• The M.Ed. in English as a Second Language is delivered online
  • Multi-lingual classrooms are typical in today’s world
  • Dr. Dorothy Craig works with individuals to meet their needs
  • MTSU’s program for teaching second language learners takes a literacy-based approach

English as a Second Language, Curriculum and Instruction, M.Ed.

A look into any public school classroom across the state or nation would reveal a variety of learners with specific needs. It is a common occurrence for a highly gifted English speaker, a special needs student, and students whose first languages may reflect Arabic, Burmese, Farsi, Kurdish, Somali, Spanish, and Swahili (to name a few) to be working together. The multi-lingual classroom is now typical instead of unique. The challenges posed by the classroom structures and populations require teachers to gain knowledge and understanding while developing expertise in the areas of second language acquisition, appropriate strategies and models for effective instruction, assessment tools and accommodations, and literacy frameworks, practices, and overall language learning. In addition, today’s classrooms require educators to become skillful examiners in order to conduct classroom action research that leads to improved practice and teacher efficacy. The M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction in English as a Second Language is delivered online.

Program increases knowledge, opens doors

Program increases knowledge, opens doors

Daiva Berzinskas earned an M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction with Concentration and Licensure in English as a Second Language in 2009. “Before starting this program, I had worked as an ESL (English as a Second Language) instructor and IELTS (International English Language Testing System) coordinator at a private English language education company. Although I had plenty of experience teaching English, I was limited in job opportunities without licensure,” she recalls. She also says the program filled the void in her knowledge of pedagogy and made her much more effective as a teacher. “It taught me how to build an effective curriculum and ESL program for students and the community. Currently, I work as director of International Programs and ELL (English Language Learning) at The Webb School in Bell Buckle.” In addition, she works for The Lincoln Library of Essential Information, creating supplemental lesson plans for ELL students to use in core subjects, and also as a consultant for a private school in North Carolina, helping build an ELL program for its growing number of international students. She also has served on a bias review committee for TOEFL, Jr., with ETS, in Princeton, New Jersey.

Individual seeking safety continues as a language teacher

Individual seeking safety continues as a language teacher

Ahmad Jeddeeni came to the United Stated from Damascus, Syria, under a political asylum program. He had been teaching Arabic to English-speaking personnel at the U.S. Embassy when it was attacked some years ago. U.S. personnel helped him escape, but he lost touch with his family for a while. In 2015, he graduated with a Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction with an English as a Second Language (ESL) concentration. Now Jeddeeni credits his experiences at MTSU with his successes. “Right before I graduated, I received a job offer from Grand Valley State University where I currently work as a visiting Arabic professor. I am very grateful for the enriching experience I had during the two years I spent at MTSU. The M.Ed. degree that I earned not only helped me advance professionally, but it also provided me with essential academic tools to continue further studies and research in the language teaching field,” Jeddeeni says.

The M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction with Concentration and Licensure in ESL offers preparation to candidates to teach in public schools, private schools, and faith-based learning environments. The program also seeks to prepare teachers to work with early learners who are also second language learners in preschool settings, nursery school settings, and early learning classrooms. Candidates who successfully complete the program meet requirements for the Pre-K through 12th grade professional license in ESL.

In addition to teaching in public, private, faith-based, and preschool classrooms, the program enables graduates to pursue the following careers:

  • Adjunct professor
  • Curriculum writer for PreK-12
  • ESL curriculum design for PreK-12
  • ESL instructional consultant
  • ESL instructor
  • Faith-based ESL coordinator
  • Faith-based ESL teacher (missionary)
  • Lead teacher in ESL
  • PreK ESL coordinator 

Employers of MTSU Alumni include, but are not limited to, the following: 

Public Schools - Tennessee 

  • Bedford County Schools
  • Cannon County Schools
  • Coffee County Schools
  • Dekalb County School District
  • Franklin County Schools
  • Franklin Special Schools District
  • Giles County Schools
  • Hamilton County Schools
  • Knox County Schools
  • Lawrence County School District
  • Lebanon School District
  • Lincoln County Schools
  • Marshall County School District
  • Maury County School District
  • Memphis School District
  • Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools
  • Moore County Schools
  • Murfreesboro City Schools
  • Robertson County School District
  • Rutherford County School District
  • Shelby County Schools
  • Smith County School District
  • Tullahoma School District
  • Warren County Schools
  • Williamson County School
  • Wilson County School District

Public Schools – Outside of Tennessee

  • Boston Public Schools
  • New York City Department of Education

Private Schools

  • Franklin Road Academy
  • The Webb School 

Other

  • Cumberland University
  • ELS Nashville
  • Grand Valley State University
  • International English Institute
  • Middle Tennessee State University
  • Motlow State Community College
  • Nashville State Community College
  • Tennessee Foreign Language Institute
  • Tennessee Technological University
  • Tennessee State University

This online licensure-based program, offered by the Womack Educational Leadership Department and leading to a Master’s of Education (M.Ed.) with a major in Curriculum and Instruction and a concentration in English as a Second Language is designed for: a) candidates seeking the master’s degree with Add-on Endorsement in ESL, b) candidates seeking the Initial Professional License in ESL, and c) candidates seeking the Add-On Endorsement in ESL (without degree).

The M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction with concentration and licensure in ESL focuses on preparing professional educators to meet the needs of students who are currently enrolled in U.S. public school classrooms in grades PreK-12. These populations may include students who represent immigrant populations, newly arriving non-English speakers, children of immigrants, and diverse populations with a variety of language and learning needs. The program is designed specifically for teachers and those who plan to teach second language learners in multilingual classrooms within the U.S. 

Coursework is aligned with the Tennessee Department of Education Professional Licensure Standards for ESL and the CAEP Standards and Professional Dispositions for public school educators. The program takes a literacy-based approach to teaching ELs and is grounded in state and national education initiatives. The program is revised on an ongoing basis to reflect current practice.

This program is delivered online and does not prepare candidates to work exclusively with adult learners in EFL settings.  

For complete curriculum details, click on the REQUIREMENTS tab above.  

A Master of Education (M.Ed.) with a major in Curriculum and Instruction is offered.

The department also offers a major in Curriculum and Instruction leading to the Specialist in Education degree (Ed.S.) with a specialization in Culture, Cognition, and the Learning Process.

Also available are both on- and off-campus cohorts

Other graduate degrees

The Womack Educational Leadership Department offers both the Master of Education (M.Ed.) and Specialist in Education (Ed.S.) with a major in Administration and Supervision. The specialization in Higher Education can lead to either an Ed.S. or M.Ed. Students choose either a research or practicum path. 

There is also an Instructional Leader Licensure program specialization delivered through off-campus cohorts meeting at various locations. 

Also under the Administration and Supervision major is a concentration in Agricultural Education Leadership leading to the M.Ed.

The major in Library Science leads to a Master in Library Science (M.L.S.) 

A major in Professional Counseling includes programs leading to an M.Ed., with concentrations also available in Clinical Mental Health Counseling and School Counseling.

Curriculum and Instruction, English as a Second Language Concentration, M.Ed.

Dorothy Valcarcel Craig, Program Director
(615) 898-2855
Dorothy.Craig@mtsu.edu, www.eslatmtsu.com

The M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction offers a concentration in English as a Second Language with several licensure options as well as a non-licensure option:

  • The degree with add-on licensure endorsement in ESL (PreK-12) is designed for those candidates who already hold an initial license for teaching in Tennessee;
  • The degree with initial license in ESL (PreK-12) is designed for those candidates who do not hold an initial license for teaching in Tennessee and who plan to complete the requirements for professional licensure at the initial level;
  • The add-on only program may be completed for endorsement only (non-degree; licensure only);
  • The M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction also offers a specialization for the professional education coursework for teacher licensure (Secondary Education Licensure Path) in a state-approved licensure

Please see undergraduate catalog for information regarding undergraduate programs.

Admission Requirements

For admission into the master’s program, a satisfactory score on the Miller Analogies Test, the Graduate Record Examination, or the Praxis II (Principles of Learning and Teaching) or a valid Tennessee Teacher license is required.

Students pursuing an M.Ed. degree must be fully admitted to the program prior to the completion of their initial semester of coursework.

Application Procedures

All application materials are to be submitted to the College of Graduate Studies.

Applicant must

  1. submit an application with the appropriate application fee (online at www.mtsu.edu/graduate/apply.php);
  2. submit official transcripts of all previous college work;
  3. submit three letters of recommendation addressing the applicant's potential for completing the Master of Education degree in Curriculum and Instruction;
  4. submit official scores on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or Miller Analogies Test (MAT) or a copy of the teaching license.

Degree Requirements with Add-On Endorsement in ESL or Non-Licensure Option

The Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction with a concentration in English as a Second Language requires completion of 33 semester hours. No more than 30 percent of the total degree hours may be dually listed as undergraduate/graduate hours.

Candidate must

  1. hold a bachelor's degree;
  2. hold an initial Tennessee teaching license. Non-licensure students must meet entry testing requirements for graduate studies (MAT or GRE score).
  3. successfully complete a written comprehensive examination during the semester of graduation (exam may be retaken once during a subsequent semester).

Curriculum: Curriculum and Instruction, English as a Second Language with Add-On Endorsement in ESL or Non-Licensure Option

 Candidate must complete 33 hours in the following course of study:

Core Courses (15 hours)

 

  • FOED 6610 - Analysis and Application of Educational Research

    3 credit hours

    Qualitative and quantitative research applicable to the field of education. Both producers and consumers of educational research with a literature review presented to support possible solutions to significant hypotheses or problems.

  • FOED 6620 - Action Research for Practitioner-Based Learning Environments

    3 credit hours

    Examination of action research processes as related and applied to practitioner-required and work-based settings. Design and implementation of an IRB-approved action research study related to a selected learning environment.

  • FOED 6860 - Education and Digital Youth: Language Learning in a Participatory Culture

    3 credit hours

    Examines the impact of digital media and the current school-aged population of English language learners. Emphasis on language learning and instruction using a variety of online media, developing multiple literacies, and designing appropriate language and content instruction using appropriate web tools.

  • SPSE 6430 - Introduction to Curriculum Development

    3 credit hours

    Opportunity to study, discuss, and evaluate modern practices and procedures in curriculum development and reorganization in schools and school systems.

Required Courses (18 hours)

 

  • SPSE 6800 - Curriculum Design and Instruction for ELs

    3 credit hours

    Analysis of curriculum models for instruction in the EL classroom. Considers elements of differentiated instruction, transformative literacy frameworks, and standards-based content in lesson planning, embedded assessment tasks, and units plans with appropriate accommodations and adjustments for second language learners. Fieldwork required.

  • SPSE 6820 - SLA: Language, Culture, Theory, Practice

    3 credit hours

    Focus on specific theories and research pertaining to second language acquisition for the PreK-12 EL and regular education classroom teacher. Emphasis on cultural aspects that influence language acquisition, elements of language, sound systems, cognitive processes, and the psychology of language learning. Required for add-on endorsement in ESL.

  • SPSE 6830 - Assessment and Evaluation of English Language Learners

    3 credit hours

    Examines the role of assessment in the education of linguistically diverse students in the PreK-12 classroom. Focus on formal and informal methods of assessing language proficiency, state and national testing initiatives, test preparation, and interpretation of test results. Fieldwork required.

  • SPSE 6712 - Fieldwork and Professional Collaboration in ESL Classrooms

    3 credit hours

    A field-based course for English as a Second Language teachers. Examines issues, professionalism, and challenges for working with ELs in public school classrooms. Emphasis on professional collaboration with mentors, community members, and ethnographic practices as a means for building advocacy and improving classroom situations for ELs.

  • YOED 6020 - Literacy and Content Instruction for ELs

    3 credit hours

    Analysis and application of strategies, instructional methods, and techniques appropriate for developing and implementing transformative literacy and standards-based content instruction for English learners in the classroom. Focus on state and nationally adopted models for addressing culture within integrated language and academic content lessons and unit plans. Fieldwork required.

  • YOED 6030 - Methods, Instruction, and Assessment for Teaching ELs in Regular Education Classrooms

    3 credit hours

    Focuses on meeting the varied needs of English learners within the regular education (non-ESL) classroom. Examines appropriate accommodations, curriculum adjustments, techniques for building academic language within content instruction, communicative group work, differentiation, and formative assessment strategies to identify needs to inform instruction. Emphasis placed on collaboration between the regular education teacher and the ESL professional.

Degree Requirements for Initial Licensure in ESL

The Masters of Education in Curriculum and Instruction with a concentration in English as a Second Language (with initial license) requires completion of 33 semester hours and 9 hours of Directed Student Teaching. No more than 30 percent of the total degree hours may be dually listed as undergraduate/graduate hours.

Candidates must:

  1. hold a bachelor's degree;
  2. meet entry testing requirements for Graduate Studies (MAT or GRE score);
  3. meet requirements for admission to Teacher Education;
  4. successfully complete one semester of Directed Student Teaching;
  5. successfully complete a written comprehensive examination during the semester of graduation (exam may be retaken once during subsequent semester).

Curriculum: Curriculum and Instruction, English as a Second Language with Initial Licensure in ESL

Candidates must complete 42 hours in the following course of study:

Core Courses (15 hours)

 

  • FOED 6610 - Analysis and Application of Educational Research

    3 credit hours

    Qualitative and quantitative research applicable to the field of education. Both producers and consumers of educational research with a literature review presented to support possible solutions to significant hypotheses or problems.

  • FOED 6620 - Action Research for Practitioner-Based Learning Environments

    3 credit hours

    Examination of action research processes as related and applied to practitioner-required and work-based settings. Design and implementation of an IRB-approved action research study related to a selected learning environment.

  • FOED 6860 - Education and Digital Youth: Language Learning in a Participatory Culture

    3 credit hours

    Examines the impact of digital media and the current school-aged population of English language learners. Emphasis on language learning and instruction using a variety of online media, developing multiple literacies, and designing appropriate language and content instruction using appropriate web tools.

  • SPSE 6430 - Introduction to Curriculum Development

    3 credit hours

    Opportunity to study, discuss, and evaluate modern practices and procedures in curriculum development and reorganization in schools and school systems.

Required Courses (18 hours)

 

  • SPSE 6800 - Curriculum Design and Instruction for ELs

    3 credit hours

    Analysis of curriculum models for instruction in the EL classroom. Considers elements of differentiated instruction, transformative literacy frameworks, and standards-based content in lesson planning, embedded assessment tasks, and units plans with appropriate accommodations and adjustments for second language learners. Fieldwork required.

  • SPSE 6820 - SLA: Language, Culture, Theory, Practice

    3 credit hours

    Focus on specific theories and research pertaining to second language acquisition for the PreK-12 EL and regular education classroom teacher. Emphasis on cultural aspects that influence language acquisition, elements of language, sound systems, cognitive processes, and the psychology of language learning. Required for add-on endorsement in ESL.

  • SPSE 6830 - Assessment and Evaluation of English Language Learners

    3 credit hours

    Examines the role of assessment in the education of linguistically diverse students in the PreK-12 classroom. Focus on formal and informal methods of assessing language proficiency, state and national testing initiatives, test preparation, and interpretation of test results. Fieldwork required.

  • SPSE 6712 - Fieldwork and Professional Collaboration in ESL Classrooms

    3 credit hours

    A field-based course for English as a Second Language teachers. Examines issues, professionalism, and challenges for working with ELs in public school classrooms. Emphasis on professional collaboration with mentors, community members, and ethnographic practices as a means for building advocacy and improving classroom situations for ELs.

  • YOED 6020 - Literacy and Content Instruction for ELs

    3 credit hours

    Analysis and application of strategies, instructional methods, and techniques appropriate for developing and implementing transformative literacy and standards-based content instruction for English learners in the classroom. Focus on state and nationally adopted models for addressing culture within integrated language and academic content lessons and unit plans. Fieldwork required.

  • YOED 6030 - Methods, Instruction, and Assessment for Teaching ELs in Regular Education Classrooms

    3 credit hours

    Focuses on meeting the varied needs of English learners within the regular education (non-ESL) classroom. Examines appropriate accommodations, curriculum adjustments, techniques for building academic language within content instruction, communicative group work, differentiation, and formative assessment strategies to identify needs to inform instruction. Emphasis placed on collaboration between the regular education teacher and the ESL professional.

Directed Student Teaching (9 hours)

 

English as a Second Language Add-On Endorsement (non-degree)

Candidates for the Add-On Endorsement (non-degree) program must:

  1. hold a bachelor's degree;
  2. hold an initial license for teaching in Tennessee.

Required Courses (12 hours)

Candidates must complete 12 hours in the following course of study. The licensure coursework may be transferred to the full degree program. Please check with current catalog for program changes and updates.

  • SPSE 6712 - Fieldwork and Professional Collaboration in ESL Classrooms

    3 credit hours

    A field-based course for English as a Second Language teachers. Examines issues, professionalism, and challenges for working with ELs in public school classrooms. Emphasis on professional collaboration with mentors, community members, and ethnographic practices as a means for building advocacy and improving classroom situations for ELs.

  • SPSE 6800 - Curriculum Design and Instruction for ELs

    3 credit hours

    Analysis of curriculum models for instruction in the EL classroom. Considers elements of differentiated instruction, transformative literacy frameworks, and standards-based content in lesson planning, embedded assessment tasks, and units plans with appropriate accommodations and adjustments for second language learners. Fieldwork required.

  • SPSE 6820 - SLA: Language, Culture, Theory, Practice

    3 credit hours

    Focus on specific theories and research pertaining to second language acquisition for the PreK-12 EL and regular education classroom teacher. Emphasis on cultural aspects that influence language acquisition, elements of language, sound systems, cognitive processes, and the psychology of language learning. Required for add-on endorsement in ESL.

  • SPSE 6830 - Assessment and Evaluation of English Language Learners

    3 credit hours

    Examines the role of assessment in the education of linguistically diverse students in the PreK-12 classroom. Focus on formal and informal methods of assessing language proficiency, state and national testing initiatives, test preparation, and interpretation of test results. Fieldwork required.

  • YOED 6020 - Literacy and Content Instruction for ELs

    3 credit hours

    Analysis and application of strategies, instructional methods, and techniques appropriate for developing and implementing transformative literacy and standards-based content instruction for English learners in the classroom. Focus on state and nationally adopted models for addressing culture within integrated language and academic content lessons and unit plans. Fieldwork required.

  • YOED 6030 - Methods, Instruction, and Assessment for Teaching ELs in Regular Education Classrooms

    3 credit hours

    Focuses on meeting the varied needs of English learners within the regular education (non-ESL) classroom. Examines appropriate accommodations, curriculum adjustments, techniques for building academic language within content instruction, communicative group work, differentiation, and formative assessment strategies to identify needs to inform instruction. Emphasis placed on collaboration between the regular education teacher and the ESL professional.

Program Notes

Students taking courses for licensure renewal, add-on endorsements, or "plus 30" upgrade on teacher licensure should register as non-degree-seeking students, Students enrolling in 6000-level courses must hold a bachelor's degree, and students enrolling in 7000-level courses must hold a master's degree. Non-degree-seeking students cannot register for 7000-level courses without departmental permission.

Candidates must:

  1. file a degree plan in the College of Graduate Studies prior to entry into the program;
  2. file a Notice of Intent to Graduate form in the College of Graduate Studies within the first two weeks of the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

 

Add-On Endorsement in English as a Second Language – PreK-12th grade

Middle Tennessee State University offers the Add-on Endorsement in English as a Second Language, which is specifically designed to prepare initially-licensed teachers to work with English learners in public school classrooms. 

Program FAQs for Teachers, Administrators, and Undergraduates 

What are the program requirements? 

The Add-On Endorsement in ESL is an ONLINE program. All classes are delivered online through the Desire@Learn course management system. Requirements include successful completion of 12 hours of prescribed graduate classes, successful completion of the PRAXIS II / ESL Specialty Area Exam and the application for licensure (submitted to the Office of Professional Lab Experiences). 

Which classes should I take?

The following classes are required for the Add-On Endorsement in ESL

  • SPSE 6820 – Language, Culture, Theory & Practice
  • SPSE 6830 – Assessment & Evaluation of ELs
  • SPSE 6712 –  Fieldwork & Professional Collaboration in the ESL Classroom
  • YOED 6020 – Literacy & Content Instruction for ELs

How do I enroll in classes?

To enroll in classes you must first apply as a non-degree seeking / licensure only student to MTSU Graduate Studies. All that is needed is your application and application fee.

What is the cost of the program and is there any financial assistance available?

Please visit the tuition website for more information regarding tuition and fees. This program is not an eCampus program. Please contact the MTSU Financial Aid Office to inquire about any funding that you may qualify for.

When are the classes offered and how long will it take to complete the endorsement?

Classes for the Add-On Endorsement in ESL are offered in Fall and Spring semesters. We are willing to work with schools and systems include additional offerings for possible cohorts. Please contact Dr. Craig at Dorothy.Craig@mtsu.edu for more information. See prescribed list of courses by viewing the Add-On Endorsement flyer.

Can I apply to the program as an undergraduate?

If you are currently enrolled in a teacher preparation program at the undergraduate level AND if you are in your last semester (Residency II), then you may apply to MTSU Graduate Studies as a non-degree seeking / licensure only student. Once you are admitted to Graduate Studies—you may begin taking classes. However, your initial license requirements must be met and the application submitted to the Tennessee Department of Education BEFORE you can submit your Add-On Endorsement application. This means that once you graduate with you B.S.—you may begin taking graduate classes but cannot submit the endorsement paperwork until you have completed all requirements and until you receive your Initial License.

Vision of English as a Second Language Teacher Preparation Programs

MTSU’s Masters with Concentration in ESL and Add-On Endorsement in English as a Second Language programs seek to prepare candidates who are have the skills, knowledge and dispositions that enable them to create welcoming, safe, and secure learning environments that encourage language acquisition, language use, literacy, and academic success within the today’s linguistically and culturally diverse classrooms.

Mission

The program mission seeks to prepare knowledgeable professional educators who have the ability to meet the needs of second language learners including immigrant children, children of immigrants, refugees, asylum seekers, and lifelong English learners.  In addition, the program’s mission is to equip a new teaching force with the skills and abilities needed to rise to the challenges posed by multilingual classrooms and to serve as advocates and community partners to assist English learners in becoming successful and productive members of our society.  The program endeavors to support the mission and values of the College of Education and the university in continuing to serve as leaders in the preparation of educators across the state and nation.

The mission encompasses the following key elements that are critically important to professional educators of second language learners:

  • Engage in practitioner-based action research with the goal of improving practice for English learners as well as all learners in public school classrooms;
  • Apply skills, knowledge, and dispositions needed to serve as advocates for English learners, their families, the community in which they live, building relationships that lead to community literacy, and in creating and providing learning environments conducive to language learning and literacy development;
  • Embrace opportunities for professional collaboration with practitioners, administrators, and school leaders with the goal of meeting the needs of English learners;
  • Serve as leaders in helping to build appreciation for culturally and linguistic diversity in our classrooms;
  • Seek out partnerships that support English learners and their families beyond the PreK-12 learning environment.

The program supports the mission of the College of Education with student-centered learning environments through:

  • Excellence in teaching,
  • Applied practitioner-based classroom research,
  • Creative endeavors,
  • Meaningful advisement,
  • Mentorship from practitioners, and
  • Field-based collaboration.

Goals

The ESL program goals include:

  • Providing a graduate program that meets the needs of practicing teachers and the growing number of English learners in schools across the state;
  • Establishing strong partnerships and collaborative field-based practices with public schools in order to keep deliver up-to-date content, support, and mentoring that reflects today’s classrooms;
  • Engaging candidates in relevant coursework that includes a well-rounded blend of theory, application, practice, and self-reflection;
  • Delivering a dynamic overall program that enables candidates to build skills, knowledge, and dispositions needed to be able to realize self-efficacy, promote literacy, and become lifelong advocates for second language learners.

Values

The program is aligned with the Core Values outlines by TESOL—a professional international organization dedicated to advancing the quality of English language teaching through professional development, research, standards, and advocacy.  The program holds the following core values adapted from TESOL Core Values (2017):

  • Professionalism demonstrated by excellence in standards, research, and practice that improve learning outcomes, learning environments, and opportunities for second language learners;
  • Respect for diversity, gender, religious diversity, multilingualism, multiculturalism, and individuals’ language and civil rights
  • Integrity guided by ethically sound actions
  • Commitment to life-long learning and advocacy for second language learners 

How MTSU Maintains Its Standards in the M.Ed. C&I ESL and Add-On Endorsement in ESL Programs

Triangulation of Ongoing Improvement Data Collection and Analysis Cycle

Target Fall Data Sets Spring Data Sets Summer Data Sets
Course Effectiveness and Relevancy Feedback for Ongoing Improvement
  • Course Evaluation for Ongoing Improvement Anonymous Survey
  • Anonymous Feedback Forum
  • Comments, Questions, and Communication with Students
  • Alumni Surveys
  • Course Evaluation for Ongoing Improvement Anonymous Survey
  • Anonymous Feedback Forum
  • Comments, Questions, and Communication  with Students
  • Alumni Surveys
  • Course Evaluation for Ongoing Improvement Anonymous Survey
  • Anonymous Feedback Forum
  • Comments, Questions, and Communication with Students
  • Alumni Surveys
Effectiveness of Field Experiences
  • Mentor Feedback Survey
  • Candidate Feedback Survey
  • Candidate Portfolio
  • Discussions with Mentors to prepare for upcoming Fall Semester
 
Evaluation of Candidates by Mentors in Fieldwork Class
  • Evaluation of Candidate Survey completed by Mentor
   
Effectiveness of Mentor and Mentoring
  • Evaluation of Mentor Survey completed by Candidate
   
Meeting School System Needs
  • ESL Coordinator Survey
  • Questions and Comments Gathered as a Result of Onsite Recruitment and Presentation
  • ESL Coordinator Survey
  • Questions and Comments Gathered as a Result of Onsite Recruitment and Presentation
  • Discussions with ESL Coordinators to prepare for upcoming academic year

 

Use of Data to Inform the Continuous Improvement Process

Ongoing Data Collection Fall, Spring, Summer > Ongoing Data Analysis at the End of Each Semester > May-June Tasks and Action Plans > August Tasks, Revisions to Coursework > Implementation of Action Plans

  • End of Each Semester:  The program director conducts a thorough analysis of all qualitative data and completes a comparison of program data, program goals, alignment, and results from candidate assessments in order to identify any gaps, weaknesses, and/or revisions to coursework needed.
  • End of Each Semester: The program director also conducts a systematic analysis of qualitative data using the constant comparative framework in order to identify patterns and themes that may inform the continuous improvement process.
  • May-June: The program director conducts a comparative analysis of the program goals, targets, and student assessment results.  An Action Plan for each target area not met is designed and implemented.  If available—alumni data are evaluated, compared, and integrated into revisions to curriculum.
  • July-August: Revisions and adjustments are completed based on data analyses and results.  The implementation of Action Plans begins with the start of the new academic year and the process continues in a cyclical manner.

Fieldwork Materials

Candidates for licensure must complete fieldwork related to assignments in each of the ESL Concentration courses.  In addition, to meet the requirement for field-based experience—all candidates complete SPSE 6712: Fieldwork and Professional Collaboration in ESL Classrooms.  This course is required for the following programs and meets the requirement for Residency I for Initial Licensure.

  • M.Ed. in Curriculum & Instruction with Concentration and Add-On Endorsement in ESL PreK-12
  • M.Ed. in Curriculum & Instruction with Concentration and Initial License in ESL PreK-12
  • Add-On Endorsement in ESL PreK-12

Fieldwork Materials For Mentors

Fieldwork Materials for Students

Contact and Student Information

Dr. Dorothy Valcarcel Craig
615-898-2332
Dorothy.craig@mtsu.edu
Dr. Dorothy Valcarcel Craig
615-898-2332
Dorothy.craig@mtsu.edu

Womack Educational Leadership

College of Graduate Studies

Department of Educational Leadership
Middle Tennessee State University
MTSU Box 91
Murfreesboro, TN 37132 

College of Graduate Studies
Middle Tennessee State University
MTSU Box 42
1301 East Main Street
Murfreesboro, TN 37132

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