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Physics

Physics is a lot like chocolate—it goes with everything. That may be one reason so many of MTSU's physics majors started out in pursuit of a different degree (in recording industry, pre-medicine, music, etc.) only to discover that it was the physics of it all that fascinated them. Physics may take them on a different road back to their original interest—a career as a medical physicist, for example.

The healing power of physics

Originally a Biology major, Lauren Rigsby planned to go to medical school until a math professor pointed out she might be bored by the memorization and lack of applied problem-solving. Now, she's set her sights on career as a medical physicist. (Among other things, medical physicists help create treatment plans that ensure patients receive the right radiation dose in the correct area.)

Eureka!

After teaching the phases of the moon and planets to a second grade class during an outreach program, physics major Hillary Ball decided to choose teaching over graduate school. “I loved the eureka moments,” she says, “the looks on their faces when the light went on.” She is fascinated with the wonders of physics and the beauty of what it reveals and found support for her desire to teach through the College of Education.

There's almost no field of endeavor that doesn't have some part of it touched by physics. Not surprisingly, a B.S. in Physics can be that first step to any number of diverse careers! Examples include 

  • Acoustics researcher
  • Architect
  • Astrophysicist
  • Doctor
  • Engineer
  • High school physics teacher
  • Medical physicist
  • Naval mine warfare analyst
  • Patent attorney
  • Pilot
  • Software developer
  • Spacecraft designer
  • Radio Frequency (RF) specialist
  • Video game developer

Employers of MTSU alumni include

  • AFL Global
  • Arlington High School
  • Cheezburger Network
  • Corvel Corporation
  • Energetics Technology
  • Fort Sanders Regional Medical Center
  • Gearbox Software
  • JET Programme, Japan
  • Robert Half Technology
  • RF Signatures
  • Memorial Hospital, Chattanooga
  • Middle Tennessee Medical Center
  • MiraCosta College
  • Tennessee Valley Authority
  • Texas Tech University
  • University of Maryland

Students in the Physics program can pursue a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Physics or the same degree with a concentration in Physics Teaching, Professional Physics, or Astronomy. Within the Professional Physics concentration are tracks in medical physics and astrophysics.

Undergraduate students can pursue a minor in Physics, Electro-Acoustics, or Astronomy.

A minor in Physics is available for graduate students, as well.

Professional Physics Physics Teaching Applied Physics 


Physics, Professional Physics Concentration, B.S.

Department of Physics and Astronomy 
615-898-2130
Ron Henderson, program coordinator
Ron.Henderson@mtsu.edu

All physics majors must choose to concentrate in Professional Physics, Physics Teaching, Applied Physics, or Astronomy. Each concentration specifies additional upper-division electives in physics and astronomy and other disciplines which vary by concentration. A minimum of 12 upper-division semester hours in the physics major must be taken at MTSU.

The physics core consists of 25 semester hours of physics and astronomy. Other requirements include 8 semester hours of chemistry and 8 semester hours of mathematics.

The Professional Physics concentration offers preparation for graduate work in physics, medical physics, astrophysics, or engineering. In addition to the physics common requirements, the following courses are required:

Required Courses

 

  • PHYS 3150 - Topics and Methods of Theoretical Physics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2120 and MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Theoretical techniques used for problem solving in physics. Reference frames and coordinate systems, approximation techniques, solution of electrical circuits and mechanical systems, simple harmonic motion and wave motion, Maxwell's equations.

  • PHYS 3200 - Scientific Modeling and Problem Solving

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisites: One year of physics and MATH 1920 or consent of instructor. Techniques of computational physics as applied to the solution of scientific problems.

  • PHYS 3300 - Classical Mechanics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3150 (or PHYS 2120 and MATH 3120). Mechanics (including statics and dynamics) of particles in three dimensions using vector analysis, motion of rigid bodies, Lagrangian mechanics, and Hamilton's equations.

  • PHYS 4310 - Electricity and Magnetism

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3160. Topics including electric and magnetic fields, electrostatic potential, and potential energy and fields in matter, discussed in a mathematically rigorous manner. A variety of good applications of mathematical methods in physics.

  • PHYS 4330 - Electricity and Magnetism II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 4310. Topics include theory of electromagnetic radiation, production and propagation of electromagnetic waves, and the solution of boundary-value problems with applications to optics, wave guides, and lasers.

  • PHYS 4380 - Quantum Mechanics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 3110 and PHYS 3160. Topics include both one- and three-dimensional solutions to the Schroedinger equation, including the infinite square-well, finite square-well, tunneling, the harmonic oscillator, and the hydrogen atom with a discussion of angular momentum at a mathematically rigorous undergraduate level.

Supporting Courses (16 hours)

 

  • CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I  4 credit hours  AND

    CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: High school chemistry. Corequisite: CHEM 1111. Fundamental concepts of atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometric relationships, periodic properties of the elements, thermochemistry, and properties of gases. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II  4 credit hours  AND

    CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Corequisite: CHEM 1121. Chemical equilibrium, solid and liquid states of matter, chemistry of acids and bases, principles of chemical kinetics, precipitation reactions, elementary thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1920 - Calculus II  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1920 - Calculus II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. A topics course providing a wide view of different techniques and applications of calculus in the plane. Techniques of integration and applications of integration fully developed. Power series and Taylor series included. Emphasis on multidisciplinary applications includes Taylor series approximation; applications of integration to physics, biology, and business; and geometric and power series applications. Graphing calculator required.

Physics Common Requirements

The common requirements for all Physics majors consist of

Physics Core (25 hours)

 

  • PHYS 1010 - Physics Colloquium  1 credit hour credit hours  

    PHYS 1010 - Physics Colloquium

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Introduces new physics and astronomy students to the physics major. Topics include degree requirements, faculty resources, research opportunities, and career options. Half of the meetings will involve one hour lectures during class, and half will involve attending talks, some of which may occur outside the scheduled class meeting time.

  • PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2011. Web-based discussion class to be taken in conjunction with cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2011. Classical mechanics traditionally covered in a first-semester college physics course. Kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Class time used for discussion of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2010. Group-oriented problems course taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2010. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2010 discussion class. Covers kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

OR

  • PHYS 2110 - Calculus-Based Physics I

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Corequisite: PHYS 2111. A calculus-based introduction to mechanics and wave motion. One and one-half hours lecture.

  • PHYS 2111 - Calculus-Based Physics Laboratory I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Corequisite: PHYS 2110. Laboratory course to accompany PHYS 2110. Experiments in mechanics, waves, and thermodynamics. Data reduction, error analysis, and report writing. Two three-hour sessions.

 

  • PHYS 2020 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics II

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2021. Web-based discussion class taken in conjunction with the cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2021. Fundamentals of optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. Scheduled class time is used for discussions of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2021 - Physics Problems Laboratory II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2020. Group-oriented problems course to be taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2020. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2020 discussion class. Optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. The skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

OR

  • PHYS 2120 - Calculus-Based Physics II

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2111; MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Required corequisite: PHYS 2121. A lecture course that supplements the discussion in PHYS 2121. Topics include a microscopic view of electrical force and field, polarization, electric circuits, magnetic force and field, electric potential, symmetries of fields, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic radiation, optics, and wave phenomena. One and one-half hours lecture.

  • PHYS 2121 - Calculus-Based Physics Laboratory II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2111; MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Required corequisite: PHYS 2120. A laboratory-based course to accompany PHYS 2120. Includes discussions, group problem solving, and hands-on activities. Two three-hour sessions.

 

  • PHYS 3100 - Modern Physics I  3 credit hours  

    PHYS 3100 - Modern Physics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2120 and MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Introduction to the fundamental principles of modern physics (special relativity and quantum mechanics) and their application to atomic physics.

  • PHYS 3110 - Modern Physics II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3100. Survey of major topics including molecular physics, statistical physics, solid state physics and solid state devices, nuclear models, nuclear decay and reaction, and elementary particle physics.

  • PHYS 3111 - Modern Physics Laboratory  1 credit hour credit hours  

    PHYS 3111 - Modern Physics Laboratory

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite or corequisite:  PHYS 3110. Concepts and ideas which formed the basis for an understanding of the atom and atomic phenomena. One hour lecture and one three-hour independent study laboratory.

  • PHYS 3610 - Thermodynamics  3 credit hours  

    PHYS 3610 - Thermodynamics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3110 and PHYS 3150 or consent of instructor. Introduction to statistical physics, kinetic theory, and thermodynamics from a unified microscopic point of view. Selected applications to various systems of interest presented.

  • PHYS 3800 - Physics Seminar  1 credit hour credit hours  

    PHYS 3800 - Physics Seminar

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite:  PHYS 3100. Develops and refines inquiry, communication, and presentation skills through exposure to new developments in physics, technical brief writing, and resume and job interview preparations.

  • PHYS 3900 - Physics Practicum  1 credit hour credit hours  

    PHYS 3900 - Physics Practicum

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite:  PHYS 3100 and consent of instructor. Refines thinking, communication, and interpersonal skills through exposure to on-the-spot technical questions and a laboratory teaching experience as an assistant in an introductory physics laboratory.  One hour lecture and two two-and-one-half  hour experiences as a teaching assistant to be scheduled with department faculty.

 

  • PHYS 4850 - Physics Research  2 credit hours  OR

    PHYS 4850 - Physics Research

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Independent study of a selected research problem in physics. Includes experimental and/or theoretical investigation of an important, yet unexplored, problem. Includes literature research, experiment design/problem formulation and execution, resulting in oral and written presentation of results suitable for submission for publication in a suitable journal. One hour lecture and significant time working with research mentor.

  • ASTR 4850 - Astronomy Research

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Independent study of a selected research problem in astronomy. Includes experimental and/or theoretical investigation of an important yet unexplored problem or experimental design. Includes literature research and experimental design/problem formulation and execution resulting in oral and written presentation of results suitable for submission/presentation to a suitable journal/conference. One hour lecture and significant additional time working with research mentor.

 

  • PHYS 4900 - Physics Senior Thesis

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 4850 or PHYS 4860 and consent of department chair. Brings undergraduate experience to focus on a specific research problem; chosen with the consent of the thesis committee and with the potential for original discovery or for creative development of a tool or technique applicable to scientific research. Independent pursuit of research objectives outlined in a research proposal results in a written thesis whose approval will include an oral defense. One hour lecture and independent writing of thesis.

  • ASTR 4900 - Astronomy Senior Thesis

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ASTR 4850 and consent of department chair. Focuses on a specific research/experimental design problem chosen with the consent of the thesis committee and with the potential for original discovery or for creative development of a tool, technique, or instrumentation applicable to scientific research. Independent pursuit of research objectives outlined in a research proposal results in a written thesis, the approval of which will include an oral defense. One hour lecture and independent writing of thesis.

Professional Physics: Medical Physics Track

The medical physics track offers preparation for graduate work in medical physics and radiation oncology physics, eventually leading to a career as a medical physicist in a clinical or academic setting. In addition to the physics common requirements and the Professional Physics concentration requirements, the following courses are recommended:

  • PHYS 3600 - Radiation Oncology Physics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: MATH 1910 and a one-year introductory sequence in physics. Introduction to  field of radiation oncology physics, including a discussion of fundamental physics and techniques associated with the diagnosis and treatment of cancer using electromagnetic radiation and particle beams. Includes experiences in a radiation oncology clinic and interactions with practicing medical physicists.

  • PHYS 3601 - Medical Physics Practicum  1 credit hour credit hours  

    PHYS 3601 - Medical Physics Practicum

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite or corequisite: PHYS 3600. Real-world/clinical applications of concepts and theory from PHYS 3600, especially those associated with detectors and dosimetry. May include hands-on activities at the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center.

  • PHYS 4600 - Topics in Medical Physics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 3110 and PHYS 3160. Topics in medical physics at an advanced undergraduate level. Possible topics include charged-particle interactions and equilibrium in matter, cavity theory, dosimetry, CTs, and MRIs.

 

  • BIOL 2010 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I

    4 credit hours

    Completion of  BIOL 1030 and  BIOL 1031 or a grade of C or better in high school chemistry and biology within the last five years is strongly recommended. Corequisite:  BIOL 2011 . Meets requirements for many pre-health professional programs including nursing. Structure and function of the cell, integumentary, skeletal, muscle, and nervous systems. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.  

 

  • BIOL 2020 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: C or better in BIOL 2010/BIOL 2011. Corequisite: BIOL 2021. Meets requirements for many pre-health professional programs including nursing. Structure and function of endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, urinary, digestive, and reproductive systems. Biology majors passing both BIOL 2010/BIOL 2111 and BIOL 2020/BIOL 2021 with a C or better may substitute both courses for BIOL 3020. However, the substitution is not recommended for pre-med students and does not count for upper-division hours. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

Professional Physics: Astrophysics Track

The astrophysics track offers preparation for graduate work in astronomy or astrophysics. In addition to the physics common requirements and the Professional Physics concentration requirements, the following courses are recommended:

  • ASTR 1031 - Observing the Universe  1 credit hour credit hours  

    ASTR 1031 - Observing the Universe

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite or corequisite: ASTR 1030. Introduction to observational astronomy through laboratory exercises and outdoor observing activities. Topics include telescopes, the analysis of starlight, and observations of stars and planets.

  • ASTR 2030 - Solar System Astronomy

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710. Comprehensive study of the solar system including models of solar and planetary formation. Analysis of the chemical makeup and physical nature of the Sun, planets, moons, and comets using mathematics and the scientific method. Focus on planetary interiors, surfaces, atmospheres, solar-planetary interactions, and solar system evolution. Discussion of spacecraft missions, future solar system exploration, and possibilities of extraterrestrial life.

  • ASTR 2040 - Stars, Galaxies, and Cosmology

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710. A comprehensive study of stellar, galactic, and cosmological astronomy. Analyzes the basic theories of stellar and galactic formation and evolution using mathematics and the scientific method. Includes the cataclysmic topics of supernovae, neutron stars, pulsars, and black holes as well as the nature of galaxies including the Milky Way galaxy, active galaxies and quasars, and the formation and evolution of our universe, the big bang theory, and the possibility of other life in the universe.

  • ASTR 3400 - Fundamentals of Astrophysics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2120 and MATH 1910. Modern astronomical knowledge and techniques using classical and modern physical principles. Possible topics include star formation, black holes and neutron stars, galaxy structure and evolution, formation of planetary systems, and large-scale structure of the universe.

  • ASTR 3401 - Experimental Astronomy  1 credit hour credit hours  

    ASTR 3401 - Experimental Astronomy

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2120 or consent of instructor. Principles and techniques of astronomical data acquisition and reduction. Possible research topics involve photometry, spectroscopy, astronomical applications of electronic detectors, and computer modeling.

Curriculum: Physics, Professional Physics

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories.

Consult with a physics advisor for courses to take during the junior and senior years.

Freshman

 

  • PHYS 1010 - Physics Colloquium  1 credit hour credit hours  

    PHYS 1010 - Physics Colloquium

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Introduces new physics and astronomy students to the physics major. Topics include degree requirements, faculty resources, research opportunities, and career options. Half of the meetings will involve one hour lectures during class, and half will involve attending talks, some of which may occur outside the scheduled class meeting time.

  • PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I  0 credit hours  (Nat Sci)

    PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2011. Web-based discussion class to be taken in conjunction with cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2011. Classical mechanics traditionally covered in a first-semester college physics course. Kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Class time used for discussion of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci)

    PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2010. Group-oriented problems course taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2010. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2010 discussion class. Covers kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

OR

  • PHYS 2110 - Calculus-Based Physics I  0 credit hours  (Nat Sci)

    PHYS 2110 - Calculus-Based Physics I

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Corequisite: PHYS 2111. A calculus-based introduction to mechanics and wave motion. One and one-half hours lecture.

  • PHYS 2111 - Calculus-Based Physics Laboratory I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Corequisite: PHYS 2110. Laboratory course to accompany PHYS 2110. Experiments in mechanics, waves, and thermodynamics. Data reduction, error analysis, and report writing. Two three-hour sessions.

  • PHYS 2020 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics II

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2021. Web-based discussion class taken in conjunction with the cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2021. Fundamentals of optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. Scheduled class time is used for discussions of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2021 - Physics Problems Laboratory II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2020. Group-oriented problems course to be taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2020. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2020 discussion class. Optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. The skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

OR

  • PHYS 2120 - Calculus-Based Physics II

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2111; MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Required corequisite: PHYS 2121. A lecture course that supplements the discussion in PHYS 2121. Topics include a microscopic view of electrical force and field, polarization, electric circuits, magnetic force and field, electric potential, symmetries of fields, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic radiation, optics, and wave phenomena. One and one-half hours lecture.

  • PHYS 2121 - Calculus-Based Physics Laboratory II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2111; MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Required corequisite: PHYS 2120. A laboratory-based course to accompany PHYS 2120. Includes discussions, group problem solving, and hands-on activities. Two three-hour sessions.

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  (Math)

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1920 - Calculus II  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1920 - Calculus II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. A topics course providing a wide view of different techniques and applications of calculus in the plane. Techniques of integration and applications of integration fully developed. Power series and Taylor series included. Emphasis on multidisciplinary applications includes Taylor series approximation; applications of integration to physics, biology, and business; and geometric and power series applications. Graphing calculator required.

  • CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci)

    CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: High school chemistry. Corequisite: CHEM 1111. Fundamental concepts of atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometric relationships, periodic properties of the elements, thermochemistry, and properties of gases. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II  4 credit hours  AND

    CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Corequisite: CHEM 1121. Chemical equilibrium, solid and liquid states of matter, chemistry of acids and bases, principles of chemical kinetics, precipitation reactions, elementary thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

Subtotal: 31 Hours

 

Sophomore

 

  • PHYS 3100 - Modern Physics I  3 credit hours  

    PHYS 3100 - Modern Physics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2120 and MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Introduction to the fundamental principles of modern physics (special relativity and quantum mechanics) and their application to atomic physics.

  • PHYS 3110 - Modern Physics II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3100. Survey of major topics including molecular physics, statistical physics, solid state physics and solid state devices, nuclear models, nuclear decay and reaction, and elementary particle physics.

  • PHYS 3111 - Modern Physics Laboratory  1 credit hour credit hours  

    PHYS 3111 - Modern Physics Laboratory

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite or corequisite:  PHYS 3110. Concepts and ideas which formed the basis for an understanding of the atom and atomic phenomena. One hour lecture and one three-hour independent study laboratory.

  • PHYS 3150 - Topics and Methods of Theoretical Physics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2120 and MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Theoretical techniques used for problem solving in physics. Reference frames and coordinate systems, approximation techniques, solution of electrical circuits and mechanical systems, simple harmonic motion and wave motion, Maxwell's equations.

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

  • Mathematics 7 credit hours

 

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

Subtotal: 26 Hours

 

Junior

 

  • PHYS 3200 - Scientific Modeling and Problem Solving

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisites: One year of physics and MATH 1920 or consent of instructor. Techniques of computational physics as applied to the solution of scientific problems.

  • PHYS 3610 - Thermodynamics  3 credit hours  *

    PHYS 3610 - Thermodynamics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3110 and PHYS 3150 or consent of instructor. Introduction to statistical physics, kinetic theory, and thermodynamics from a unified microscopic point of view. Selected applications to various systems of interest presented.

  • PHYS 3900 - Physics Practicum  1 credit hour credit hours  

    PHYS 3900 - Physics Practicum

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite:  PHYS 3100 and consent of instructor. Refines thinking, communication, and interpersonal skills through exposure to on-the-spot technical questions and a laboratory teaching experience as an assistant in an introductory physics laboratory.  One hour lecture and two two-and-one-half  hour experiences as a teaching assistant to be scheduled with department faculty.

  • PHYS 4380 - Quantum Mechanics  3 credit hours  *

    PHYS 4380 - Quantum Mechanics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 3110 and PHYS 3160. Topics include both one- and three-dimensional solutions to the Schroedinger equation, including the infinite square-well, finite square-well, tunneling, the harmonic oscillator, and the hydrogen atom with a discussion of angular momentum at a mathematically rigorous undergraduate level.

  • Electives 9-12 credit hours
  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts (2 rubrics) 6 credit hours
  • Social/Behavioral Sciences (2 rubrics) 6 credit hours

Subtotal: 30-33 Hours

 

Senior

 

  • Electives 12-15 credit hours
  • PHYS 3300 - Classical Mechanics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3150 (or PHYS 2120 and MATH 3120). Mechanics (including statics and dynamics) of particles in three dimensions using vector analysis, motion of rigid bodies, Lagrangian mechanics, and Hamilton's equations.

  • PHYS 3800 - Physics Seminar  1 credit hour credit hours  

    PHYS 3800 - Physics Seminar

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite:  PHYS 3100. Develops and refines inquiry, communication, and presentation skills through exposure to new developments in physics, technical brief writing, and resume and job interview preparations.

  • PHYS 4310 - Electricity and Magnetism

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3160. Topics including electric and magnetic fields, electrostatic potential, and potential energy and fields in matter, discussed in a mathematically rigorous manner. A variety of good applications of mathematical methods in physics.

  • PHYS 4330 - Electricity and Magnetism II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 4310. Topics include theory of electromagnetic radiation, production and propagation of electromagnetic waves, and the solution of boundary-value problems with applications to optics, wave guides, and lasers.

  • PHYS 4850 - Physics Research  2 credit hours  

    PHYS 4850 - Physics Research

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Independent study of a selected research problem in physics. Includes experimental and/or theoretical investigation of an important, yet unexplored, problem. Includes literature research, experiment design/problem formulation and execution, resulting in oral and written presentation of results suitable for submission for publication in a suitable journal. One hour lecture and significant time working with research mentor.

  • PHYS 4900 - Physics Senior Thesis

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 4850 or PHYS 4860 and consent of department chair. Brings undergraduate experience to focus on a specific research problem; chosen with the consent of the thesis committee and with the potential for original discovery or for creative development of a tool or technique applicable to scientific research. Independent pursuit of research objectives outlined in a research proposal results in a written thesis whose approval will include an oral defense. One hour lecture and independent writing of thesis.

Choose 6 hours from:

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 32-35 Hours

 

Total hours in program: 120

 

NOTE:

*Offered every other year

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Physics, Professional Physics, B.S., Academic Map  


Physics, Physics Teaching Concentration, B.S.

Department of Physics and Astronomy 
615-898-2130
Ron Henderson, program coordinator
Ron.Henderson@mtsu.edu

All physics majors must choose to concentrate in Professional Physics, Physics Teaching, Applied Physics, or Astronomy. Each concentration specifies additional upper-division electives in physics and astronomy and other disciplines which vary by concentration. A minimum of 12 upper-division semester hours in the physics major must be taken at MTSU.

The physics core consists of 25 semester hours of physics and astronomy. Other requirements include 8 semester hours of chemistry and 8 semester hours of mathematics.

The Physics Teaching concentration offers preparation for careers as physics teachers, as well as serving as an appropriate degree path for other physics majors who do not plan to attend graduate school. In addition to the physics common requirements, the following courses are required:

Required Courses (8 hours)

 

  • PHYS 3930 - The Teaching of Physics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3950. Introduces physics teaching pedagogies resulting from physics education research. Methods studied to include inquiry, discovery, and modeling-based approaches. Seminar meeting will be supplemented with extensive experience as a learning assistant in a hands-on cooperative-learning and/or discovery-learning based introductory physics course.

  • PHYS 3950 - Physics Licensure I  1 credit hour credit hours  

    PHYS 3950 - Physics Licensure I

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2121 and MATH 1920. Overview of fundamental physics topics covered on licensure exams leading to endorsement to teach high school physics. Focuses on topics typically covered in the first semester of introductory physics. One one-hour, twenty-five minute lecture per week.  

  • PHYS 3960 - Physics Licensure II  1 credit hour credit hours  

    PHYS 3960 - Physics Licensure II

    1 credit hour credit hours

     Prerequisite: PHYS 3950. Overview of fundamental physics covered on licensure exams that lead to endorsement to teach high school physics. Subject matter will focus on topics typically covered in the second semester of introductory physics. One-hour twenty-five minutes lecture per week.                    

  • ASTR 1030 - Exploring the Universe

    3 credit hours

    A general introduction to astronomy through an overview of planets, stars, systems of stars, and the overall structure of the universe. Topics will be discussed by answering questions such as "How do you weigh stars?" and "Will the universe die?"

Supporting Courses (26 hours)

 

  • BIOL 1110 - General Biology  4 credit hours  AND

    BIOL 1110 - General Biology

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: BIOL 1111. Primarily for Biology majors and minors and other science-oriented students. Biological principles and processes, including introduction to the nature of science, cells (structure, function, metabolism, division), genetics, evolution, viruses, bacteria, protists, and fungi. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory. While BIOL 1110 can be used to fulfill half the 8-hour General Education requirement for Natural Sciences, it is the first semester of a two-semester sequence primarily designed for science majors.

 

  • CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I  4 credit hours  AND

    CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: High school chemistry. Corequisite: CHEM 1111. Fundamental concepts of atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometric relationships, periodic properties of the elements, thermochemistry, and properties of gases. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II  4 credit hours  AND

    CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Corequisite: CHEM 1121. Chemical equilibrium, solid and liquid states of matter, chemistry of acids and bases, principles of chemical kinetics, precipitation reactions, elementary thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1920 - Calculus II  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1920 - Calculus II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. A topics course providing a wide view of different techniques and applications of calculus in the plane. Techniques of integration and applications of integration fully developed. Power series and Taylor series included. Emphasis on multidisciplinary applications includes Taylor series approximation; applications of integration to physics, biology, and business; and geometric and power series applications. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 2050 - Probability and Statistics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Calculus I. Data analysis, probability, and statistical inference. The inference material covers means, proportions, and variances for one and two samples, one-way ANOVA, regression and correlation, and chi-square analysis.

 

  • MATH 3120 - Differential Equations I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. The solution and application of ordinary differential equations with emphasis on first order equations, second order linear equations, Laplace Transform method, systems of differential equations, and numerical methods.

  • PHYS 3150 - Topics and Methods of Theoretical Physics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2120 and MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Theoretical techniques used for problem solving in physics. Reference frames and coordinate systems, approximation techniques, solution of electrical circuits and mechanical systems, simple harmonic motion and wave motion, Maxwell's equations.

Note:

Contact the Physics and Astronomy department office for scholarship opportunities for Physics Teaching students.

Teacher Licensure in Physics

Students seeking a license to teach physics in secondary schools (grades 7-12) must complete (1) a major in physics with a concentration in Physics Teaching, and/or (2) a minor in Secondary Education through MTeach.

Students must contact their Secondary Education Minor advisors for approval of appropriate courses.

Physics Common Requirements

The common requirements required of ALL Physics majors consist of

Physics Core (25 hours)

  • PHYS 1010 - Physics Colloquium  1 credit hour credit hours  

    PHYS 1010 - Physics Colloquium

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Introduces new physics and astronomy students to the physics major. Topics include degree requirements, faculty resources, research opportunities, and career options. Half of the meetings will involve one hour lectures during class, and half will involve attending talks, some of which may occur outside the scheduled class meeting time.

 

  • PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2011. Web-based discussion class to be taken in conjunction with cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2011. Classical mechanics traditionally covered in a first-semester college physics course. Kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Class time used for discussion of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2010. Group-oriented problems course taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2010. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2010 discussion class. Covers kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

OR

  • PHYS 2110 - Calculus-Based Physics I

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Corequisite: PHYS 2111. A calculus-based introduction to mechanics and wave motion. One and one-half hours lecture.

  • PHYS 2111 - Calculus-Based Physics Laboratory I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Corequisite: PHYS 2110. Laboratory course to accompany PHYS 2110. Experiments in mechanics, waves, and thermodynamics. Data reduction, error analysis, and report writing. Two three-hour sessions.

 

  • PHYS 2020 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics II

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2021. Web-based discussion class taken in conjunction with the cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2021. Fundamentals of optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. Scheduled class time is used for discussions of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2021 - Physics Problems Laboratory II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2020. Group-oriented problems course to be taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2020. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2020 discussion class. Optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. The skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

OR

  • PHYS 2120 - Calculus-Based Physics II

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2111; MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Required corequisite: PHYS 2121. A lecture course that supplements the discussion in PHYS 2121. Topics include a microscopic view of electrical force and field, polarization, electric circuits, magnetic force and field, electric potential, symmetries of fields, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic radiation, optics, and wave phenomena. One and one-half hours lecture.

  • PHYS 2121 - Calculus-Based Physics Laboratory II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2111; MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Required corequisite: PHYS 2120. A laboratory-based course to accompany PHYS 2120. Includes discussions, group problem solving, and hands-on activities. Two three-hour sessions.

 

  • PHYS 3100 - Modern Physics I  3 credit hours  *

    PHYS 3100 - Modern Physics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2120 and MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Introduction to the fundamental principles of modern physics (special relativity and quantum mechanics) and their application to atomic physics.

  • PHYS 3070 - Concepts in Modern Physics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2120 and MATH 1920. Introduction to the concepts of twentieth-century physics. Discusses fundamental concepts of modern physics including relativity, atomic physics, wave optics, and quantum mechanics. Not intended to prepare students for graduate school in physics.

  • PHYS 3110 - Modern Physics II  3 credit hours  *

    PHYS 3110 - Modern Physics II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3100. Survey of major topics including molecular physics, statistical physics, solid state physics and solid state devices, nuclear models, nuclear decay and reaction, and elementary particle physics.

  • PHYS 3080 - Concepts in Modern Physics II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3070 or PHYS 3100. Introduction to the concepts of twentieth-century physics. Discusses the fundamental concepts of modern physics including molecular physics, statistical distributions, solid state physics, and nuclear particle physics. Not intended to prepare students for graduate school in physics.

 

  • PHYS 3111 - Modern Physics Laboratory  1 credit hour credit hours  

    PHYS 3111 - Modern Physics Laboratory

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite or corequisite:  PHYS 3110. Concepts and ideas which formed the basis for an understanding of the atom and atomic phenomena. One hour lecture and one three-hour independent study laboratory.

  • PHYS 3610 - Thermodynamics  3 credit hours  *

    PHYS 3610 - Thermodynamics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3110 and PHYS 3150 or consent of instructor. Introduction to statistical physics, kinetic theory, and thermodynamics from a unified microscopic point of view. Selected applications to various systems of interest presented.

  • PHYS 3510 - Concepts in Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3080 or PHYS 3110. Introduction to the concepts of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Discusses the fundamentals of thermodynamics from both the macroscopic and microscopic points of view including entropy, enthalpy, heat engines, Helmholtz and Gibbs free energy, the partition function, and quantum statistics. Not intended to prepare students for graduate school in physics.

  • PHYS 3400 - Intermediate Physics

    3 credit hours

     Prerequisite: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2121 and MATH 1920. Provides an intermediated treatment of the principles of thermodynamics, electromagnetics, and oscillatory behavior with applications. Course is not intended for physics majors participating in the Professional Physics concentration. Three hours lecture.

  • PHYS 3800 - Physics Seminar  1 credit hour credit hours  

    PHYS 3800 - Physics Seminar

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite:  PHYS 3100. Develops and refines inquiry, communication, and presentation skills through exposure to new developments in physics, technical brief writing, and resume and job interview preparations.

  • PHYS 3900 - Physics Practicum  1 credit hour credit hours  

    PHYS 3900 - Physics Practicum

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite:  PHYS 3100 and consent of instructor. Refines thinking, communication, and interpersonal skills through exposure to on-the-spot technical questions and a laboratory teaching experience as an assistant in an introductory physics laboratory.  One hour lecture and two two-and-one-half  hour experiences as a teaching assistant to be scheduled with department faculty.

 

  • PHYS 4850 - Physics Research  2 credit hours  OR

    PHYS 4850 - Physics Research

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Independent study of a selected research problem in physics. Includes experimental and/or theoretical investigation of an important, yet unexplored, problem. Includes literature research, experiment design/problem formulation and execution, resulting in oral and written presentation of results suitable for submission for publication in a suitable journal. One hour lecture and significant time working with research mentor.

  • ASTR 4850 - Astronomy Research

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Independent study of a selected research problem in astronomy. Includes experimental and/or theoretical investigation of an important yet unexplored problem or experimental design. Includes literature research and experimental design/problem formulation and execution resulting in oral and written presentation of results suitable for submission/presentation to a suitable journal/conference. One hour lecture and significant additional time working with research mentor.

 

  • PHYS 4900 - Physics Senior Thesis

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 4850 or PHYS 4860 and consent of department chair. Brings undergraduate experience to focus on a specific research problem; chosen with the consent of the thesis committee and with the potential for original discovery or for creative development of a tool or technique applicable to scientific research. Independent pursuit of research objectives outlined in a research proposal results in a written thesis whose approval will include an oral defense. One hour lecture and independent writing of thesis.

  • ASTR 4900 - Astronomy Senior Thesis

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ASTR 4850 and consent of department chair. Focuses on a specific research/experimental design problem chosen with the consent of the thesis committee and with the potential for original discovery or for creative development of a tool, technique, or instrumentation applicable to scientific research. Independent pursuit of research objectives outlined in a research proposal results in a written thesis, the approval of which will include an oral defense. One hour lecture and independent writing of thesis.

NOTE:

* Substitutions are allowed as follows: PHYS 3100 (PHYS 3070), PHYS 3110 (PHYS 3080), and PHYS 3610 (PHYS 3510 or PHYS 3400).

Curriculum: Physics, Physics Teaching

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories.

Freshman

 

  • PHYS 1010 - Physics Colloquium  1 credit hour credit hours  

    PHYS 1010 - Physics Colloquium

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Introduces new physics and astronomy students to the physics major. Topics include degree requirements, faculty resources, research opportunities, and career options. Half of the meetings will involve one hour lectures during class, and half will involve attending talks, some of which may occur outside the scheduled class meeting time.

  • PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I  0 credit hours  (Nat Sci) AND

    PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2011. Web-based discussion class to be taken in conjunction with cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2011. Classical mechanics traditionally covered in a first-semester college physics course. Kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Class time used for discussion of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci)

    PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2010. Group-oriented problems course taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2010. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2010 discussion class. Covers kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

OR

  • PHYS 2110 - Calculus-Based Physics I  0 credit hours  (Nat Sci)

    PHYS 2110 - Calculus-Based Physics I

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Corequisite: PHYS 2111. A calculus-based introduction to mechanics and wave motion. One and one-half hours lecture.

  • PHYS 2111 - Calculus-Based Physics Laboratory I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Corequisite: PHYS 2110. Laboratory course to accompany PHYS 2110. Experiments in mechanics, waves, and thermodynamics. Data reduction, error analysis, and report writing. Two three-hour sessions.

  • PHYS 2020 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics II

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2021. Web-based discussion class taken in conjunction with the cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2021. Fundamentals of optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. Scheduled class time is used for discussions of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2021 - Physics Problems Laboratory II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2020. Group-oriented problems course to be taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2020. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2020 discussion class. Optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. The skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

OR

  • PHYS 2120 - Calculus-Based Physics II

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2111; MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Required corequisite: PHYS 2121. A lecture course that supplements the discussion in PHYS 2121. Topics include a microscopic view of electrical force and field, polarization, electric circuits, magnetic force and field, electric potential, symmetries of fields, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic radiation, optics, and wave phenomena. One and one-half hours lecture.

  • PHYS 2121 - Calculus-Based Physics Laboratory II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2111; MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Required corequisite: PHYS 2120. A laboratory-based course to accompany PHYS 2120. Includes discussions, group problem solving, and hands-on activities. Two three-hour sessions.

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  (Math)

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1920 - Calculus II  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1920 - Calculus II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. A topics course providing a wide view of different techniques and applications of calculus in the plane. Techniques of integration and applications of integration fully developed. Power series and Taylor series included. Emphasis on multidisciplinary applications includes Taylor series approximation; applications of integration to physics, biology, and business; and geometric and power series applications. Graphing calculator required.

  • CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci) AND

    CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: High school chemistry. Corequisite: CHEM 1111. Fundamental concepts of atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometric relationships, periodic properties of the elements, thermochemistry, and properties of gases. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II  4 credit hours  AND

    CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Corequisite: CHEM 1121. Chemical equilibrium, solid and liquid states of matter, chemistry of acids and bases, principles of chemical kinetics, precipitation reactions, elementary thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

Subtotal: 31 Hours

 

Sophomore

 

  • PHYS 3100 - Modern Physics I  3 credit hours  OR

    PHYS 3100 - Modern Physics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2120 and MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Introduction to the fundamental principles of modern physics (special relativity and quantum mechanics) and their application to atomic physics.

  • PHYS 3070 - Concepts in Modern Physics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2120 and MATH 1920. Introduction to the concepts of twentieth-century physics. Discusses fundamental concepts of modern physics including relativity, atomic physics, wave optics, and quantum mechanics. Not intended to prepare students for graduate school in physics.

  • PHYS 3110 - Modern Physics II  3 credit hours  OR

    PHYS 3110 - Modern Physics II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3100. Survey of major topics including molecular physics, statistical physics, solid state physics and solid state devices, nuclear models, nuclear decay and reaction, and elementary particle physics.

  • PHYS 3080 - Concepts in Modern Physics II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3070 or PHYS 3100. Introduction to the concepts of twentieth-century physics. Discusses the fundamental concepts of modern physics including molecular physics, statistical distributions, solid state physics, and nuclear particle physics. Not intended to prepare students for graduate school in physics.

  • MATH 2050 - Probability and Statistics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Calculus I. Data analysis, probability, and statistical inference. The inference material covers means, proportions, and variances for one and two samples, one-way ANOVA, regression and correlation, and chi-square analysis.

  • MATH 3120 - Differential Equations I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. The solution and application of ordinary differential equations with emphasis on first order equations, second order linear equations, Laplace Transform method, systems of differential equations, and numerical methods.

  • PHYS 3150 - Topics and Methods of Theoretical Physics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2120 and MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Theoretical techniques used for problem solving in physics. Reference frames and coordinate systems, approximation techniques, solution of electrical circuits and mechanical systems, simple harmonic motion and wave motion, Maxwell's equations.

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours
  • Elective 3 credit hours
  • PHYS 3111 - Modern Physics Laboratory  1 credit hour credit hours  

    PHYS 3111 - Modern Physics Laboratory

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite or corequisite:  PHYS 3110. Concepts and ideas which formed the basis for an understanding of the atom and atomic phenomena. One hour lecture and one three-hour independent study laboratory.

  • PHYS 3900 - Physics Practicum  1 credit hour credit hours  

    PHYS 3900 - Physics Practicum

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite:  PHYS 3100 and consent of instructor. Refines thinking, communication, and interpersonal skills through exposure to on-the-spot technical questions and a laboratory teaching experience as an assistant in an introductory physics laboratory.  One hour lecture and two two-and-one-half  hour experiences as a teaching assistant to be scheduled with department faculty.

  • ASTR 1030 - Exploring the Universe

    3 credit hours

    A general introduction to astronomy through an overview of planets, stars, systems of stars, and the overall structure of the universe. Topics will be discussed by answering questions such as "How do you weigh stars?" and "Will the universe die?"

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA)

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 32 Hours

 

Junior

 

  • BIOL 1110 - General Biology  4 credit hours  AND

    BIOL 1110 - General Biology

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: BIOL 1111. Primarily for Biology majors and minors and other science-oriented students. Biological principles and processes, including introduction to the nature of science, cells (structure, function, metabolism, division), genetics, evolution, viruses, bacteria, protists, and fungi. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory. While BIOL 1110 can be used to fulfill half the 8-hour General Education requirement for Natural Sciences, it is the first semester of a two-semester sequence primarily designed for science majors.

  • PHYS 3610 - Thermodynamics  3 credit hours  OR

    PHYS 3610 - Thermodynamics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3110 and PHYS 3150 or consent of instructor. Introduction to statistical physics, kinetic theory, and thermodynamics from a unified microscopic point of view. Selected applications to various systems of interest presented.

  • PHYS 3510 - Concepts in Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3080 or PHYS 3110. Introduction to the concepts of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Discusses the fundamentals of thermodynamics from both the macroscopic and microscopic points of view including entropy, enthalpy, heat engines, Helmholtz and Gibbs free energy, the partition function, and quantum statistics. Not intended to prepare students for graduate school in physics.

  • PHYS 3800 - Physics Seminar  1 credit hour credit hours  

    PHYS 3800 - Physics Seminar

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite:  PHYS 3100. Develops and refines inquiry, communication, and presentation skills through exposure to new developments in physics, technical brief writing, and resume and job interview preparations.

  • PHYS 3930 - The Teaching of Physics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3950. Introduces physics teaching pedagogies resulting from physics education research. Methods studied to include inquiry, discovery, and modeling-based approaches. Seminar meeting will be supplemented with extensive experience as a learning assistant in a hands-on cooperative-learning and/or discovery-learning based introductory physics course.

  • PHYS 3950 - Physics Licensure I  1 credit hour credit hours  

    PHYS 3950 - Physics Licensure I

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2121 and MATH 1920. Overview of fundamental physics topics covered on licensure exams leading to endorsement to teach high school physics. Focuses on topics typically covered in the first semester of introductory physics. One one-hour, twenty-five minute lecture per week.  

  • PHYS 4850 - Physics Research  2 credit hours  

    PHYS 4850 - Physics Research

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Independent study of a selected research problem in physics. Includes experimental and/or theoretical investigation of an important, yet unexplored, problem. Includes literature research, experiment design/problem formulation and execution, resulting in oral and written presentation of results suitable for submission for publication in a suitable journal. One hour lecture and significant time working with research mentor.

  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours
  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours
  • Electives 6 credit hours

 

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 29 Hours

 

Senior

 

  • PHYS 3960 - Physics Licensure II  1 credit hour credit hours  

    PHYS 3960 - Physics Licensure II

    1 credit hour credit hours

     Prerequisite: PHYS 3950. Overview of fundamental physics covered on licensure exams that lead to endorsement to teach high school physics. Subject matter will focus on topics typically covered in the second semester of introductory physics. One-hour twenty-five minutes lecture per week.                    

  • PHYS 4900 - Physics Senior Thesis

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 4850 or PHYS 4860 and consent of department chair. Brings undergraduate experience to focus on a specific research problem; chosen with the consent of the thesis committee and with the potential for original discovery or for creative development of a tool or technique applicable to scientific research. Independent pursuit of research objectives outlined in a research proposal results in a written thesis whose approval will include an oral defense. One hour lecture and independent writing of thesis.

  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours
  • Electives 22 credit hours

Subtotal: 28 Hours

 

Total hours in program: 120

 

NOTE:

The minimum number of hours for graduation is 120; however, the number of hours required for this program may exceed this if students choose the Secondary Education Minor in addition to the Physics Teaching concentration.

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Physics, Physics Teaching, B.S., Academic Map  


Physics, Applied Physics Concentration, B.S.

Department of Physics and Astronomy 
615-898-2130
Ron Henderson, program coordinator
Ron.Henderson@mtsu.edu

The Applied Physics concentration is designed for students interested in fields not traditionally associated with a physics degree, but that value the critical thinking and problem-solving skills associated with a physics major.

Required Courses

 

  • PHYS 3150 - Topics and Methods of Theoretical Physics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2120 and MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Theoretical techniques used for problem solving in physics. Reference frames and coordinate systems, approximation techniques, solution of electrical circuits and mechanical systems, simple harmonic motion and wave motion, Maxwell's equations.

  • MATH 3120 - Differential Equations I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. The solution and application of ordinary differential equations with emphasis on first order equations, second order linear equations, Laplace Transform method, systems of differential equations, and numerical methods.

  • MATH 3110 - Calculus III  4 credit hours  

    MATH 3110 - Calculus III

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. Adjusts calculus techniques developed in the plane (Calculus I and II) to make them applicable in three-dimensional space. Introductory study of the nature of three-dimensional space and definition of the algebraic calculations in three-dimensional space. Differential and integral calculus definitions and techniques revised to appropriately transfer into this new space. Topics include multivariate functions, partial differentiation, partial integration, multiple integration, and multidisciplinary applications.

  • PHYS or ASTR electives (upper division) 5 credit hours
  • Cognate electives 15 credit hours
  • CSCI 1170 - Computer Science I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Sufficient background in algebra and trigonometry. The first of a two-semester sequence using a high-level language; language constructs and simple data structures such as arrays and strings. Emphasis on problem solving using the language and principles of structured software development. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours.

Cognate Elective Areas

 

Actuarial

 

  • STAT 3150 - Mathematical Statistics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Two semesters of calculus. Probability theory including basic probability laws, properties of distributions, mathematical expectation, special discrete and continuous distributions, functions of random variables, and selected applications.

  • STAT 4190 - Mathematical Statistics II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: STAT 3150 or equivalent. Theory of statistical inference. Topics include sampling distributions, decision theory, estimation, test of hypothesis, regression analysis, analysis of variance, and selected applications.

  • ACSI 4140 - Mathematical Foundations of Actuarial Science

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: MATH 3020 (or MATH 3110) and STAT 3150; or consent of instructor. Integrates calculus, probability, and risk management topics into fundamental tools for assessing risk in an actuarial environment. Calculus and probability topics include derivatives, integrals, partials, random variables, distributions, and conditional probability. Risk topics include frequency and severity. Insurance concepts such as retention, deductible, coinsurance, and risk premiums. For students in Actuarial Science, a preparatory course for the Society of Actuaries/Casualty Actuarial Society Course/Exam 1.

  • ACSI 4200 - Introduction to Mathematics of Investment

    3 credit hours

    (Same as MATH 4200.) Prerequisites: MATH 1910 and one semester of probability/statistics; or consent of instructor. Calculus and probability/statistics used to model and analyze investments in bonds, treasury bills, stocks, and other derivatives. Topics include obtaining the price of a bond as a function of interest rate, developing formulas for duration and convexity to study the sensitivity of price to interest rate, and mathematical modeling of investor preference and attitude toward risk.

  • MATH 4200 - Introduction to Mathematics of Investment

    3 credit hours

    (Same as ACSI 4200.) Prerequisites: MATH 1910 and one semester of probability/statistics; or consent of instructor. Calculus and probability/statistics used to model and analyze investments in bonds, treasury bills, stocks, and other derivatives. Topics include obtaining the price of a bond as a function of interest rate, developing formulas for duration and convexity to study the sensitivity of price to interest rate, and mathematical modeling of investor preference and attitude toward risk.

  • ACSI 4230 - Mathematics of Compound Interest

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ACSI 4200/MATH 4200 or consent of instructor. For students in Actuarial Science, offers preparation for the Society of Actuaries/Casualty Actuarial Society Exam 2. Topics include measurement of interest (including accumulated and present value factors), annuities certain, yield rates, amortization schedules, sinking funds, and bonds and related securities.

Advanced Physics

  •  PHYS/ASTR  Any upper division Physics or Astronomy

Business

 

  • ACTG 3000 - Survey of Accounting for General Business

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: A college-level math course; ENGL 1010; sophomore standing. Accounting cycle given minor emphasis; financial statement analysis and managerial uses of accounting given major emphasis. May be used for general business minors or M.B.A. candidates who have had no previous accounting courses. (Not open to Accounting majors and students with credit in ACTG 2110 and ACTG 2120.)

  • FIN 3000 - Principles of Financial Management

    3 credit hours

    Will not substitute for FIN 3010. An overview of the fundamental concepts and tools for financial decision making within a business firm. (Not open to business majors.)

  • FIN 3010 - Business Finance  3 credit hours  

    FIN 3010 - Business Finance

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing. Theory of corporate finance, emphasizing wealth creation, valuation, risk, capital budgeting, and cost of capital.

  • BLAW 3400 - Legal Environment of Business

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing. Legal rights and potential liabilities of business persons. Presentation of the dynamic nature of law in responding to the changing social, ethical, political, regulatory, and international environment. Includes the development and nature of the legal system; business crimes; the law of torts and product liability; constitutional limitations on regulatory powers; legislative, judicial, and administrative control of business activity through the laws of business organizations, securities regulations, antitrust laws, employment laws, labor and safety laws, and consumer protection.

  • BLAW 3430 - Commercial Law  3 credit hours  

    BLAW 3430 - Commercial Law

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Junior standing; admission into the College of Business. Legal rights and potential liabilities of business persons. Includes basic law of contracts; UCC; sales; commercial paper; secured transactions and credit; bankruptcy; personal property and bailments; real property; and wills, trusts, and estates.

  • MGMT 3610 - Principles of Management

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing. Concepts of the management functions of planning, organizing, and controlling with an emphasis on behavioral science concepts as applied to managing people in organizations.

  • MKT 3820 - Principles of Marketing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing. Survey of the functions, processes, and institutions involved in the distribution of consumer and industrial goods and services. Decision making in marketing management introduced.

Computational Methods

 

  • CSCI 2170 - Computer Science II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CSCI 1170 or equivalent. A continuation of CSCI 1170. Topics include introductory object-oriented programming techniques, software engineering principles, records, recursion, pointers, stacks and queues, linked lists, trees, and sorting and searching. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours.

  • CSCI 3037 - Computer Languages: Visual Programming

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CSCI 2170 or consent of instructor. An opportunity for a Computer Science major or minor to gain experience and training in a secondary language. Covers the syntax, advantages, disadvantages, limitations, and selected applications of a language. Credit will not be given toward a Computer Science major or minor if credit has been received for the same language in another course. Credit in secondary computer languages is limited to 3 hours for the major or minor.

  • CSCI 3160 - Introduction to Assembly Language

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CSCI 1170 or equivalent. Computer architecture and assembly language. Major emphasis on addressing techniques, macros, and program segmentation and linkage.

  • CSCI 3180 - Introduction to Numerical Analysis

    3 credit hours

    (Same as MATH 3180.) Prerequisites: MATH 1920 and either CSCI 1160 or CSCI 1170. Topics include series approximation, finite differences interpolation, summation, numerical differentiation and integration, iteration, curve fitting, systems of equations and matrices, and error analysis.

  • CSCI 3250 - Operating Systems

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CSCI 3240. Concepts and facilities of an operating system. Major concepts in memory, processor, device, and information management are covered as well as interrelationships between the operating system and the architecture of the computer system.

  • CSCI 4330 - Parallel Processing Concepts

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CSCI 3130 and CSCI 3240 or CSCI 3250. Basic concepts in parallel processing and programming in a parallel environment. Topics include classification of parallel architectures, study of actual parallel architectures, design and implementation of parallel programs, parallel software engineering.

Computer Applications

 

  • INFS 2400 - Web Development  3 credit hours  

    INFS 2400 - Web Development

    3 credit hours

    Web development using HTML, XHTML, CSS, JavaScript, and multimedia Web content. Covers planning, design, development, and publishing of a Web site.

  • INFS 3200 - Business Application Development

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Foundation knowledge of microcomputer applications; junior standing; admission into the College of Business. An applications-oriented course; extensive laboratory work and development of projects.

  • INFS 3400 - Object Oriented Programming with C#.NET

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: INFS 2600 or equivalent; admission to the College of Business. Introduction to object-oriented programming methods. Topics include objects and classes, encapsulation, inheritance and polymorphism, exceptions, graphical user-interfaces and event handling, streams and files, and deployment. Emphasis on practical applications of object-oriented concepts in a business context.

  • INFS 4300 - Security Assurance for Information Systems Audit

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Admission into the College of Business. An in-depth look at developing, implementing, monitoring, and auditing an information system's security. Managerial concepts for security of operating systems, administering security, and legal/ethical/policy issues examined as well as a hands-on approach to implementing operating systems security techniques. Explores the advancement in security detection and implementation, problem-solving techniques, and the role and importance of the information systems auditor.

  • INFS 4790 - Database Design and Development

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: INFS 3200; junior standing; and admission into the College of Business. Fundamental concepts: conventional data systems, integrated management information systems, database structure systems, data integration, complex file structure, online access systems. Emphasis on total integrated information systems database and database management languages.

Natural Science

 

  • BIOL 1110 - General Biology  4 credit hours  AND

    BIOL 1110 - General Biology

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: BIOL 1111. Primarily for Biology majors and minors and other science-oriented students. Biological principles and processes, including introduction to the nature of science, cells (structure, function, metabolism, division), genetics, evolution, viruses, bacteria, protists, and fungi. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory. While BIOL 1110 can be used to fulfill half the 8-hour General Education requirement for Natural Sciences, it is the first semester of a two-semester sequence primarily designed for science majors.

  • BIOL 1120 - General Biology  4 credit hours  AND

    BIOL 1120 - General Biology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111. Corequisite: BIOL 1121. Primarily for Biology majors and minors and other science-oriented students. Survey of plants and animals emphasizing evolution, structure, function, reproduction, growth, and ecology. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • BIOL 2230 - Microbiology  4 credit hours  AND

    BIOL 2230 - Microbiology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111 and BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121 orBIOL 2010/BIOL 2011 and BIOL 2020/BIOL 2021. Concepts and techniques pertaining to the morphology, physiology, reproduction, isolation, cultivation and identification of microorganisms with particular emphasis on bacteria. Topics include the impact of microorganisms in our daily lives, both adverse and beneficial. Background in General Chemistry is strongly recommended. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • CHEM 3010 - Organic Chemistry I  4 credit hours  AND

    CHEM 3010 - Organic Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121 or equivalent. Corequisite: CHEM 3011. Types of carbon compounds, their nomenclature, reactions, and physical properties. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • CHEM 3020 - Organic Chemistry II  4 credit hours  AND

    CHEM 3020 - Organic Chemistry II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 3010. Corequisite: CHEM 3021. A continuation of CHEM 3010. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • CHEM 3530 - Principles of Biochemistry

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 2030/CHEM 2031 or CHEM 3010/CHEM 3011. Corequisite: CHEM 3531. Structure, properties, and functions of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids and their reactions in living organisms. Three-hour lecture and one three-hour lab. Does not count toward Biochemistry major.

Operations

 

  • BCED 4670 - International Business Communication

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Junior standing; admission into the College of Business. Provides students with a theoretical and practical framework for understanding and conducting effective international business communication. Emphasis on the analysis and development of international business communication processes.

  • MGMT 3620 - Supply Chain Operations

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing. Focuses on the integration between supply chain operations strategies/decisions and their impact on other business functions in an organization. Examines operations management concepts using a global supply chain perspective. Covers topics such as inventory management, lean/just in time, project management, and supply-demand matching. Overarching goal of using supply chain operations strategies to develop a business competitive advantage reinforced. This is a writing-intensive course.

  • BIA 2610 - Statistical Methods

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1630 or MATH 1810. The application of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data to make business decisions. Topics include measures of central tendency, variation, probability theory, point and interval estimation, correlation and regression. Computer applications emphasized.

  • BIA 4010 - Business Analytics and Visualization

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: BIA 3620/BIA 3621 or an equivalent course. Development and application of industry-level analytic tools to visualize, model, and analyze business data. Opportunity to develop skills for self-service business analytics via hands-on approach.

 

  • BIA 3620 - Introduction to Business Analytics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIA 2610 or equivalent, junior standing. Corequisite: BIA 3621. Introduction to the concepts and application of data analytics in business. Spreadsheet software and associated analytic tools will be utilized to visualize, model, and analyze business data using a hands-on-approach.

Supplemental Math

 

  • MATH 2010 - Elements of Linear Algebra

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. Vectors and vector spaces, matrices and systems of linear equations, geometry of vector spaces and linear transformations in a vector space.

  • MATH 2050 - Probability and Statistics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Calculus I. Data analysis, probability, and statistical inference. The inference material covers means, proportions, and variances for one and two samples, one-way ANOVA, regression and correlation, and chi-square analysis.

  • MATH 3070 - College Geometry  3 credit hours  

    MATH 3070 - College Geometry

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 3460. Advanced treatment of standard topics in Euclidean geometry using informal and axiomatic approaches. Includes proofmaking techniques, traditional and transformational geometry, finite geometries, and a brief introduction to other geometries.

  • MATH 3260 - Differential Equations II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 3120. A continuation of MATH 3120 with emphasis on series solutions, method of Frobenius, orthogonal functions, equations of Bessel, Legendre, Gauss, Chebyshev; introduction to partial differential equations.

  • MATH 3460 - Foundation of Higher Mathematics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. The language of mathematics, set theory and proof, relations and functions, number systems, mathematical structures. Focuses on the transition from lower-division study to upper-division study by actively engaging the student in problem solving, mathematical reasoning, and both informal and technical writing.

Technology

 

  • ET 1210 - Introduction to Metals and Metallurgy

    3 credit hours

    Origin and behavior of metals. Extractive metallurgy--reduction of metallic ores, production of stock shapes, identification and selection of ferrous and nonferrous metals. Physical metallurgy--mechanical and physical properties, crystalline structure, phase diagrams, hardening and tempering, isothermal diagrams, metallurgy of welds, service problems, casting processes. Exercises in the use of basic welding, foundry, and metallurgical testing equipment. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 2310 - Computer-Assisted Drafting and Design I

    3 credit hours

    Covers basic technical drawing/sketching and drafting concepts using personal computers, plotters, and appropriate CAD software. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.  

  • ET 3210 - Machine Tool Technology

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ET 1210 and ET 2310. Metals, their sources, manufacture, and properties; basic metalworking hand tools, measurements; layout; drawing and safety. Exercises in the use of the basic machine tools in machine shop work. Lecture and laboratory. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3360 - Computer-Assisted Drafting and Design II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CMT 3320 or ET 2310. Utilizes PC and CAD software to develop skills in the creation and analysis of mechanical solid models for design and production purposes. Includes the use of shading and rendering to enhance three-dimensional model display and the extraction of two-dimensional engineering drawings. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4440 - Fire Safety  3 credit hours  

    ET 4440 - Fire Safety

    3 credit hours

    Fundamental methods of fire protection, prevention, and suppression. Includes characteristics and behavior of fire, fire hazards of materials and buildings, codes and standards for fire prevention and protection, fire protection equipment and systems, and fire fighting forces and how they operate.

  • ET 4630 - Local Area Networks

    3 credit hours

    Provides the necessary foundation experience to understand the design, implementation, and management strategies of local and wide area networks (LAN/WAN). Data Communication Standards and protocol, fundamentals included. Will include lecture, laboratory activities, and a LAN design requirement. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

Physics Common Requirements

The common requirements required of ALL Physics majors consist of

Physics Core (25 hours)

  • PHYS 1010 - Physics Colloquium  1 credit hour credit hours  

    PHYS 1010 - Physics Colloquium

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Introduces new physics and astronomy students to the physics major. Topics include degree requirements, faculty resources, research opportunities, and career options. Half of the meetings will involve one hour lectures during class, and half will involve attending talks, some of which may occur outside the scheduled class meeting time.

 

  • PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2011. Web-based discussion class to be taken in conjunction with cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2011. Classical mechanics traditionally covered in a first-semester college physics course. Kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Class time used for discussion of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2010. Group-oriented problems course taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2010. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2010 discussion class. Covers kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

OR

  • PHYS 2110 - Calculus-Based Physics I

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Corequisite: PHYS 2111. A calculus-based introduction to mechanics and wave motion. One and one-half hours lecture.

  • PHYS 2111 - Calculus-Based Physics Laboratory I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Corequisite: PHYS 2110. Laboratory course to accompany PHYS 2110. Experiments in mechanics, waves, and thermodynamics. Data reduction, error analysis, and report writing. Two three-hour sessions.

 

  • PHYS 2020 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics II

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2021. Web-based discussion class taken in conjunction with the cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2021. Fundamentals of optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. Scheduled class time is used for discussions of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2021 - Physics Problems Laboratory II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2020. Group-oriented problems course to be taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2020. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2020 discussion class. Optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. The skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

OR

  • PHYS 2120 - Calculus-Based Physics II

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2111; MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Required corequisite: PHYS 2121. A lecture course that supplements the discussion in PHYS 2121. Topics include a microscopic view of electrical force and field, polarization, electric circuits, magnetic force and field, electric potential, symmetries of fields, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic radiation, optics, and wave phenomena. One and one-half hours lecture.

  • PHYS 2121 - Calculus-Based Physics Laboratory II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2111; MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Required corequisite: PHYS 2120. A laboratory-based course to accompany PHYS 2120. Includes discussions, group problem solving, and hands-on activities. Two three-hour sessions.

 

  • PHYS 3100 - Modern Physics I  3 credit hours  *

    PHYS 3100 - Modern Physics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2120 and MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Introduction to the fundamental principles of modern physics (special relativity and quantum mechanics) and their application to atomic physics.

  • PHYS 3070 - Concepts in Modern Physics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2120 and MATH 1920. Introduction to the concepts of twentieth-century physics. Discusses fundamental concepts of modern physics including relativity, atomic physics, wave optics, and quantum mechanics. Not intended to prepare students for graduate school in physics.

  • PHYS 3110 - Modern Physics II  3 credit hours  *

    PHYS 3110 - Modern Physics II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3100. Survey of major topics including molecular physics, statistical physics, solid state physics and solid state devices, nuclear models, nuclear decay and reaction, and elementary particle physics.

  • PHYS 3080 - Concepts in Modern Physics II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3070 or PHYS 3100. Introduction to the concepts of twentieth-century physics. Discusses the fundamental concepts of modern physics including molecular physics, statistical distributions, solid state physics, and nuclear particle physics. Not intended to prepare students for graduate school in physics.

 

  • PHYS 3111 - Modern Physics Laboratory  1 credit hour credit hours  

    PHYS 3111 - Modern Physics Laboratory

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite or corequisite:  PHYS 3110. Concepts and ideas which formed the basis for an understanding of the atom and atomic phenomena. One hour lecture and one three-hour independent study laboratory.

  • PHYS 3610 - Thermodynamics  3 credit hours  *

    PHYS 3610 - Thermodynamics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3110 and PHYS 3150 or consent of instructor. Introduction to statistical physics, kinetic theory, and thermodynamics from a unified microscopic point of view. Selected applications to various systems of interest presented.

  • PHYS 3510 - Concepts in Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3080 or PHYS 3110. Introduction to the concepts of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Discusses the fundamentals of thermodynamics from both the macroscopic and microscopic points of view including entropy, enthalpy, heat engines, Helmholtz and Gibbs free energy, the partition function, and quantum statistics. Not intended to prepare students for graduate school in physics.

  • PHYS 3400 - Intermediate Physics

    3 credit hours

     Prerequisite: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2121 and MATH 1920. Provides an intermediated treatment of the principles of thermodynamics, electromagnetics, and oscillatory behavior with applications. Course is not intended for physics majors participating in the Professional Physics concentration. Three hours lecture.

  • PHYS 3800 - Physics Seminar  1 credit hour credit hours  

    PHYS 3800 - Physics Seminar

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite:  PHYS 3100. Develops and refines inquiry, communication, and presentation skills through exposure to new developments in physics, technical brief writing, and resume and job interview preparations.

  • PHYS 3900 - Physics Practicum  1 credit hour credit hours  

    PHYS 3900 - Physics Practicum

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite:  PHYS 3100 and consent of instructor. Refines thinking, communication, and interpersonal skills through exposure to on-the-spot technical questions and a laboratory teaching experience as an assistant in an introductory physics laboratory.  One hour lecture and two two-and-one-half  hour experiences as a teaching assistant to be scheduled with department faculty.

 

  • PHYS 4850 - Physics Research  2 credit hours  OR

    PHYS 4850 - Physics Research

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Independent study of a selected research problem in physics. Includes experimental and/or theoretical investigation of an important, yet unexplored, problem. Includes literature research, experiment design/problem formulation and execution, resulting in oral and written presentation of results suitable for submission for publication in a suitable journal. One hour lecture and significant time working with research mentor.

  • ASTR 4850 - Astronomy Research

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Independent study of a selected research problem in astronomy. Includes experimental and/or theoretical investigation of an important yet unexplored problem or experimental design. Includes literature research and experimental design/problem formulation and execution resulting in oral and written presentation of results suitable for submission/presentation to a suitable journal/conference. One hour lecture and significant additional time working with research mentor.

 

  • PHYS 4900 - Physics Senior Thesis

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 4850 or PHYS 4860 and consent of department chair. Brings undergraduate experience to focus on a specific research problem; chosen with the consent of the thesis committee and with the potential for original discovery or for creative development of a tool or technique applicable to scientific research. Independent pursuit of research objectives outlined in a research proposal results in a written thesis whose approval will include an oral defense. One hour lecture and independent writing of thesis.

  • ASTR 4900 - Astronomy Senior Thesis

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ASTR 4850 and consent of department chair. Focuses on a specific research/experimental design problem chosen with the consent of the thesis committee and with the potential for original discovery or for creative development of a tool, technique, or instrumentation applicable to scientific research. Independent pursuit of research objectives outlined in a research proposal results in a written thesis, the approval of which will include an oral defense. One hour lecture and independent writing of thesis.

NOTE:

* Substitutions are allowed as follows: PHYS 3100 (PHYS 3070), PHYS 3110 (PHYS 3080), and PHYS 3610 (PHYS 3510 or PHYS 3400).

Curriculum: Physics, Applied Physics

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine arts, Mathematics, Natural sciences, and Social/Behavioral Science categories.

Freshman

 

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm)

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  (Math)

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1920 - Calculus II  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1920 - Calculus II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910. A topics course providing a wide view of different techniques and applications of calculus in the plane. Techniques of integration and applications of integration fully developed. Power series and Taylor series included. Emphasis on multidisciplinary applications includes Taylor series approximation; applications of integration to physics, biology, and business; and geometric and power series applications. Graphing calculator required.

  • PHYS 1010 - Physics Colloquium  1 credit hour credit hours  

    PHYS 1010 - Physics Colloquium

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Introduces new physics and astronomy students to the physics major. Topics include degree requirements, faculty resources, research opportunities, and career options. Half of the meetings will involve one hour lectures during class, and half will involve attending talks, some of which may occur outside the scheduled class meeting time.

  • PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I  0 credit hours  (Nat Sci)

    PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2011. Web-based discussion class to be taken in conjunction with cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2011. Classical mechanics traditionally covered in a first-semester college physics course. Kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Class time used for discussion of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci)

    PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2010. Group-oriented problems course taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2010. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2010 discussion class. Covers kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

OR

  • PHYS 2110 - Calculus-Based Physics I  0 credit hours  (Nat Sci)

    PHYS 2110 - Calculus-Based Physics I

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Corequisite: PHYS 2111. A calculus-based introduction to mechanics and wave motion. One and one-half hours lecture.

  • PHYS 2111 - Calculus-Based Physics Laboratory I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Corequisite: PHYS 2110. Laboratory course to accompany PHYS 2110. Experiments in mechanics, waves, and thermodynamics. Data reduction, error analysis, and report writing. Two three-hour sessions.

  • PHYS 2020 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics II

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2021. Web-based discussion class taken in conjunction with the cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2021. Fundamentals of optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. Scheduled class time is used for discussions of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2021 - Physics Problems Laboratory II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2020. Group-oriented problems course to be taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2020. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2020 discussion class. Optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. The skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

OR

  • PHYS 2120 - Calculus-Based Physics II

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2111; MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Required corequisite: PHYS 2121. A lecture course that supplements the discussion in PHYS 2121. Topics include a microscopic view of electrical force and field, polarization, electric circuits, magnetic force and field, electric potential, symmetries of fields, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic radiation, optics, and wave phenomena. One and one-half hours lecture.

  • PHYS 2121 - Calculus-Based Physics Laboratory II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2111; MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Required corequisite: PHYS 2120. A laboratory-based course to accompany PHYS 2120. Includes discussions, group problem solving, and hands-on activities. Two three-hour sessions.

  • CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci)

    CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: High school chemistry. Corequisite: CHEM 1111. Fundamental concepts of atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometric relationships, periodic properties of the elements, thermochemistry, and properties of gases. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II  4 credit hours  AND

    CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Corequisite: CHEM 1121. Chemical equilibrium, solid and liquid states of matter, chemistry of acids and bases, principles of chemical kinetics, precipitation reactions, elementary thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

Subtotal: 31 Hours

 

Sophomore

 

  • PHYS 3100 - Modern Physics I  3 credit hours  OR

    PHYS 3100 - Modern Physics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2120 and MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Introduction to the fundamental principles of modern physics (special relativity and quantum mechanics) and their application to atomic physics.

  • PHYS 3070 - Concepts in Modern Physics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2120 and MATH 1920. Introduction to the concepts of twentieth-century physics. Discusses fundamental concepts of modern physics including relativity, atomic physics, wave optics, and quantum mechanics. Not intended to prepare students for graduate school in physics.

  • PHYS 3110 - Modern Physics II  3 credit hours  OR

    PHYS 3110 - Modern Physics II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3100. Survey of major topics including molecular physics, statistical physics, solid state physics and solid state devices, nuclear models, nuclear decay and reaction, and elementary particle physics.

  • PHYS 3080 - Concepts in Modern Physics II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3070 or PHYS 3100. Introduction to the concepts of twentieth-century physics. Discusses the fundamental concepts of modern physics including molecular physics, statistical distributions, solid state physics, and nuclear particle physics. Not intended to prepare students for graduate school in physics.

  • PHYS 3111 - Modern Physics Laboratory  1 credit hour credit hours  

    PHYS 3111 - Modern Physics Laboratory

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite or corequisite:  PHYS 3110. Concepts and ideas which formed the basis for an understanding of the atom and atomic phenomena. One hour lecture and one three-hour independent study laboratory.

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA)

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

  • PHYS 3150 - Topics and Methods of Theoretical Physics I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2120 and MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Theoretical techniques used for problem solving in physics. Reference frames and coordinate systems, approximation techniques, solution of electrical circuits and mechanical systems, simple harmonic motion and wave motion, Maxwell's equations.

  • MATH 3110 - Calculus III  4 credit hours  OR

    MATH 3110 - Calculus III

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. Adjusts calculus techniques developed in the plane (Calculus I and II) to make them applicable in three-dimensional space. Introductory study of the nature of three-dimensional space and definition of the algebraic calculations in three-dimensional space. Differential and integral calculus definitions and techniques revised to appropriately transfer into this new space. Topics include multivariate functions, partial differentiation, partial integration, multiple integration, and multidisciplinary applications.

  • MATH 3120 - Differential Equations I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1920. The solution and application of ordinary differential equations with emphasis on first order equations, second order linear equations, Laplace Transform method, systems of differential equations, and numerical methods.

  • PHYS 3900 - Physics Practicum  1 credit hour credit hours  

    PHYS 3900 - Physics Practicum

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite:  PHYS 3100 and consent of instructor. Refines thinking, communication, and interpersonal skills through exposure to on-the-spot technical questions and a laboratory teaching experience as an assistant in an introductory physics laboratory.  One hour lecture and two two-and-one-half  hour experiences as a teaching assistant to be scheduled with department faculty.

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

  • CSCI 1170 - Computer Science I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Sufficient background in algebra and trigonometry. The first of a two-semester sequence using a high-level language; language constructs and simple data structures such as arrays and strings. Emphasis on problem solving using the language and principles of structured software development. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours.

  • Elective 3 credit hours
  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours
  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 30-31 Hours

Junior

 

  • PHYS 3610 - Thermodynamics  3 credit hours  OR

    PHYS 3610 - Thermodynamics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3110 and PHYS 3150 or consent of instructor. Introduction to statistical physics, kinetic theory, and thermodynamics from a unified microscopic point of view. Selected applications to various systems of interest presented.

  • PHYS 3510 - Concepts in Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 3080 or PHYS 3110. Introduction to the concepts of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Discusses the fundamentals of thermodynamics from both the macroscopic and microscopic points of view including entropy, enthalpy, heat engines, Helmholtz and Gibbs free energy, the partition function, and quantum statistics. Not intended to prepare students for graduate school in physics.

  • PHYS 3400 - Intermediate Physics

    3 credit hours

     Prerequisite: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2121 and MATH 1920. Provides an intermediated treatment of the principles of thermodynamics, electromagnetics, and oscillatory behavior with applications. Course is not intended for physics majors participating in the Professional Physics concentration. Three hours lecture.

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

  • Humanities/Fine Arts (2 rubrics) 6 credit hours
  • Electives 6 credit hours
  • Cognate 6 credit hours
  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours
  • PHYS/ASTR (upper division) 3-4 credit hours

Subtotal: 30-31 Hours

 

Senior

 

  • PHYS 3800 - Physics Seminar  1 credit hour credit hours  

    PHYS 3800 - Physics Seminar

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite:  PHYS 3100. Develops and refines inquiry, communication, and presentation skills through exposure to new developments in physics, technical brief writing, and resume and job interview preparations.

  • Cognate 9 credit hours
  • Electives 12 credit hours
  • PHYS/ASTR (upper division) 2-3 credit hours
  • PHYS 4850 - Physics Research  2 credit hours  

    PHYS 4850 - Physics Research

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Independent study of a selected research problem in physics. Includes experimental and/or theoretical investigation of an important, yet unexplored, problem. Includes literature research, experiment design/problem formulation and execution, resulting in oral and written presentation of results suitable for submission for publication in a suitable journal. One hour lecture and significant time working with research mentor.

  • PHYS 4900 - Physics Senior Thesis

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PHYS 4850 or PHYS 4860 and consent of department chair. Brings undergraduate experience to focus on a specific research problem; chosen with the consent of the thesis committee and with the potential for original discovery or for creative development of a tool or technique applicable to scientific research. Independent pursuit of research objectives outlined in a research proposal results in a written thesis whose approval will include an oral defense. One hour lecture and independent writing of thesis.

Subtotal: 28-29 Hours

 

Total hours in program: 120

 

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Physics, Applied Physics, B.S., Academic Map  

Dr. Daniel Erenso
Associate Professor
daniel.erenso@mtsu.edu

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Jana Ford
Instructor
janaruth.ford@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Brian Frank
Assistant Professor
brian.frank@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Ron Henderson
Department Chair
ron.henderson@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Chuck Higgins
Associate Professor
chuck.higgins@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Eric Klumpe
Professor
eric.klumpe@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Victor Montemayor
Professor
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Dr. Suman Neupane
http://www.mtsu.edu/faculty/sneupane/index.php
Suman.Neupane@mtsu.edu

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Dr. William Robertson
Professor
william.robertson@mtsu.edu

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Dr. Nat Smith
Assistant Professor
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Dr. John Wallin
Professor
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Dr. Martha Weller
Professor
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Physics

PHYS 1010 - Physics Colloquium
1 credit hour credit

Introduces new physics and astronomy students to the physics major. Topics include degree requirements, faculty resources, research opportunities, and career options. Half of the meetings will involve one hour lectures during class, and half will involve attending talks, some of which may occur outside the scheduled class meeting time.

PHYS 1110 - Discovering Physics
4 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 1710, MATH 1730, or MATH 1630. Uncovers the fundamental concepts of physics in a hands-on approach that involves observations, measurements, forming hypotheses, and validation of ideas in groups of students' peers. Combined lecture/laboratory sessions.

PHYS 1600 - Physics of Music
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 1710 or consent of instructor. The physics of music, acoustics, and sound for students without prior physics background.

PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I
0 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2011. Web-based discussion class to be taken in conjunction with cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2011. Classical mechanics traditionally covered in a first-semester college physics course. Kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Class time used for discussion of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I
4 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730. Required corequisite: PHYS 2010. Group-oriented problems course taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2010. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2010 discussion class. Covers kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

PHYS 2020 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics II
0 credit hours

Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2021. Web-based discussion class taken in conjunction with the cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2021. Fundamentals of optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. Scheduled class time is used for discussions of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

PHYS 2021 - Physics Problems Laboratory II
4 credit hours

Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2020. Group-oriented problems course to be taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2020. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2020 discussion class. Optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. The skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

PHYS 2110 - Calculus-Based Physics I
0 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 1910 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Corequisite: PHYS 2111. A calculus-based introduction to mechanics and wave motion. One and one-half hours lecture.

PHYS 2111 - Calculus-Based Physics Laboratory I
4 credit hours

Prerequisite: MATH 1910 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Corequisite: PHYS 2110. Laboratory course to accompany PHYS 2110. Experiments in mechanics, waves, and thermodynamics. Data reduction, error analysis, and report writing. Two three-hour sessions.

PHYS 2120 - Calculus-Based Physics II
0 credit hours

Prerequisites: PHYS 2111; MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Required corequisite: PHYS 2121. A lecture course that supplements the discussion in PHYS 2121. Topics include a microscopic view of electrical force and field, polarization, electric circuits, magnetic force and field, electric potential, symmetries of fields, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic radiation, optics, and wave phenomena. One and one-half hours lecture.

PHYS 2121 - Calculus-Based Physics Laboratory II
4 credit hours

Prerequisites: PHYS 2111; MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Required corequisite: PHYS 2120. A laboratory-based course to accompany PHYS 2120. Includes discussions, group problem solving, and hands-on activities. Two three-hour sessions.

PHYS 3000 - Acoustics and Signal Analysis
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: PHYS 1600 and MATH 1910. Detailed overview of acoustics including an introduction to digital signals and their analysis. Application areas include architectural, musical, and environmental acoustics. Intended for students interested in the technical side of the music industry.

PHYS 3050 - Directed Study in Physics
1 to 4 credit hours

Prerequisites: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2120 and approval of department chair. Individualized intensive study of a specific topic in physics not normally covered to the extent desired in the standard curriculum. Arrangements must be made with an approved faculty member prior to registration.

PHYS 3070 - Concepts in Modern Physics I
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2120 and MATH 1920. Introduction to the concepts of twentieth-century physics. Discusses fundamental concepts of modern physics including relativity, atomic physics, wave optics, and quantum mechanics. Not intended to prepare students for graduate school in physics.

PHYS 3080 - Concepts in Modern Physics II
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PHYS 3070 or PHYS 3100. Introduction to the concepts of twentieth-century physics. Discusses the fundamental concepts of modern physics including molecular physics, statistical distributions, solid state physics, and nuclear particle physics. Not intended to prepare students for graduate school in physics.

PHYS 3100 - Modern Physics I
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2120 and MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Introduction to the fundamental principles of modern physics (special relativity and quantum mechanics) and their application to atomic physics.

PHYS 3110 - Modern Physics II
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PHYS 3100. Survey of major topics including molecular physics, statistical physics, solid state physics and solid state devices, nuclear models, nuclear decay and reaction, and elementary particle physics.

PHYS 3111 - Modern Physics Laboratory
1 credit hour credit

Prerequisite or corequisite:  PHYS 3110. Concepts and ideas which formed the basis for an understanding of the atom and atomic phenomena. One hour lecture and one three-hour independent study laboratory.

PHYS 3150 - Topics and Methods of Theoretical Physics I
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2120 and MATH 1920 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Theoretical techniques used for problem solving in physics. Reference frames and coordinate systems, approximation techniques, solution of electrical circuits and mechanical systems, simple harmonic motion and wave motion, Maxwell's equations.

PHYS 3160 - Topics and Methods of Theoretical Physics II
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PHYS 3150. A continuation of PHYS 3150. The Schroedinger equation, heat flow, diffusion, the Lagrangian description of motion.

PHYS 3200 - Scientific Modeling and Problem Solving
2 credit hours

Prerequisites: One year of physics and MATH 1920 or consent of instructor. Techniques of computational physics as applied to the solution of scientific problems.

PHYS 3300 - Classical Mechanics
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PHYS 3150 (or PHYS 2120 and MATH 3120). Mechanics (including statics and dynamics) of particles in three dimensions using vector analysis, motion of rigid bodies, Lagrangian mechanics, and Hamilton's equations.

PHYS 3310 - Concepts and Applications of Digital Electronics
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2120 or ET 3610. Investigates applications of modern digital technology. Fundamentals of logic gates and programmable devices examined along with contemporary integrated circuits for use in data acquisition and the control of scientific experiments. Sound cards, alarm systems, and laboratory measurement circuits typify projects constructed in the hands-on laboratory. Two hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

PHYS 3330 - Health Physics and Radiation Protection
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2120. Radiation protection methods, dosimetry techniques, and survey instruments. Practical knowledge of the methodology for paramedical personnel, industrial workers, and others who deal with radioisotopes and X-ray equipment. Two hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

PHYS 3350 - Concepts and Applications of Analog Electronics
4 credit hours

Prerequisite: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2121 or  ET 3610. Introduction to contemporary analog electronics utilizing integrated circuits to treat traditional circuits, power supplies, operational amplifiers, comparators, and multivibrators. Conversion of analog to digital signal for interfacing to microcomputers. Emphasis on practical applications. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

PHYS 3400 - Intermediate Physics
3 credit hours

 Prerequisite: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2121 and MATH 1920. Provides an intermediated treatment of the principles of thermodynamics, electromagnetics, and oscillatory behavior with applications. Course is not intended for physics majors participating in the Professional Physics concentration. Three hours lecture.

PHYS 3510 - Concepts in Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PHYS 3080 or PHYS 3110. Introduction to the concepts of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Discusses the fundamentals of thermodynamics from both the macroscopic and microscopic points of view including entropy, enthalpy, heat engines, Helmholtz and Gibbs free energy, the partition function, and quantum statistics. Not intended to prepare students for graduate school in physics.

PHYS 3600 - Radiation Oncology Physics
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: MATH 1910 and a one-year introductory sequence in physics. Introduction to  field of radiation oncology physics, including a discussion of fundamental physics and techniques associated with the diagnosis and treatment of cancer using electromagnetic radiation and particle beams. Includes experiences in a radiation oncology clinic and interactions with practicing medical physicists.

PHYS 3601 - Medical Physics Practicum
1 credit hour credit

Prerequisite or corequisite: PHYS 3600. Real-world/clinical applications of concepts and theory from PHYS 3600, especially those associated with detectors and dosimetry. May include hands-on activities at the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center.

PHYS 3610 - Thermodynamics
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PHYS 3110 and PHYS 3150 or consent of instructor. Introduction to statistical physics, kinetic theory, and thermodynamics from a unified microscopic point of view. Selected applications to various systems of interest presented.

PHYS 3800 - Physics Seminar
1 credit hour credit

Prerequisite:  PHYS 3100. Develops and refines inquiry, communication, and presentation skills through exposure to new developments in physics, technical brief writing, and resume and job interview preparations.

PHYS 3900 - Physics Practicum
1 credit hour credit

Prerequisite:  PHYS 3100 and consent of instructor. Refines thinking, communication, and interpersonal skills through exposure to on-the-spot technical questions and a laboratory teaching experience as an assistant in an introductory physics laboratory.  One hour lecture and two two-and-one-half  hour experiences as a teaching assistant to be scheduled with department faculty.

PHYS 3910 - Advanced Physics Laboratory
1 credit hour credit

Prerequisites:  PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2120 and PHYS 2121. The skills, art, and physics important in pursuing independent research. Experiments dealing with mechanical, optical, or thermodynamic principles explored. Report writing, literature research, and the use of analysis tools emphasized. One hour lecture and one three-hour independent study laboratory.

PHYS 3920 - Advanced Physics Laboratory
1 credit hour credit

Prerequisites: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2120 and PHYS 2121. The skills, art, and physics important in pursuing independent research. Experiments dealing with mechanical, optical, or thermodynamic principles explored. Report writing, literature research, and the use of analysis tools emphasized.

PHYS 3930 - The Teaching of Physics
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PHYS 3950. Introduces physics teaching pedagogies resulting from physics education research. Methods studied to include inquiry, discovery, and modeling-based approaches. Seminar meeting will be supplemented with extensive experience as a learning assistant in a hands-on cooperative-learning and/or discovery-learning based introductory physics course.

PHYS 3950 - Physics Licensure I
1 credit hour credit

Prerequisites: PHYS 2021 or PHYS 2121 and MATH 1920. Overview of fundamental physics topics covered on licensure exams leading to endorsement to teach high school physics. Focuses on topics typically covered in the first semester of introductory physics. One one-hour, twenty-five minute lecture per week.  

PHYS 3960 - Physics Licensure II
1 credit hour credit

 Prerequisite: PHYS 3950. Overview of fundamental physics covered on licensure exams that lead to endorsement to teach high school physics. Subject matter will focus on topics typically covered in the second semester of introductory physics. One-hour twenty-five minutes lecture per week.                    

PHYS 4310 - Electricity and Magnetism
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PHYS 3160. Topics including electric and magnetic fields, electrostatic potential, and potential energy and fields in matter, discussed in a mathematically rigorous manner. A variety of good applications of mathematical methods in physics.

PHYS 4330 - Electricity and Magnetism II
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PHYS 4310. Topics include theory of electromagnetic radiation, production and propagation of electromagnetic waves, and the solution of boundary-value problems with applications to optics, wave guides, and lasers.

PHYS 4380 - Quantum Mechanics
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: PHYS 3110 and PHYS 3160. Topics include both one- and three-dimensional solutions to the Schroedinger equation, including the infinite square-well, finite square-well, tunneling, the harmonic oscillator, and the hydrogen atom with a discussion of angular momentum at a mathematically rigorous undergraduate level.

PHYS 4390 - Advanced Quantum Mechanics
3 credit hours

 Prerequisite: PHYS 4380. Advanced topics in quantum mechanics, including time-independent and time-dependent perturbation theory, systems of indistinguishable particles, the Aharonov-Bohm effect, Fermi's Golden Rule, and an introduction to quantum field theory.

PHYS 4600 - Topics in Medical Physics
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: PHYS 3110 and PHYS 3160. Topics in medical physics at an advanced undergraduate level. Possible topics include charged-particle interactions and equilibrium in matter, cavity theory, dosimetry, CTs, and MRIs.

PHYS 4630 - Principles of the Solid State
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: PHYS 3110 and PHYS 3150. Includes crystal structures, lattice dynamics, statistics of conductors and semiconductors, thermal properties, the metallic state, free electron theory, band theory of solids, dielectric and magnetic properties of solids, and the low temperature behavior of matter, particularly solids. Three hours lecture.

PHYS 4740 - Research Methods
3 credit hours

(Same as BIOL/CHEM/MATH 4740.) Prerequisite: YOED 3520. Provides secondary science and mathematics teacher candidates with the tools that scientists use to solve scientific problems. Students will use these tools in a laboratory setting, communicate findings, and understand how scientists develop new knowledge.

PHYS 4800 - Special Topics in Physics, Special Topics A
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: An extensive physics background and permission of instructor. Detailed study of a selected topic of current interest in physics not normally covered in the regular undergraduate physics curriculum. Possible topics include advanced atomic physics, high-energy physics (nuclear and elementary particles), scattering theory, astrophysics, and general relativity.

PHYS 4810 - Special Topics in Physics, Special Topics B
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: An extensive physics background and permission of instructor. Detailed study of a selected topic of current interest in physics not normally covered in the regular undergraduate physics curriculum. Possible topics include advanced atomic physics, high-energy physics (nuclear and elementary particles), scattering theory, astrophysics, and general relativity.

PHYS 4850 - Physics Research
2 credit hours

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Independent study of a selected research problem in physics. Includes experimental and/or theoretical investigation of an important, yet unexplored, problem. Includes literature research, experiment design/problem formulation and execution, resulting in oral and written presentation of results suitable for submission for publication in a suitable journal. One hour lecture and significant time working with research mentor.

PHYS 4860 - Physics Research
2 credit hours

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Independent study of a selected research problem in physics. Includes experimental and/or theoretical investigation of an important, yet unexplored, problem. Includes literature research, experiment design/problem formulation and execution, resulting in oral and written presentation of results suitable for submission for publication in a suitable journal. One hour lecture and significant additional time working with research mentor.

PHYS 4900 - Physics Senior Thesis
2 credit hours

Prerequisites: PHYS 4850 or PHYS 4860 and consent of department chair. Brings undergraduate experience to focus on a specific research problem; chosen with the consent of the thesis committee and with the potential for original discovery or for creative development of a tool or technique applicable to scientific research. Independent pursuit of research objectives outlined in a research proposal results in a written thesis whose approval will include an oral defense. One hour lecture and independent writing of thesis.

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