• At NASA's annual race, MTSU's lunar rover team is consistently the state's number one
  • Opportunities to learn by doing are open to all University students
  • MTSU students develop,
    design, and mold entries for the yearly
    Solar Splash competition
  • Alumnus Darrell Freeman started a MTSU students develop,
    design, and mold entries for the yearly
    Solar Splash competitionsuccessful business that now employs more than 300 people

Engineering Technology

When it comes to engineering technology, classroom discussion can only go so far in exposing students to the challenges posed by the real world. MTSU's Engineering Technology program excels at placing students in contact with industry professionals in a stimulating and encouraging environment in which to acquire and test the skills and knowledge they will need after college.

Come along for the ride!

Come along for the ride!

Established in 2004, the Experimental Vehicles Program (EVP) currently comprises four different undergraduate research projects. From moonbuggies and solar boats to SAE Formula One and SAE Mini Baja racing, teams take part in national and even global competitions while gaining valuable experience on how to work in a collaborative environment. Although these projects are geared towards students in the Engineering Technology Department, any MTSU student with enthusiasm and a willingness to learn is welcome to join in on the competitions.

Building a career

Building a career

The Robert E. and Georgianna West Russell Chair of Manufacturing Excellence is designed to promote quality interaction with local industry. Students are encouraged to benefit from the scheduled activities, seminars, and short courses sponsored by the Chair of Manufacturing Excellence. The chair is just one of the many ways by which the Engineering Technology department provides students with a career-oriented, hands-on education through nationally accredited programs.

While many engineering schools focus on the theoretical, MTSU's Engineering Technology program excels in providing hands-on experiences and skills that are immediately transferrable to the workforce. Examples include

  • Applications engineer
  • Energy applications manager
  • Energy operations engineer
  • Energy systems quality engineer
  • Engineering technologist
  • Field engineer
  • Lighting shop technician
  • Management trainee
  • Power plant manager
  • Professor
  • Project manager
  • Sales representative
  • Senior technical associate
  • Software engineer

Employers of MTSU alumni include

  • Automation nth
  • Bridgestone
  • Calsonic Kansei
  • Carrier
  • EM-Tech
  • FloStor Engineering, Inc.
  • General Mills
  • General Motors
  • Mahle
  • Nissan
  • Schneider Electric
  • Southeastern Technologies
  • SW Manufacturing
  • TVA
  • USA ZAMA
  • Vought Industries

A student majoring in Engineering Technology can pursue a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree in one of three concentrations: Computer Engineering Technology, Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology, or Mechanical Engineering Technology.

For complete curriculum details, click on the REQUIREMENTS tab above.

The department offers two other majors leading to a B.S.: Environmental Sustainability and Technology and Mechatronics Engineering. Interested students may take courses in Pre-engineering.

Undergraduate minors available include Electronics, Engineering Systems, and Engineering Technology.

Graduate students can pursue a Master of Science (M.S.) degree in either Engineering Technology or Occupational Health and Safety.

Computer Engineering Technology Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology Mechanical Engineering Technology


Engineering Technology, Computer Engineering Technology Concentration, B.S.

Department of Engineering Technology 
615-898-2776
Saleh Sbenaty, program director
Saleh.Sbenaty@mtsu.edu

Engineering Technology is a technologically advanced program at the Bachelor of Science level utilizing theoretical concepts and hands-on instruction. Program selection is from the following concentrations: Computer Engineering Technology, Electromechanical Engineering Technology, and Mechanical Engineering Technology.

The Computer Engineering Technology concentration requires 53 hours and is accredited by ABET, Inc. (http://www.abet.org) and provides the student with a sound technical base in electric and electronic circuits, digital systems, and computer hardware and software. Microcontroller, microprocessor, FPGA, embedded system, and microcomputer applications in the area of control and automation as well as programming, data acquisition, transfer, and analysis are also emphasized.

Employment opportunities exist in various industrial fields that require the design and applications of digital computers such as manufacturing, medical, aerospace, control, instrumentation and measurements, and networking, installations, and maintenance of computers.

NOTE: A grade of C or better is required on transfer credits accepted as part of a major in Engineering Technology.

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Engineering Technology, Computer Engineering Technology, B.S., Academic Map  

Degree Requirements

General Education (41 hours)

General Education requirements (shown in curricular listings below) include courses in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences.

The following General Education courses are required for this major:

  • MATH 1730 (Math)
  • CHEM 1110/1111 (Nat Sci)
  • PHYS 2010/2011 (Nat Sci)

Major Requirements (53 hours)

Engineering Technology Core (22 hours)

  • ENGR 1100 - Engineering Fundamentals

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1630 or MATH 1730. Introduces various engineering fields. Emphasis on problem-solving techniques and the use of mathematics in analyzing technical problems. Topics such as graphical representation of data, estimation, dimensions, units, error estimates, statistics, and team work addressed. Engineering ethics and impact of engineering solutions on society and the environment.

  • ENGR 3915 - Technical Project Management and Soft Skills

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Project management as sanctioned by the International Project Management Institute and how to assess and boost emotional intelligence or soft skills. Student successfully completing course will earn 20 Professional Development Units (PDUs) issued by the International Project Management Institute.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4915.

  • ENGR 3920 - Engineering Safety

    3 credit hours

    Safety and health in the manufacturing, construction, and utilities industries, including pertinent laws, codes, regulations, standards, and product liability considerations. Organizational and administrative principles and practices for safety management and safety engineering, accident investigation, safety education, and safety enforcement.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4420 - Industrial Safety.

  • ENGR 3970 - Engineering Economy

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Development of capital budgets. Justification of capital projects using time value of money concepts. Replacement analysis. Review of justification of actual capital projects and computer applications. Introduces economic risk assessment and Lean Six Sigma from an economic viewpoint.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4970.

  • ET 3601 - Electrical Circuit Analysis I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGR 1100 and MATH 1910. Fundamentals of electrical circuits. Addresses basic circuit components and quantities. Emphasis on DC circuit calculations and theorems. Uses lab equipment to build and test DC circuits. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3602 - Electrical Circuit Analysis II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3601 and MATH 1910. Addresses basic circuit components and quantities of AC circuits. Introduces three-phase circuits and transformers. Emphasis on AC circuit calculations and theorems. Uses lab equipment to build and test AC circuits. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4710 - Professional Development Seminar  1 credit hour credit hours  

    ET 4710 - Professional Development Seminar

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior status. Orientation to industrial job opportunities, placement practices, interview techniques, and preparation of application materials (resume, cover letter, and portfolio if warranted). Guest lecturers, films, and student and faculty presentations arranged in seminar fashion. One-hour lecture weekly.

Computer Engineering Technology Capstone

 

  • ET 4801 - Computer Engineering Technology  1 to 3 credit hours  (3 credit hours required) 

    ET 4801 - Computer Engineering Technology

    1 to 3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ET 4670; CSCI 3160. All required freshman-, sophomore-, and junior-level courses in all disciplines have to be completed before registering for this course. Engineering situations are solved by experimental means. Student must have experimental approach, gather data, interpret results, and prepare a formal technical written and oral report.

Computer Engineering Technology Concentration (31 hours)

  • ET 3620 - Digital Circuits Fundamentals

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3601 or permission of instructor. Provides thorough coverage of basic digital electronic circuits analysis and design. TTL and CMOS families examined. Number systems, mapping, and minimization techniques covered. Digital design using random logic and programmable logic devices (FPGAs and CPLDs). Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3630 - Electronics  3 credit hours  

    ET 3630 - Electronics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. Introduction to analog electronics. Defines basic parameters and theory of operation of discrete semiconductor devices. Introduces fundamentals of electronic circuits analysis and design. Applications illustrate use and laboratory projects provide hands-on experience. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3640 - Digital Circuits Design

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3620; corequisite: ET 3630 or permission of instructor. In-depth study of sequential circuit analysis and design that includes sate machine design. Emphasis on the use of available development boards using both FPGAs and CPLDs and their respective CAD tools. PLDs programmed using latest relative CAD systems. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3650 - Introduction to Microprocessors

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CSCI 1170 and ET 3620. Covers architecture of microcontrollers and microprocessor-based systems and their related components. Machine language programming extensively used to solve problems and demonstrate the relationship of the microprocessor and its supporting peripherals. Basic microcomputer architecture also emphasized. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3670 - Computer-Assisted Printed Circuit Board Design

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ET 3620 and ET 3630 or permission of instructor. Utilizes computer software to develop skills in creating schematic and printed circuit board artwork for use in printed circuit board production. Includes plotting, printing, and generating all necessary documents required for fabrication. One hour lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4600 - Programmable Logic Controllers

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. Introduction to programmable logic controllers (PLCs). Selection, operation, and troubleshooting. Ladder diagrams and programming of PLC emphasized. One hour lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4610 - Instrumentation and Controls

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ET 3620 and ET 3630. Devices and techniques used in the measurement of physical parameters. Consideration of accuracies and sources of error, identification of typical measurements, sensors and transducers, control stability and response. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4630 - Local Area Networks

    3 credit hours

    Provides the necessary foundation experience to understand the design, implementation, and management strategies of local and wide area networks (LAN/WAN). Data Communication Standards and protocol, fundamentals included. Will include lecture, laboratory activities, and a LAN design requirement. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4640 - Industrial Electricity

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. AC power theory and circuits for industrial applications, polyphase systems, power factor correction, and transformers. Theory, applications, and selection of motors and generators. Industrial motor control and power transmission. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4660 - Microprocessor Interfacing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ET 3640 and ET 3650 or permission of instructor. Emphasis on interfacing various analog and digital devices to a microcontroller/microprocessor-based system: memory expansion, A/D and D/A, display devices, keyboards and keypads, electromechanical devices, and sensors. PLDs (FPGAs/CPLDs) interfaced to facilitate rapid prototyping of digital system design. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4670 - Microprocessor Design

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ET 3640 and ET 4660 or permission of instructor. Advanced microprocessor system design. Emphasis on the design of core CPUs and imbedded components using high-density FPGA/CPLD development boards. Industrial applications of microprocessor-based systems. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

Supporting Courses (30 hours)

  • CSCI 1170 - Computer Science I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. The first of a two-semester sequence using a high-level language; language constructs and simple data structures such as arrays and strings. Emphasis on problem solving using the language and principles of structured software development. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hour.

  • CSCI 2170 - Computer Science II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. A continuation of CSCI 1170. Topics include introductory object-oriented programming techniques, software engineering principles, records, recursion, pointers, stacks and queues, linked lists, trees, and sorting and searching. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours.

  • CSCI 3160 - Introduction to Assembly Language

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CSCI 1170 or equivalent. Computer architecture and assembly language. Major emphasis on addressing techniques, macros, and program segmentation and linkage.

  • CSCI 3180 - Introduction to Numerical Analysis

    3 credit hours

    (Same as MATH 3180.) Prerequisites: MATH 1920 and either CSCI 1160 or CSCI 1170. Topics include series approximation, finite differences interpolation, summation, numerical differentiation and integration, iteration, curve fitting, systems of equations and matrices, and error analysis.

  • ENGL 3620 - Professional Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Completion of English and literature General Education requirements; ENGL 1020 or ENGL 3605 with a B- or better. A specialized composition course for students planning to enter the professional workplace, including industry, science, and government. Collaborative practice in the discourse and conventions of professional and technical writing: employment packages, memoranda, instructions, proposals, and reports.

  • MATH 1730 - Pre-Calculus  4 credit hours  (3 credit hours counted in General Education, 1 credit hour remaining) 

    MATH 1730 - Pre-Calculus

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 or successful completion of high school precalculus course. An integrated and rigorous study of the algebra and trigonometry needed to successfully attempt calculus. Emphasis on functions, their analysis and their applications. Level of algebraic sophistication developed above that found in MATH 1710. Topics include exponentials and logarithms, analysis of graphs, and word problems. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1920 - Calculus II  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1920 - Calculus II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910 with C (2.00) or better. A topics course providing a wide view of different techniques and applications of calculus in the plane. Techniques of integration and applications of integration fully developed. Power series and Taylor series included. Emphasis on multidisciplinary applications includes Taylor series approximation; applications of integration to physics, biology, and business; and geometric and power series applications. Graphing calculator required.

 

  • PHYS 2020 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics II

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2021. Web-based discussion class taken in conjunction with the cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2021. Fundamentals of optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. Scheduled class time is used for discussions of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2021 - Physics Problems Laboratory II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2020. Group-oriented problems course to be taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2020. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2020 discussion class. Optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. The skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

Optional Computer Science Minor

The minor will include CSCI 1170, CSCI 2170, CSCI 3160, CSCI 3180 (14 hours) and at least 3 additional hours in upper-division computer science courses as approved by the minor and major advisors.

Total hours in program: 124

 

Curriculum: Engineering Technology, Computer Engineering Technology

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories.

Students should consult their advisors each semester to plan their schedules.

Freshman

 

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  (Comm) 

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • MATH 1730 - Pre-Calculus  4 credit hours  (Math) 

    MATH 1730 - Pre-Calculus

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 or successful completion of high school precalculus course. An integrated and rigorous study of the algebra and trigonometry needed to successfully attempt calculus. Emphasis on functions, their analysis and their applications. Level of algebraic sophistication developed above that found in MATH 1710. Topics include exponentials and logarithms, analysis of graphs, and word problems. Graphing calculator required.

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required.

  • ENGR 1100 - Engineering Fundamentals

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1630 or MATH 1730. Introduces various engineering fields. Emphasis on problem-solving techniques and the use of mathematics in analyzing technical problems. Topics such as graphical representation of data, estimation, dimensions, units, error estimates, statistics, and team work addressed. Engineering ethics and impact of engineering solutions on society and the environment.

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication  3 credit hours  (Comm) 

    COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Emphasis on informative, persuasive, special occasion, and extemporaneous (impromptu) speaking. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement.

  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours
  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours

 

  • CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I  4 credit hours  (Nat Sci)  AND 

    CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: High school chemistry. Corequisite: CHEM 1111. Fundamental concepts of atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometric relationships, periodic properties of the elements, thermochemistry, and properties of gases. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

Subtotal: 30 Hours

 

Sophomore

 

  • MATH 1920 - Calculus II  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1920 - Calculus II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1910 with C (2.00) or better. A topics course providing a wide view of different techniques and applications of calculus in the plane. Techniques of integration and applications of integration fully developed. Power series and Taylor series included. Emphasis on multidisciplinary applications includes Taylor series approximation; applications of integration to physics, biology, and business; and geometric and power series applications. Graphing calculator required.

 

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR 

    ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) OR 

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation  3 credit hours  (Hum/FA) 

    HUM 2610 - Foreign Literature in Translation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

 

  • ENGL 3620 - Professional Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Completion of English and literature General Education requirements; ENGL 1020 or ENGL 3605 with a B- or better. A specialized composition course for students planning to enter the professional workplace, including industry, science, and government. Collaborative practice in the discourse and conventions of professional and technical writing: employment packages, memoranda, instructions, proposals, and reports.

  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours
  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours
  • ET 3601 - Electrical Circuit Analysis I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGR 1100 and MATH 1910. Fundamentals of electrical circuits. Addresses basic circuit components and quantities. Emphasis on DC circuit calculations and theorems. Uses lab equipment to build and test DC circuits. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3602 - Electrical Circuit Analysis II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3601 and MATH 1910. Addresses basic circuit components and quantities of AC circuits. Introduces three-phase circuits and transformers. Emphasis on AC circuit calculations and theorems. Uses lab equipment to build and test AC circuits. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3620 - Digital Circuits Fundamentals

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3601 or permission of instructor. Provides thorough coverage of basic digital electronic circuits analysis and design. TTL and CMOS families examined. Number systems, mapping, and minimization techniques covered. Digital design using random logic and programmable logic devices (FPGAs and CPLDs). Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • CSCI 1170 - Computer Science I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. The first of a two-semester sequence using a high-level language; language constructs and simple data structures such as arrays and strings. Emphasis on problem solving using the language and principles of structured software development. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hour.

  • CSCI 2170 - Computer Science II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. A continuation of CSCI 1170. Topics include introductory object-oriented programming techniques, software engineering principles, records, recursion, pointers, stacks and queues, linked lists, trees, and sorting and searching. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours.

Subtotal: 33 Hours

 

Junior

 

  • ET 3630 - Electronics  3 credit hours  

    ET 3630 - Electronics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. Introduction to analog electronics. Defines basic parameters and theory of operation of discrete semiconductor devices. Introduces fundamentals of electronic circuits analysis and design. Applications illustrate use and laboratory projects provide hands-on experience. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3640 - Digital Circuits Design

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3620; corequisite: ET 3630 or permission of instructor. In-depth study of sequential circuit analysis and design that includes sate machine design. Emphasis on the use of available development boards using both FPGAs and CPLDs and their respective CAD tools. PLDs programmed using latest relative CAD systems. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3650 - Introduction to Microprocessors

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CSCI 1170 and ET 3620. Covers architecture of microcontrollers and microprocessor-based systems and their related components. Machine language programming extensively used to solve problems and demonstrate the relationship of the microprocessor and its supporting peripherals. Basic microcomputer architecture also emphasized. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3670 - Computer-Assisted Printed Circuit Board Design

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ET 3620 and ET 3630 or permission of instructor. Utilizes computer software to develop skills in creating schematic and printed circuit board artwork for use in printed circuit board production. Includes plotting, printing, and generating all necessary documents required for fabrication. One hour lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4600 - Programmable Logic Controllers

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. Introduction to programmable logic controllers (PLCs). Selection, operation, and troubleshooting. Ladder diagrams and programming of PLC emphasized. One hour lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4660 - Microprocessor Interfacing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ET 3640 and ET 3650 or permission of instructor. Emphasis on interfacing various analog and digital devices to a microcontroller/microprocessor-based system: memory expansion, A/D and D/A, display devices, keyboards and keypads, electromechanical devices, and sensors. PLDs (FPGAs/CPLDs) interfaced to facilitate rapid prototyping of digital system design. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • CSCI 3160 - Introduction to Assembly Language

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CSCI 1170 or equivalent. Computer architecture and assembly language. Major emphasis on addressing techniques, macros, and program segmentation and linkage.

 

  • PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I  0 credit hours  (Nat Sci) AND 

    PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730 or MATH 1910. Required corequisite: PHYS 2011. Web-based discussion class to be taken in conjunction with cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2011. Classical mechanics traditionally covered in a first-semester college physics course. Kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Class time used for discussion of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or MATH 1730 or MATH 1910. Required corequisite: PHYS 2010. Group-oriented problems course taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2010. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2010 discussion class. Covers kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

 

  • PHYS 2020 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics II

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2021. Web-based discussion class taken in conjunction with the cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2021. Fundamentals of optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. Scheduled class time is used for discussions of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams.

  • PHYS 2021 - Physics Problems Laboratory II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2020. Group-oriented problems course to be taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2020. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2020 discussion class. Optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. The skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions.

Choose 6 hours from:

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. HIST 2010 discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. HIST 2020 discusses the era from 1877 to the present. These courses are prerequisite for all advanced courses in American history and satisfy the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020.

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

Subtotal: 33 Hours

 

Senior

 

  • CSCI 3180 - Introduction to Numerical Analysis

    3 credit hours

    (Same as MATH 3180.) Prerequisites: MATH 1920 and either CSCI 1160 or CSCI 1170. Topics include series approximation, finite differences interpolation, summation, numerical differentiation and integration, iteration, curve fitting, systems of equations and matrices, and error analysis.

  • ENGR 3915 - Technical Project Management and Soft Skills

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Project management as sanctioned by the International Project Management Institute and how to assess and boost emotional intelligence or soft skills. Student successfully completing course will earn 20 Professional Development Units (PDUs) issued by the International Project Management Institute.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4915.

  • ET 4610 - Instrumentation and Controls

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ET 3620 and ET 3630. Devices and techniques used in the measurement of physical parameters. Consideration of accuracies and sources of error, identification of typical measurements, sensors and transducers, control stability and response. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4670 - Microprocessor Design

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ET 3640 and ET 4660 or permission of instructor. Advanced microprocessor system design. Emphasis on the design of core CPUs and imbedded components using high-density FPGA/CPLD development boards. Industrial applications of microprocessor-based systems. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ENGR 3920 - Engineering Safety

    3 credit hours

    Safety and health in the manufacturing, construction, and utilities industries, including pertinent laws, codes, regulations, standards, and product liability considerations. Organizational and administrative principles and practices for safety management and safety engineering, accident investigation, safety education, and safety enforcement.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4420 - Industrial Safety.

  • ET 4801 - Computer Engineering Technology  1 to 3 credit hours  (3 credit hours required) 

    ET 4801 - Computer Engineering Technology

    1 to 3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ET 4670; CSCI 3160. All required freshman-, sophomore-, and junior-level courses in all disciplines have to be completed before registering for this course. Engineering situations are solved by experimental means. Student must have experimental approach, gather data, interpret results, and prepare a formal technical written and oral report.

  • ENGR 3970 - Engineering Economy

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Development of capital budgets. Justification of capital projects using time value of money concepts. Replacement analysis. Review of justification of actual capital projects and computer applications. Introduces economic risk assessment and Lean Six Sigma from an economic viewpoint.

    NOTE: This was formerly ET 4970.

  • ET 4630 - Local Area Networks

    3 credit hours

    Provides the necessary foundation experience to understand the design, implementation, and management strategies of local and wide area networks (LAN/WAN). Data Communication Standards and protocol, fundamentals included. Will include lecture, laboratory activities, and a LAN design requirement. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4710 - Professional Development Seminar  1 credit hour credit hours  

    ET 4710 - Professional Development Seminar

    1 credit hour credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior status. Orientation to industrial job opportunities, placement practices, interview techniques, and preparation of application materials (resume, cover letter, and portfolio if warranted). Guest lecturers, films, and student and faculty presentations arranged in seminar fashion. One-hour lecture weekly.

  • ET 4640 - Industrial Electricity

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. AC power theory and circuits for industrial applications, polyphase systems, power factor correction, and transformers. Theory, applications, and selection of motors and generators. Industrial motor control and power transmission. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

Subtotal: 28 Hours