• Majors can choose among commercial, electrical, or residential construction
  • Industry involvement assures that the program stays current
  • Second Lt. Kimberly Isham earned a B.S. in Construction Management
  • This class is learning about surveying a property boundary

Construction Management

Owning a home or a business has been part of the American Dream since the country's founding. But residences and office parks don't build themselves. At MTSU, students learn the wide range of skills it takes to help provide the homes, communities, office buildings, and other construction projects that are the literal foundation of the American Dream.

This program is approved for the Academic Common Market.

Competing to learn

Competing to learn

The phrase “Residential Construction Management Competition” may be mouthful, but for students seeking a degree in Construction Management, the annual national contest presents an unequalled opportunity. Members of the competition team learn firsthand what it takes to put together a winning development proposal. During the last decade, MTSU's team has been dominant, placing at least in the top nine and winning the competition outright in 2007 and 2012.

Calling all women

Calling all women

In many science and engineering fields, female students too often overlook the opportunities and pay potential. That is true of the jobs available to graduates with a degree in Construction Management. “As a woman home builder and land developer, I have found that home building is a truly rewarding career in so many ways, not the least of which is earning potential,” says Peggy Krebs, president of Elite Homes and one of the industry's many supporters of the program. The path to that earning potential and career satisfaction starts right here.

A degree in Construction Management prepares students for entry-level careers in land development and residential home building construction industry. Examples include

  • Construction business manager
  • Construction foreman
  • Construction materials salesperson
  • Construction superintendent
  • Electrical contractor
  • Electrical materials and equipment salesperson
  • Estimator
  • Homeowner's warranty manager
  • Land development manager
  • Land development sales and marketing
  • Mechanical contractor
  • PreFab housing industry builder
  • Project manager
  • Purchaser
  • Quality control manager

Employers of MTSU alumni include

  • Barlow Exteriors
  • Batson Homes
  • Beazer Homes
  • CPS Land
  • Civil Constructors
  • Farmers Insurance
  • Goodall Homes
  • Grant New Homes
  • Huskey Truss
  • Magnolia Homes
  • Regent Homes
  • TDK Construction
  • TVA
  • Tennessee Valley Homes
  • The Jones Company
  • The Pulte Group

Students in the Construction Management program can pursue a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree with a concentration in Commercial Construction Management, Electrical Construction Management, or Land Development/Residential Building Construction Management.

For complete curriculum details, click on the REQUIREMENTS tab above.

Students interested in studying architecture may take a set of courses that allows completion of up to 24 general education hours commonly found in accredited architecture programs, but it is necessary to transfer to another university to complete a degree in architecture.  

There is an undergraduate minor in Construction Management.

Another major in the School of Concrete and Construction Management leading to a B.S. degree is Concrete Industry Management. Majors choose between two concentrations: Concrete Contracting or Production, Sales, and Service.

Working with the paving industry, the School of Concrete and Construction Management has developed a certificate program in Road Construction Technology and anticipates considering applicants for this program in 2017. 

Graduate students can pursue a Master of Business Administration (M.B.A. degree) in Concrete Industry Management with five years of work experience required (degree offered in conjunction with the Management Department in the Jones College of Business).

Electrical Construction Land Development/Residential Building Construction   Commercial Construction Management


Construction Management, Electrical Construction Management Concentration, B.S.

School of Concrete and Construction Management 
615-898-2781
David Hatfield
David.Hatfiel@mtsu.edu

The Construction Management major is a broad-based program designed to prepare students for positions in the construction industry. Corporate and private construction companies seek graduates to fill job positions in the field and in management. Students may select from three concentrations: Land Development/Residential Building Construction Management, Electrical Construction Management, and Commercial Construction Management. The merging of a strong technical background with the ability to lead personnel and manage systems produces a graduate who is invaluable to the construction industry.

The Electrical Construction Management concentration is a result of the collective efforts of the National Joint Apprenticeship Training Committee (NJATC), the National Electrical Contractors Association, the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Pellissippi State Community College, and Middle Tennessee State University to establish this program nationwide. Typically, students transfer to MTSU to complete 33 hours of distance learning and receive advanced credit to finish their degrees. It is possible for a student who is or is not seeking a journeyman's license to start taking courses at MTSU or online their freshman year. If a student wants to become an electrical journeyman, an interview with MTSU's construction advisor for Electrical Construction Management program and NJATC educational director can be arranged. Availability of space will be deciding factors as to when a student can start training. A four-year degree in this concentration will provide a strong background in technical and management skills to help graduates obtain middle management positions in the electrical construction management field.

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Construction Management, Electrical Construction Management, B.S., Academic Map  

Degree Requirements

General Education (41 hours)

General Education requirements (shown in curricular listings below) include courses in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences.

The following General Education courses are required for this major:

  • MATH 1720 (Math)
  • PHYS 1110 or PHYS 2010/2011 (Nat Sci)
  • CHEM or GEOL recommended (Nat Sci)

Major Requirements (48 hours)

  • CMT 1100 - Introduction to Construction Systems

    3 credit hours

    Introduces the major systems encountered when managing construction. Includes those operations of the residential and commercial construction industry, their similarities and how they differ in scope and daily practice. Basic entry-level plan reading skills, specifications, estimating and scheduling concepts incorporated as part of the business management functions pertaining to the construction industry. Seminar style to include student research, guest lecturers, and potential site visits. Required for graduation in Construction Management and should be taken prior to beginning CM upper-division coursework.

  • CMT 3155 - Land Development and Residential Building

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior status or permission of department. Online course for land development and infrastructure layout. House plans, methods, and techniques used in building conventional structure. Recommended for those desiring general knowledge as a consumer of residential construction. (Required for Electrical Construction Management concentration. Land Development/Residential Building Construction Management major or minor students cannot use this course to replace CMT 3150.)

  • CMT 3160 - Cost Estimating I  3 credit hours  

    CMT 3160 - Cost Estimating I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CMT 1100 or CMT 3150. Principles and practices involved in the preparation of a cost estimate for a residential home. Topics include introduction to cost estimating, materials, and labor costs for residential building.

  • CMT 3210 - Residential Codes, Regulations, Specifications, and Plan Reading

    3 credit hours

    The residential and subdivision infrastructure construction language for plan reading, codes, regulations, and specifications. Lectures and hands-on activities. Industry will provide guest lecturers and show examples of some of their work in the field. Students will be required to visit architects, city and county codes department representatives, and contractors during the semester.

  • CMT 4010 - Construction Law  3 credit hours  

    CMT 4010 - Construction Law

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing. Practical approach to the legal system in construction. Topics include licensing requirements, business associations, hiring professionals, employment issues, insurance, worker's comp, tort liability, contracts, financing, sale of property, title issues, liens, land use, bankruptcy, and warranties.

  • CMT 4120 - Scheduling  3 credit hours  

    CMT 4120 - Scheduling

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CMT 3000 or CMT 3180. Flow of labor and material toward specified goal, weather, trade characteristics, and material availability in work scheduling shown by graphs.

  • CMT 4130 - Construction Administration

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Senior standing, CMT 3160, CMT 3190, and CMT 3320. Management and administration of construction to include contracts, office, and field work.

  • CMT 4172 - Capstone for Electrical Construction Management

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Senior status; permission of department. Taken during the last semester of coursework at MTSU. Student will develop a project(s) that relates to the material covered in concentration courses. Proposed outline(s) required and must be approved by the Electrical Construction Management advisor before starting.

  • ENGR 3920 - Engineering Safety

    3 credit hours

    Safety and health in the manufacturing, construction, and utilities industries, including pertinent laws, codes, regulations, standards, and product liability considerations. Organizational and administrative principles and practices for safety management and safety engineering, accident investigation, safety education, and safety enforcement.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4420 - Industrial Safety.

  • ET 2310 - Computer-Assisted Drafting and Design I

    3 credit hours

    Covers basic technical drawing/sketching and drafting concepts using personal computers, plotters, and appropriate CAD software. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.  

  • ET 3610 - Introduction to Electricity and Electronics

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 or MATH 1730. Orientation to direct current, alternating current, magnetism, filters, and semiconductor devices. Rectifier-filters and basic transistor amplifiers are also examined as representative electronic circuits. Use of meters, oscilloscopes, and other test instruments are stressed in the laboratory. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3620 - Digital Circuits Fundamentals

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3601 or permission of instructor. Provides thorough coverage of basic digital electronic circuits analysis and design. TTL and CMOS families examined. Number systems, mapping, and minimization techniques covered. Digital design using random logic and programmable logic devices (FPGAs and CPLDs). Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3630 - Electronics  3 credit hours  

    ET 3630 - Electronics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. Introduction to analog electronics. Defines basic parameters and theory of operation of discrete semiconductor devices. Introduces fundamentals of electronic circuits analysis and design. Applications illustrate use and laboratory projects provide hands-on experience. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4600 - Programmable Logic Controllers

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. Introduction to programmable logic controllers (PLCs). Selection, operation, and troubleshooting. Ladder diagrams and programming of PLC emphasized. One hour lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4610 - Instrumentation and Controls

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ET 3620 and ET 3630. Devices and techniques used in the measurement of physical parameters. Consideration of accuracies and sources of error, identification of typical measurements, sensors and transducers, control stability and response. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4640 - Industrial Electricity

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. AC power theory and circuits for industrial applications, polyphase systems, power factor correction, and transformers. Theory, applications, and selection of motors and generators. Industrial motor control and power transmission. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

Supporting Courses (24 hours)

  • ACTG 3000 - Survey of Accounting for General Business

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: A college-level math course; ENGL 1010; sophomore standing. Accounting cycle given minor emphasis; financial statement analysis and managerial uses of accounting given major emphasis. May be used for general business minors or M.B.A. candidates who have had no previous accounting courses. (Not open to Accounting majors and students with credit in ACTG 2110 and ACTG 2120.)

  • ET 3920 - Industrial Internship I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Student is employed by an acceptable industry for industrial experience. Credit given for actual work with employer. Arrangement for this course must be made in advance. Pass/Fail.

  • ET 3930 - Industrial Internship II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3920. A continuation of Internship I. Same stipulations apply. Pass/Fail.

 

  • ENGR 3915 - Technical Project Management and Soft Skills

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Project management as sanctioned by the International Project Management Institute and how to assess and boost emotional intelligence or soft skills. Student successfully completing course will earn 20 Professional Development Units (PDUs) issued by the International Project Management Institute.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4915.

  • ENGR 3970 - Engineering Economy

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Development of capital budgets. Justification of capital projects using time value of money concepts. Replacement analysis. Review of justification of actual capital projects and computer applications. Introduces economic risk assessment and Lean Six Sigma from an economic viewpoint.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4970.

 

  • MATH 1530 - Applied Statistics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra and a Math Enhanced ACT 19 or greater or equivalent. Descriptive statistics, probability, and statistical inference. The inference unit covers means, proportions, and variances for one and two samples, and topics from one-way ANOVA, regression and correlation analysis, chi-square analysis, and nonparametrics.

  • MATH 1710 - College Algebra  3 credit hours  

    MATH 1710 - College Algebra

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: DSPM 0850 or two years of high school algebra; a Math Enhanced ACT 19 or greater or COMPASS placement. Course satisfies the General Education Mathematics requirement. Topics include functions--linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic; analysis of graphs; linear systems; inequalities; counting principles; and probability. Graphing calculator required. Course may be taken by correspondence. Not open to those who have had MATH 1730.

 

  • SPAN 1010 - Elementary Spanish I  3 credit hours  OR 

    SPAN 1010 - Elementary Spanish I

    3 credit hours

    A foundation course in reading, writing, speaking Spanish with an emphasis on conversation.

  • SPAN 1015 - Spanish for Concrete and Construction Management

    3 credit hours

    Introduces basic Spanish vocabulary and grammar with specific emphasis on facilitating communication, improving productivity, and promoting safety in the concrete and construction work environment. Cannot be used as prerequisite for SPAN 1020. Open only to majors and minors in Concrete Industry Management and Construction Management Technology.

Electives (7 hours)

Total hours in program: 120

 

Curriculum: Construction Management, Electrical Construction Management

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories.

Students should consult their advisors each semester to plan their schedules.

Freshman

 

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm) 

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • MATH 1710 - College Algebra  3 credit hours  

    MATH 1710 - College Algebra

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: DSPM 0850 or two years of high school algebra; a Math Enhanced ACT 19 or greater or COMPASS placement. Course satisfies the General Education Mathematics requirement. Topics include functions--linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic; analysis of graphs; linear systems; inequalities; counting principles; and probability. Graphing calculator required. Course may be taken by correspondence. Not open to those who have had MATH 1730.

  • MATH 1720 - Plane Trigonometry  3 credit hours  (Math) 

    MATH 1720 - Plane Trigonometry

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Strong background in algebra recommended. Trigonometric functions of the acute and general angle, circular functions, graphs of trigonometric and inverse functions, identities, solutions of right and general triangles, equations, complex numbers, and vectors. Not open to those who have had MATH 1730. Graphing calculator required.

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication  3 credit hours  (Comm) 

    COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours
  • CMT 1100 - Introduction to Construction Systems

    3 credit hours

    Introduces the major systems encountered when managing construction. Includes those operations of the residential and commercial construction industry, their similarities and how they differ in scope and daily practice. Basic entry-level plan reading skills, specifications, estimating and scheduling concepts incorporated as part of the business management functions pertaining to the construction industry. Seminar style to include student research, guest lecturers, and potential site visits. Required for graduation in Construction Management and should be taken prior to beginning CM upper-division coursework.

  • ET 2310 - Computer-Assisted Drafting and Design I

    3 credit hours

    Covers basic technical drawing/sketching and drafting concepts using personal computers, plotters, and appropriate CAD software. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.  

 

  • PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I  0 credit hours  (Nat Sci) AND 

    PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730 or MATH 1910. Required corequisite: PHYS 2011. Web-based discussion class to be taken in conjunction with cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2011. Classical mechanics traditionally covered in a first-semester college physics course. Kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Class time used for discussion of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci) 

    PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730 or MATH 1910. Required corequisite: PHYS 2010. Group-oriented problems course taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2010. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2010 discussion class. Covers kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

OR

  • PHYS 1110 - Discovering Physics  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci) 

    PHYS 1110 - Discovering Physics

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710, MATH 1730, or MATH 1630. Uncovers the fundamental concepts of physics in a hands-on approach that involves observations, measurements, forming hypotheses, and validation of ideas in groups of students' peers. Combined lecture/laboratory sessions.

Subtotal: 31 Hours

 

Sophomore

 

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR 

    ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR 

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) 

    HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

 

  • CMT 3210 - Residential Codes, Regulations, Specifications, and Plan Reading

    3 credit hours

    The residential and subdivision infrastructure construction language for plan reading, codes, regulations, and specifications. Lectures and hands-on activities. Industry will provide guest lecturers and show examples of some of their work in the field. Students will be required to visit architects, city and county codes department representatives, and contractors during the semester.

  • ET 3610 - Introduction to Electricity and Electronics

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 or MATH 1730. Orientation to direct current, alternating current, magnetism, filters, and semiconductor devices. Rectifier-filters and basic transistor amplifiers are also examined as representative electronic circuits. Use of meters, oscilloscopes, and other test instruments are stressed in the laboratory. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3620 - Digital Circuits Fundamentals

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3601 or permission of instructor. Provides thorough coverage of basic digital electronic circuits analysis and design. TTL and CMOS families examined. Number systems, mapping, and minimization techniques covered. Digital design using random logic and programmable logic devices (FPGAs and CPLDs). Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours
  • Social/Behavioral Sciences (ECON 2410 recommended) 3 credit hours
  • Electives 6 credit hours
  • Natural Science 4 credit hours (CHEM or GEOL recommended)

 

  • SPAN 1010 - Elementary Spanish I  3 credit hours  OR 

    SPAN 1010 - Elementary Spanish I

    3 credit hours

    A foundation course in reading, writing, speaking Spanish with an emphasis on conversation.

  • SPAN 1015 - Spanish for Concrete and Construction Management

    3 credit hours

    Introduces basic Spanish vocabulary and grammar with specific emphasis on facilitating communication, improving productivity, and promoting safety in the concrete and construction work environment. Cannot be used as prerequisite for SPAN 1020. Open only to majors and minors in Concrete Industry Management and Construction Management Technology.

Subtotal: 32 Hours

 

Junior

 

  • CMT 3155 - Land Development and Residential Building

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior status or permission of department. Online course for land development and infrastructure layout. House plans, methods, and techniques used in building conventional structure. Recommended for those desiring general knowledge as a consumer of residential construction. (Required for Electrical Construction Management concentration. Land Development/Residential Building Construction Management major or minor students cannot use this course to replace CMT 3150.)

  • CMT 3160 - Cost Estimating I  3 credit hours  

    CMT 3160 - Cost Estimating I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CMT 1100 or CMT 3150. Principles and practices involved in the preparation of a cost estimate for a residential home. Topics include introduction to cost estimating, materials, and labor costs for residential building.

  • CMT 4010 - Construction Law  3 credit hours  

    CMT 4010 - Construction Law

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing. Practical approach to the legal system in construction. Topics include licensing requirements, business associations, hiring professionals, employment issues, insurance, worker's comp, tort liability, contracts, financing, sale of property, title issues, liens, land use, bankruptcy, and warranties.

  • ET 3630 - Electronics  3 credit hours  

    ET 3630 - Electronics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. Introduction to analog electronics. Defines basic parameters and theory of operation of discrete semiconductor devices. Introduces fundamentals of electronic circuits analysis and design. Applications illustrate use and laboratory projects provide hands-on experience. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ENGR 3920 - Engineering Safety

    3 credit hours

    Safety and health in the manufacturing, construction, and utilities industries, including pertinent laws, codes, regulations, standards, and product liability considerations. Organizational and administrative principles and practices for safety management and safety engineering, accident investigation, safety education, and safety enforcement.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4420 - Industrial Safety.

  • ACTG 3000 - Survey of Accounting for General Business

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: A college-level math course; ENGL 1010; sophomore standing. Accounting cycle given minor emphasis; financial statement analysis and managerial uses of accounting given major emphasis. May be used for general business minors or M.B.A. candidates who have had no previous accounting courses. (Not open to Accounting majors and students with credit in ACTG 2110 and ACTG 2120.)

  • ET 3920 - Industrial Internship I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Student is employed by an acceptable industry for industrial experience. Credit given for actual work with employer. Arrangement for this course must be made in advance. Pass/Fail.

  • CMT 4130 - Construction Administration

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Senior standing, CMT 3160, CMT 3190, and CMT 3320. Management and administration of construction to include contracts, office, and field work.

  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours

 

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 30 Hours

Senior

 

  • CMT 4120 - Scheduling  3 credit hours  

    CMT 4120 - Scheduling

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CMT 3000 or CMT 3180. Flow of labor and material toward specified goal, weather, trade characteristics, and material availability in work scheduling shown by graphs.

  • CMT 4172 - Capstone for Electrical Construction Management

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Senior status; permission of department. Taken during the last semester of coursework at MTSU. Student will develop a project(s) that relates to the material covered in concentration courses. Proposed outline(s) required and must be approved by the Electrical Construction Management advisor before starting.

  • ET 3930 - Industrial Internship II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3920. A continuation of Internship I. Same stipulations apply. Pass/Fail.

  • ET 4600 - Programmable Logic Controllers

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. Introduction to programmable logic controllers (PLCs). Selection, operation, and troubleshooting. Ladder diagrams and programming of PLC emphasized. One hour lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4610 - Instrumentation and Controls

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ET 3620 and ET 3630. Devices and techniques used in the measurement of physical parameters. Consideration of accuracies and sources of error, identification of typical measurements, sensors and transducers, control stability and response. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4640 - Industrial Electricity

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. AC power theory and circuits for industrial applications, polyphase systems, power factor correction, and transformers. Theory, applications, and selection of motors and generators. Industrial motor control and power transmission. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • MATH 1530 - Applied Statistics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra and a Math Enhanced ACT 19 or greater or equivalent. Descriptive statistics, probability, and statistical inference. The inference unit covers means, proportions, and variances for one and two samples, and topics from one-way ANOVA, regression and correlation analysis, chi-square analysis, and nonparametrics.

  • Elective 1 credit hour

 

  • ENGR 3915 - Technical Project Management and Soft Skills

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Project management as sanctioned by the International Project Management Institute and how to assess and boost emotional intelligence or soft skills. Student successfully completing course will earn 20 Professional Development Units (PDUs) issued by the International Project Management Institute.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4915.

  • ENGR 3970 - Engineering Economy

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Development of capital budgets. Justification of capital projects using time value of money concepts. Replacement analysis. Review of justification of actual capital projects and computer applications. Introduces economic risk assessment and Lean Six Sigma from an economic viewpoint.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4970.

 

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 27 Hours