world, additional smaller yogurt producers, and two major ethanol production facilities.

This program is approved for the Academic Common Market.

New brewery will house MTSU fermentation, sensory labs

New brewery will house MTSU fermentation, sensory labs

Alumnus Mark Jones (’90) founded Steel Barrel Brewing Co., a new 82-acre agribusiness enterprise opening in Murfreesboro in 2017. (Think Arrington Vineyards, only serviced by a brewery instead of a winery and raising hops instead of grapes.) The business will also serve as the location of MTSU’s new fermentation lab and sensory lab—a kind of “psychological space” highlighted by blind testing, tasting, and smelling activities. The cutting-edge facility is starting up just as MTSU launches the Fermentation Science program. “It’s almost meant to be, the way things are laying out,” Jones said. “Part of the new degree requires internships, and we can give students hands-on, real-world opportunities, as well as prepare what will become a qualified labor force for us.” The beer industry, which also includes the growing craft brewing segment, had a combined economic impact of $252.6 billion across the U.S. in 2014.

Fermentation is old and new at the same time

Fermentation is old and new at the same time

While the practice of fermenting foods dates back 8,000 years or so, the science behind the processes continues to evolve. And the search for bolder flavor and better nutrition in the U.S. is increasing the demand for familiar fermented foods like sourdough bread, as well as food products native to other countries such as kefir, miso, and pickled fruits and vegetables. “The science behind brewing beer and fermenting foods is largely the same,” program director Tony Johnston said. “We use microorganisms such as yeast, bacteria, and mold to create foods we like to consume—cheese, sour cream, buttermilk, yogurt, sauerkraut, summer sausage, pickles, kimchi.” Fermentation has the capability to produce probiotic compounds in foods, as well as convert sugars into acids that are “much better for us,” Johnston said. It’s also the only food preservation technique that doesn’t require the input of energy.

The explosive growth of the fermented foods and fermentation-derived energy over the last 20 years indicate significant potential for employment of graduates with the proposed degree. Fermented food manufacturers of every type need college graduates with specialized training who can enter the workforce ready to sustain and advance the industry. The B.S. in Fermentation Science addresses both the current, pressing needs of local industry and creates new opportunities for highly trained food industry specialists who could transition from one type of fermented food industry to another. A 2014 survey by the Master Brewers Association of the Americas (MBAA) shows a preference for a four-year degree for management and leadership positions, as well as for brewmasters or head brewers. Other positions where a four-year degree is indicated includes quality positions, brewery positions, lab technicians, and engineers. Job titles graduates may choose to pursue

  • Biomanufacturing operator
  • Bioprocess engineer/scientist/researcher
  • Brewer (assistant/associate/lead/master)
  • Brewery operations director
  • Cellar technician/manager/operator
  • Distiller (assistant/associate/master/head)
  • Enologist
  • Ethanol operator
  • Fermentation engineer
  • Fermentation process specialist/developer
  • Fermentation scientist
  • Manufacturing scientist
  • Maltster (assistant/senior/master/head)
  • Research winemaker
  • Research brewer
  • Research distiller
  • Scratch baker
  • Winemaker (assistant/associate/master/head) 

Employers of MTSU alumni include 

This information is still being compiled since this is a new program.

Program graduates will have the opportunity to work in a variety of positions for major manufacturers operating in middle Tennessee, including General Mills (Yoplait), Kroger (Dairy Division), Brown-Forman (Jack Daniel’s), and Diageo (George Dickel), as well as an ever-increasing number of locally owned and operated fermented food producers.

Examples of other potential local employers     

  • Cargill Inc.
  • Century Harvest Farms
  • Great Lakes Cheese
  • Greenbrier Distillery
  • Steel Barrel Brewing
  • Sweetwater Valley Farm
  • Tennessee Distilling Ltd.
  • Yazoo Brewing Company

Possible national/international companies

  • Anheuser-Busch Inc.
  • Boehringer Ingelheim Inc.
  • Constellation Brands Inc.
  • E. & J. Gallo Winery
  • Hach Company
  • Pfizer, Inc.
  • Ste. Michelle Wine Estates
  • Zymergen, Inc

MTSU offers the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Fermentation Science, a new program in the School of Agribusiness and Agriscience.

Within agriculture, fermentation science is one of the two fastest-growing areas of interest with the most immediate impact on the well-being of humanity. Program director Tony Johnston holds a doctorate in Enology and Viticulture and has worked extensively in the fermented foods industry.

Other majors in the School of Agribusiness and Agriscience leading to a B.S. are Agribusiness, Animal Science, Horse Science, and Plant and Soil Science. Students may also take courses in pursuit of an Agricultural Education Certificate. Undergraduate and graduate minors are available in Agriculture.

Graduate study includes the Master of Education (M.Ed.) in Administration and Supervision with a concentration in Agricultural Education Leadership and a Master of Science (M.S.) in Horse Science with concentrations in Equine Education, Equine Physiology, and Industry Management.

For complete curriculum details, click on the REQUIREMENTS tab above.

Fermentation Science, B.S.

School of Agribusiness and Agriscience 
615-898-2424
Tony Johnston, program coordinator
Tony.Johnston@mtsu.edu

The program leading to a major in Fermentation Science is designed for students who are interested in the science and art of fermenting foods and beverages as well as developing practical research and outreach initiatives to answer questions facing the growing fermentation-related industries in Tennessee, the United States, and the world.

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Fermentation Science, B.S. 

Degree Requirements

General Education (41 hours)

General Education requirements (shown in curricular listings below) include courses in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences.

The following General Education courses are recommended for this major:

  • MATH 1730 (Math)
  • BIOL 1110/1111 (Nat Sci)
  • CHEM 1110/1111 (Nat Sci)

Major Requirements (57 hours)

  • FERM 1000 - Introduction to Fermentation Science

    3 credit hours

    Survey of fermentation as a means of food preservation, the history of intentional fermentation by mankind, the range of human and animal foodstuffs produced by fermentation, the production of energy by fermentation, and the cultural/social implications of fermentation.

  • FERM 3700 - Consumer Motivation and Sensory Evaluation of Fermented Foods

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: FERM 1000 and completion of at least 60 hours college credit or 21 years of age at start of class. Fundamentals of sensory evaluation of food and sensory-driven consumer motivation leading to the purchase of fermented foods. Scientific methods of sensory evaluation introduced and practiced and their use in determining critical factors in consumer purchase decisions discussed.

  • Fermentation Science internship experience 3 credit hours
  • Fermentation Science research experience 3 credit hours

 

  • BIOL 1120 - General Biology II  4 credit hours  AND

    BIOL 1120 - General Biology II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111. Corequisite: BIOL 1121. Primarily for Biology majors and minors and other science-oriented students. Survey of plants and animals emphasizing evolution, structure, function, reproduction, growth, and ecology. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • BIOL 2230 - Microbiology  4 credit hours  AND

    BIOL 2230 - Microbiology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111 and BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121 or BIOL 2010/BIOL 2011 and BIOL 2020/BIOL 2021. Concepts and techniques pertaining to the morphology, physiology, reproduction, isolation, cultivation and identification of microorganisms with particular emphasis on bacteria. Topics include the impact of microorganisms in our daily lives, both adverse and beneficial. Background in General Chemistry is strongly recommended. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • BIOL 4510 - Food and Industrial Microbiology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 2230/BIOL 2231 and BIOL 3250/BIOL 3251. Corequisite: BIOL 4511. Interaction between microorganisms and food; industrial processes of importance to humans. Six hours lecture/laboratory.

 

  • CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II  4 credit hours  AND

    CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Corequisite: CHEM 1121. Chemical equilibrium, solid and liquid states of matter, chemistry of acids and bases, principles of chemical kinetics, precipitation reactions, elementary thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • CHEM 2030 - Elements of Organic Chemistry

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1020/CHEM 1021 or CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121. Corequisite: CHEM 2031. Aspects of organic chemistry fundamental to an understanding of reactions in living organisms. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • CHEM 3530 - Principles of Biochemistry

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 2030/CHEM 2031 or CHEM 3010/CHEM 3011. Corequisite: CHEM 3531. Structure, properties, and functions of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids and their reactions in living organisms. Three-hour lecture and one three-hour lab. Does not count toward Biochemistry major.

Specialized Track (21 hours)

Students will select 21 credit hours from the following areas of interest: wine industry, brewing or distillation, fermented dairy foods, fermented meat or baked foods

  • ABAS 2010 - World Food and Society

    3 credit hours

    A global examination of the economic, political, social, and cultural issues related to hunger including war, politics, inequities, malnutrition, population growth, food production, biotechnology, ecological destruction, and food aid. Students will examine personal and societal values concerning world food issues and explore possible directions and solutions for the future. Includes a service learning experience.

  • AGBS 3160 - Value Added Agriculture

    3 credit hours

    A comprehensive analysis of the value-added agricultural industry including marketing farm products directly to consumers.  

  • AGBS 3810 - Milk Processing and Marketing

    3 credit hours

    (Same as ANSC 3810.) Prerequisite: PSCI 1030/PSCI 1031 or CHEM 1010/CHEM 1011 and CHEM 1020/CHEM 1021or CHEM 1110/CHEM 1120 and CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121. Biological, chemical, and physical properties of cow's milk and its value as an animal food source; techniques of processing and marketing; governmental regulations; laboratory testing. Lecture/lab.

  • AGBS 4820 - Principles of Food Processing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PSCI 1030/PSCI 1031 or CHEM 1010/CHEM 1011, and CHEM 1020/CHEM 1021 or CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111 or CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121. Principles used in the modern food industry, including thermal, refrigerated, frozen, and irradiation methods. Includes coverage of the techniques used to process major food commodities such as meats, cereal grains, and fats and oils. Lecture/lab.

  • AGBS 4830 - Food Quality Control

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PSCI 1030/PSCI 1031 and BIOL 1030/BIOL 1031 or approval of instructor. Quality control and sensory evaluation techniques utilized in food processing. Instrumental and physical methods of quality determination of raw and processed food products, hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP), and quality philosophies employed in the industry. Sensory evaluation techniques and statistical analysis of evaluation results covered.

  • AGBS 4850 - Food Safety Issues from Production to Consumption

    3 credit hours

    (Same as NFS 4260.) Prerequisite: BIOL 2230/BIOL 2231 or permission of instructor. Issues impacting food production, food storage and transportation, food processing, and food consumption within food production facilities, the home, and food service facilities. Consumer concerns evaluated based on risk theory and scientific evaluation of safety, including decision-making through critical thinking. Food standards and regulations designed to improve safety of the food supply discussed.

  • FERM 2500 - Wine Appreciation

    3 credit hours

    The fundamentals of wine appreciation, wine label interpretation, and wine judging. Students will evaluate wine products and must be 21 years of age to enroll. Lecture/lab.

  • FERM 2900 - Legal Issues - Fermentation

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisite: FERM 1000. Discussion of the spectrum of law governing alcoholic and non-alcoholic fermentation at the federal, state, and local levels; includes the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1938 (and its successors), the three-tier alcoholic beverage system, and compliance responsibility.

  • FERM 3710 - Brewing, Distilling, and Fermentation Safety and Sanitation

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisites: FERM 1000 and BIOL 4510. Critical principles involved in safely operating and maintaining proper sanitation in a brewing, distilling, or fermenting facility. Participation in class tours of local processing facilities required.

  • FERM 3750 - Facility Design and Operation

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisites: FERM 1000 and FERM 3710. Layout, design, and operation of facilities devoted to the production of fermented foods and beverages. Efficiency, safety, control of contamination, and simultaneous retail operations discussed.

  • FERM 3850 - Wine Science and Industry

    3 credit hours

    (Same as PLSO 3850.) Prerequisites: PLSO 1610 and CHEM 1020/CHEM 1021 or CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121 or PSCI 1030/PSCI 1031. The science and marketing of wine, including grape production, fruit processing, and fermentation technologies. Explores wine marketing in Tennessee, the U.S., and the world. Student must be 21 years of age to enroll. Lecture/lab.

  • FERM 4550 - Brewing, Distilling, and Fermentation Science and Analysis

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisites: FERM 1000, BIOL 4510, and CHEM 3530. Lecture/lab course covering the science of brewing, distilling, and fermentation and the analysis of in-process and finished products.

  • Applied Fermentation: Grains and Biofuels 2 credit hours
  • Applied Fermentation: Milk, Meats, and Baking Science 2 credit hours
  • Applied Fermentation: Fruits and Vegetables 2 credit hours
  • LSTS 4140 - Wine Tourism  3 credit hours  

    LSTS 4140 - Wine Tourism

    3 credit hours

    Familiarizes students with how wine and tourism industry diverge, and indeed converge, across a range of economic, technical, cultural, geographic, and vocational factors.

  • PLSO 4500 - Agroecology  3 credit hours  

    PLSO 4500 - Agroecology

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PLSO 1610 or 4 hours of biology. Theories of agroecology; focuses on sustainable agricultural practices and concepts. The impact of specific agricultural technologies and land use practices on the productivity of agricultural ecosystems, environmental quality, and human health. Examines the environmental science and agronomy of both conventional and alternative sustainable practices including benefits and limitations. Lecture/lab.

 

  • BIOL 4570 - Principles of Toxicology

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111, BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121,  CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111, CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121, and CHEM 3010/CHEM 3011. Corequisite: BIOL 4571. Study of adverse effects of chemical agents on living organisms; current toxicological techniques used in the laboratory. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

Business Foundations (12 hours)

NOTE: Students may count business foundations courses toward the requirements for a minor in Business Administration or Entrepreneurship.

  • ACTG 3000 - Survey of Accounting for General Business

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: A college-level math course; ENGL 1010; sophomore standing. Accounting cycle given minor emphasis; financial statement analysis and managerial uses of accounting given major emphasis. May be used for general business minors or M.B.A. candidates who have had no previous accounting courses. (Not open to Accounting majors and students with credit in ACTG 2110 and ACTG 2120.)

  • BCED 3510 - Business Communication

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing. (Keyboarding skills helpful.) A review of the theory and processes in oral and written business communication. Emphasis on the extensive functions of written and electronic communications.

  • BLAW 3400 - Legal Environment of Business

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing. Legal rights and potential liabilities of business persons. Presentation of the dynamic nature of law in responding to the changing social, ethical, political, regulatory, and international environment. Includes the development and nature of the legal system; business crimes; the law of torts and product liability; constitutional limitations on regulatory powers; legislative, judicial, and administrative control of business activity through the laws of business organizations, securities regulations, antitrust laws, employment laws, labor and safety laws, and consumer protection.

  • ENTR 2900 - Entrepreneurship  3 credit hours  

    ENTR 2900 - Entrepreneurship

    3 credit hours

    The mechanics and operational skills needed for organizing and operating an enterprise.

  • FIN 3000 - Principles of Financial Management

    3 credit hours

    Will not substitute for FIN 3010. An overview of the fundamental concepts and tools for financial decision making within a business firm. (Not open to business majors.)

  • MGMT 3610 - Principles of Management

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing. Concepts of the management functions of planning, organizing, and controlling with an emphasis on behavioral science concepts as applied to managing people in organizations.

  • MKT 3820 - Principles of Marketing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing. Survey of the functions, processes, and institutions involved in the distribution of consumer and industrial goods and services. Decision making in marketing management introduced.

 

  • ENTR 4920 - Small Business Management

    3 credit hours

    (Same as MGMT 4920.) Prerequisites: MGMT 3610 or FIN 3040 and admission to the College of Business. Analysis of problems and considerations involved in planning, organizing, and operating small businesses and entrepreneurial ventures. Emphasis on environmental issues, growth strategies, process management activities, and human resource management.

  • MGMT 4920 - Small Business Management

    3 credit hours

    (Same as ENTR 4920.) Prerequisites: MGMT 3610 and admission to the College of Business. Analysis of problems and considerations involved in planning, organizing, and operating small businesses and entrepreneurial ventures. Emphasis on environmental issues, growth strategies, process management activities, and human resource management.

Electives (10 hours)

Total hours in program: 120

Curriculum: Fermentation Science

Curricular listing includes General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories.

Freshman

  • FERM 1000 - Introduction to Fermentation Science

    3 credit hours

    Survey of fermentation as a means of food preservation, the history of intentional fermentation by mankind, the range of human and animal foodstuffs produced by fermentation, the production of energy by fermentation, and the cultural/social implications of fermentation.

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • Mathematics 3 credit hours (MATH 1730 recommended)
  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 6 credit hours
  • Natural Sciences 4 credit hours (CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111 recommended)

 

  • CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II  4 credit hours  AND

    CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Corequisite: CHEM 1121. Chemical equilibrium, solid and liquid states of matter, chemistry of acids and bases, principles of chemical kinetics, precipitation reactions, elementary thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 29 Hours

Sophomore

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

 

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

  • FERM 3700 - Consumer Motivation and Sensory Evaluation of Fermented Foods

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: FERM 1000 and completion of at least 60 hours college credit or 21 years of age at start of class. Fundamentals of sensory evaluation of food and sensory-driven consumer motivation leading to the purchase of fermented foods. Scientific methods of sensory evaluation introduced and practiced and their use in determining critical factors in consumer purchase decisions discussed.

  • FERM specialized course 3 credit hours
  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 6 credit hours
  • Natural Sciences 4 credit hours (BIOL 1110 BIOL 1111 recommended)

 

  • BIOL 1120 - General Biology II  4 credit hours  AND

    BIOL 1120 - General Biology II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111. Corequisite: BIOL 1121. Primarily for Biology majors and minors and other science-oriented students. Survey of plants and animals emphasizing evolution, structure, function, reproduction, growth, and ecology. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • CHEM 2030 - Elements of Organic Chemistry

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1020/CHEM 1021 or CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121. Corequisite: CHEM 2031. Aspects of organic chemistry fundamental to an understanding of reactions in living organisms. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 33 Hours

Junior

  • BIOL 2230 - Microbiology  4 credit hours  AND

    BIOL 2230 - Microbiology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111 and BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121 or BIOL 2010/BIOL 2011 and BIOL 2020/BIOL 2021. Concepts and techniques pertaining to the morphology, physiology, reproduction, isolation, cultivation and identification of microorganisms with particular emphasis on bacteria. Topics include the impact of microorganisms in our daily lives, both adverse and beneficial. Background in General Chemistry is strongly recommended. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

 

  • BIOL 4510 - Food and Industrial Microbiology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 2230/BIOL 2231 and BIOL 3250/BIOL 3251. Corequisite: BIOL 4511. Interaction between microorganisms and food; industrial processes of importance to humans. Six hours lecture/laboratory.

 

  • CHEM 3530 - Principles of Biochemistry

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 2030/CHEM 2031 or CHEM 3010/CHEM 3011. Corequisite: CHEM 3531. Structure, properties, and functions of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids and their reactions in living organisms. Three-hour lecture and one three-hour lab. Does not count toward Biochemistry major.

 

  • FERM specialized courses 9 credit hours
  • Business foundation courses 9 credit hours

Subtotal: 30 Hours

Senior

  • Business foundation courses 3 credit hours
  • FERM specialized courses 9 credit hours
  • Electives 10 credit hours
  • FERM research experience 3 credit hours
  • FERM internship experience 3 credit hours

Subtotal: 28 Hours

FERM 1000 - Introduction to Fermentation Science
3 credit hours

Survey of fermentation as a means of food preservation, the history of intentional fermentation by mankind, the range of human and animal foodstuffs produced by fermentation, the production of energy by fermentation, and the cultural/social implications of fermentation.

FERM 2500 - Wine Appreciation
3 credit hours

The fundamentals of wine appreciation, wine label interpretation, and wine judging. Students will evaluate wine products and must be 21 years of age to enroll. Lecture/lab.

FERM 2900 - Legal Issues - Fermentation
2 credit hours

Prerequisite: FERM 1000. Discussion of the spectrum of law governing alcoholic and non-alcoholic fermentation at the federal, state, and local levels; includes the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1938 (and its successors), the three-tier alcoholic beverage system, and compliance responsibility.

FERM 3200 - International Wine Industry
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: FERM 2500 or permission of instructor. Introduces the wine industry of a country other than the U.S; taught onsite in the host country. Wine industry from the ground up explored--from the nurseries which propagate grapevines, to the vineyards that produce the grapes, to the wineries that produce and market the wines. Marketing of host country wines, domestically and abroad, studied. Participants must be 21 years of age to enroll. Combined lecture/lab.  

FERM 3700 - Consumer Motivation and Sensory Evaluation of Fermented
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: FERM 1000 and completion of at least 60 hours college credit or 21 years of age at start of class. Fundamentals of sensory evaluation of food and sensory-driven consumer motivation leading to the purchase of fermented foods. Scientific methods of sensory evaluation introduced and practiced and their use in determining critical factors in consumer purchase decisions discussed.

FERM 3710 - Brewing, Distilling, and Fermentation Safety and Sanita
2 credit hours

Prerequisites: FERM 1000 and BIOL 4510. Critical principles involved in safely operating and maintaining proper sanitation in a brewing, distilling, or fermenting facility. Participation in class tours of local processing facilities required.

FERM 3750 - Facility Design and Operation
2 credit hours

Prerequisites: FERM 1000 and FERM 3710. Layout, design, and operation of facilities devoted to the production of fermented foods and beverages. Efficiency, safety, control of contamination, and simultaneous retail operations discussed.

FERM 3850 - Wine Science and Industry
3 credit hours

(Same as PLSO 3850.) Prerequisites: PLSO 1610 and CHEM 1020/CHEM 1021 or CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121 or PSCI 1030/PSCI 1031. The science and marketing of wine, including grape production, fruit processing, and fermentation technologies. Explores wine marketing in Tennessee, the U.S., and the world. Student must be 21 years of age to enroll. Lecture/lab.

FERM 4550 - Brewing, Distilling, and Fermentation Science and Analy
2 credit hours

Prerequisites: FERM 1000, BIOL 4510, and CHEM 3530. Lecture/lab course covering the science of brewing, distilling, and fermentation and the analysis of in-process and finished products.

FERM 4800 - International Fermented Foods
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: FERM 1000, FERM 2900, and FERM 3700; junior standing. Study abroad course introducing students to the range of fermented food products produced worldwide. Students tour fermented food production facilities, explore the marketing of fermented foods, and visit with principal business leaders involved in the fermented foods industry.

Contact and Student Information

Dr. Tony V. Johnston
tony.johnston@mtsu.edu
615-898-2421

Dr. Tony V. Johnston
tony.johnston@mtsu.edu
615-898-2421

School of Agribusiness and Agriscience
MTSU Box 5
1301 East Main Street
Murfreesboro, TN 37132

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