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Environmental Science

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Located squarely at the intersection of science, technology, and the social sciences, careers in Environmental Science span myriad job descriptions and represent an endless array of new, exciting challenges. Depending on their interests, students can pursue the very timely topics of energy generation and conservation, water quality, recycling, solid waste management, and environmental safety, both through addressing specific issues and through environmental engineering design. Housed in the Department of Geosciences, the interdisciplinary Environmental Science program is invaluable in today's world with the numerous envrionmental challenges we face.

To learn more about the Department of Geosciences, check out our full website!


What We're Doing

A job that satisfies...

A job that satisfies...

A student pursuing a degree in Environmental Health and Safety soon realizes one of the real joys of the profession—every day on the job is a day spent making things safer and improving the health and future health of others, be they coworkers, neighbors, or complete strangers. This makes the field satisfying in a way one usually associates with medical occupations. It also makes every day different and every challenge new. “I know that the work I do every day keeps the men and women I work with safe and healthy and able to go home to their families every night,” says Eva Wright, a recent graduate of the program who now works for Antea Group in Seattle, Washington.

Using energy wisely

Using energy wisely

Established in 1999, MTSU's Center for Energy Efficiency (CEE) develops, implements, and advances sound energy management practices for the University and the community. The center provides additional opportunities for students pursuing a concentration in Energy Technology to become involved in projects and initiatives implemented on the campus and beyond. Among its services, the CEE manages the University's recycling program and offers certification seminars, training opportunities, and leadership in achieving energy management and efficiency goals.


Related Media

  • MTSU True Blue Preview: Environmental Science & Technology

    MTSU True Blue Preview: Environmental Science & Technology

 
 
 

The interaction between technology and the environment—and the need to manage it safely—represents a continuously expanding field of career opportunities. Examples include

  • Construction safety manager
  • Development director
  • Ecologist
  • Energy consultant
  • Energy manager
  • Environmental analyst
  • Environmental compliance and sustainability manager
  • Environmental educator
  • Environmental health and safety manager
  • Environmental planner
  • Environmental technologist
  • Hazardous materials administrator
  • Health and safety trainer
  • Occupational health and safety specialist
  • Regulatory compliance and sustainability specialist
  • Risk management engineer
  • Safety consultant
  • Safety inspector
  • Streams and watershed specialis

Employers of MTSU alumni include

  • Alcoa
  • Amazon
  • American Red Cross
  • Arnold Air
  • City of Smyrna
  • Coca Cola
  • EHS lab
  • Firestone
  • Goodrich
  • Johnson Electric
  • Microsoft
  • Middle Tennessee Electric Membership Cooperative
  • Middle Tennessee State University
  • Murfreesboro Water and Sewer
  • Murfreesboro Electric Service
  • Nissan
  • Nucore
  • Rutherford County Government
  • Select Services
  • TVA
  • Vanderbilt Medical
  • Veterans Affairs
  • ViJon

The MTSU Department of Geosciences offers a Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Science as well as a minor degree in Environmental Science. The department also offers a Bachelor of Science degree (and minors) in Geosciences with concentrations in Geology, Earth Science, Earth Science Education, Physical Geography, and Geospatial Analysis.

For complete curriculum details, click on the REQUIREMENTS button to the right.

Requirements for Environmental Science minor

The minor in Environmental Science and Technology consists of 15 semester hours of courses chosen from the concentrations including EST 2810. At least 9 hours must be at the upper-division level.

Required Course (3 hours)

Elective (12 hours)

  • 12 hours of courses chosen from the various concentrations; at least 9 hours must be upper-division

Environmental Science, B.S.

Geosciences 
Racha El Kadiri, program coordinator
615-494-7641

Racha.ElKadiri@mtsu.edu

The Environmental Science major is an interdisciplinary degree that integrates knowledge from various scientific fields. It features a strong foundation in the geosciences with support courses from chemistry, physics, biology, and math. Coursework includes such topics as environmental issues and impacts, energy resources and recovery, climate and climate change, and geographic information systems.

Students will find career opportunities within both the private and public sector. Typical employment opportunities exist in various local, regional, and national government agencies, and as environmental consultants in air and water quality oversight, pollution control and mitigation, environmental analysis and resource assessment, and hazardous and sanitary waste management.

The degree program includes a capstone experience with opportunities for academic research, study abroad, field courses to a variety of locations, or an internship in local government or industry. Students can choose the best fit for their career goals with the guidance of their faculty mentor.

Academic Map

Following is a printable, suggested four-year schedule of courses:

Environmental Science, B.S., Academic Map 

Degree Requirements

General Education41 hours
Major Requirements29-30 hours*
Math/Science Cognate24 hours*
Capstone Experience6-8 hours
ES Major Supporting Coursework20-24 hours
Electives0-8 hours
TOTAL120 hours

*This program requires courses that can also fulfill requirements of the General Education curriculum. If program requirements are also used to fulfill General Education requirements, the number of elective hours will increase.

General Education (41 hours)

General Education requirements (shown in curricular listings below) include courses in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences.

The following courses required by the program meet General Education requirements:

Major Requirements (29-30 hours)

  • ENVS 2810 - Introduction to Environmental Science

    3 credit hours

    The technical, economic, and political aspects of environmental science. Introduces specific problems dealing with many pollution issues. An overview of energy production processes and climate-related impacts, industrial and agricultural pollution problems, air, noise, solid and hazardous wastes, along with economic and environmental concerns.

  • GEOL 3030 - Geoscience of Energy Resources

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041 or PGEO 1030. Geoscience aspects of energy resources and their impact on the environment. Topics include occurrence, exploration, development, and reclamation, as well as historical trends. Three hours lecture per week.  

  • GEOL 3060 - Computer Methods in Geology

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041 and GEOL 1050; major or minor in Geology/Earth Science. Extensive use of personal computers for processing field data, map contouring, geologic reports and illustrations, lettering and cartography, image processing, geologic databases, and digital maps. Brief treatment of classical cartography. Four to five hours lecture/laboratory per week.

  • PGEO 4000 - Climatology and Climate Change

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PGEO 1030 or GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041. Non-mathematical introduction to the causes and patterns of global climates and in-depth analysis of climate change, including paleoclimatology and recent global cooling and warming trends, their natural and human-induced causes, potential future trends, human and environmental adaptation, and mitigation including geoengineering.

  • PGEO 4020 - Environmental Issues, Impacts, and Sustainability

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PGEO 1030 or GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041. Examines the geographic aspects of how locations affect such modern issues of air and water pollution, hazardous waste, climate change, and food production. Provides an overview of the modern environmental concerns, their causes, consequences, and factors needing to be examined in order to gain an understanding of these problems.

  • PGEO 4530 - Geographic Information Systems

    3 credit hours

    Lecture and laboratory work relative to computer-manipulated geographic data base. Laboratory work will involve experience in practical application of a geographic information system (GIS) to problem solving.

 

  • GEOL 1040 - Physical Geology  4 credit hours  
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    GEOL 1040 - Physical Geology

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: GEOL 1041. The origin, composition, and structure of the solid earth: rock-forming minerals; igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks; earthquakes and plate tectonics; surface processes; geologic time. Identification and description of minerals and rocks in hand sample. Use of topographic and geologic maps. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

 

  • GEOL 4120 - Environmental Geology  4 credit hours  
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    GEOL 4120 - Environmental Geology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041 or consent of instructor. Application of geologic information to minimize possible environmental degradation and maximize utilization of resources in the natural and modified environment; local examples and field trips. Topics include engineering properties of earth materials, natural hazard prediction and reduction, water supply, solid and hazardous wastes, mineral resources, global change, land-use planning, environmental impact analysis. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

  • GEOL 4130 - Hydrogeology  5 credit hours  

    GEOL 4130 - Hydrogeology

    5 credit hours

    Prerequisites: MATH 1720 or MATH 1730; GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041. Basic processes and measurement of the hydrologic cycle, including precipitation, evaporation, surface runoff, stream flow, soil moisture, and ground water. Emphasis on ground water including geology of occurrence, principles of flow, conceptual models of regional flow, chemistry and quality, well hydraulics, aquifer characteristics, resource development, detection of pollutants, and contaminant transport. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

 

  • GEOL 3010 - Oceanography  3 credit hours  
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    GEOL 3010 - Oceanography

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040/GEOL 1041 or PGEO 1030. Physiography, structures, and sediments of the ocean floor; coastal and oceanic environments; and the nature of sea water, currents, waves, and tides. Geological processes, geophysical studies, and oceanographic instrumentation discussed.

  • PGEO 4010 - Biogeography  3 credit hours  

    PGEO 4010 - Biogeography

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PGEO 1030 or GEOL 1030/ GEOL 1031 or GEOL 1040 GEOL 1041. Examines the science of biogeography, geographic principles, and foundations of biogeography. Topics include patterns of biodiversity, ecological biogeography, specialization and extinction forces, and the frontiers of biogeography.

Math/Science Cognate (24 hours)

NOTE: BIOL/CHEM/MATH/PHYS may also count in General Education area. Students must complete 16 hours in BIOL/CHEM/PHYS including a two-term sequence in one discipline.

  • CSCI 1170 - Computer Science I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 or MATH 1810 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. The first of a two-semester sequence using a high-level language; language constructs and simple data structures such as arrays and strings. Emphasis on problem solving using the language and principles of structured software development. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hour.

 

  • BIOL 1110 - General Biology I  4 credit hours  
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    BIOL 1110 - General Biology I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with C- or better of MATH ACT of 19 or higher. Corequisite: BIOL 1111. Primarily for Biology majors and minors and other science-oriented students. Biological principles and processes, including introduction to the nature of science, cells (structure, function, metabolism, division), genetics, evolution, viruses, bacteria, protists, and fungi. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory. While BIOL 1110 can be used to fulfill half the 8-hour General Education requirement for Natural Sciences, it is the first semester of a two-semester sequence primarily designed for science majors. TBR Common Course: BIOL 1110

 

  • CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I  4 credit hours  
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    CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: High school chemistry. Corequisite: CHEM 1111. Fundamental concepts of atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometric relationships, periodic properties of the elements, thermochemistry, and properties of gases. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory. TBR Common Course: CHEM 1110

 

  • PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I  0 credit hours  
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    PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710, MATH 1730, MATH 1810, or MATH 1910 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Required corequisite: PHYS 2011. Web-based discussion class to be taken in conjunction with cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2011. Classical mechanics traditionally covered in a first-semester college physics course. Kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Class time used for discussion of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams. TBR Common Course: PHYS 2010

  • PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710, MATH 1730, MATH 1810, or MATH 1910 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Required corequisite: PHYS 2010. Group-oriented problems course taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2010. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2010 discussion class. Covers kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions. TBR Common Course: PHYS 2011

 

  • MATH 1730 - Pre-Calculus  4 credit hours  
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    OR 

    MATH 1730 - Pre-Calculus

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 or successful completion of high school precalculus course. An integrated and rigorous study of the algebra and trigonometry needed to successfully attempt calculus. Emphasis on functions, their analysis and their applications. Level of algebraic sophistication developed above that found in MATH 1710. Topics include exponentials and logarithms, analysis of graphs, and word problems. Graphing calculator required. TBR Common Course: MATH 1730

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or satisfactory score on Calculus placement test. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required. TBR Common Course: MATH 1910

 

  • BIOL 1120 - General Biology II  4 credit hours  
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    BIOL 1120 - General Biology II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111. Corequisite: BIOL 1121. Primarily for Biology majors and minors and other science-oriented students. Survey of plants and animals emphasizing evolution, structure, function, reproduction, growth, and ecology. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory. TBR Common Course: BIOL 1120

OR

  • CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II  4 credit hours  
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    CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Corequisite: CHEM 1121. Chemical equilibrium, solid and liquid states of matter, chemistry of acids and bases, principles of chemical kinetics, precipitation reactions, elementary thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory. TBR Common Course: CHEM 1120

OR

  • PHYS 2020 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics II  0 credit hours  
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    PHYS 2020 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics II

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2021. Web-based discussion class taken in conjunction with the cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2021. Fundamentals of optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. Scheduled class time is used for discussions of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams. TBR Common Course: PHYS 2020

  • PHYS 2021 - Physics Problems Laboratory II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2020. Group-oriented problems course to be taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2020. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2020 discussion class. Optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. The skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions. TBR Common Course: PHYS 2021

Capstone Experience Courses (6-8 hours)

After earning 90 credit hours toward the Environmental Science program, students must complete a capstone experience including at least 6-8 upper-division credit hours from the courses below. The capstone experience must be approved by the Environmental Science faculty mentor.

Internship

  • BIOL 3200 - Internship in Biology  2 to 4 credit hours  

    BIOL 3200 - Internship in Biology

    2 to 4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 3250/BIOL 3251; permission of department. Practical experience for students in a professional setting.

  • CSCI 4910 - Computer Science Internship

    1 to 6 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CSCI 3110. Must have completed at least 30 semester hours with two semesters at MTSU; must have taken at least two computer science courses at MTSU; minimum overall average of 2.75 and 3.00 in computer science. Employment experience in a computer-related function in a firm, governmental agency, etc. Must be approved by the department.

  • CIM 3300 - Concrete Industry Internship

    1 to 9 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Permission of department. Opportunity for students to gain supervised, practical work experience in their particular field of interest within the concrete industry. The student will be evaluated by his/her supervisor, and a final report will be submitted by the student detailing the internship experience.

  • GEOL 4571 - Internship in Geology

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Major or minor in geology; 15 hours of geology/geography with junior or senior standing; permission of employer and department. Practical experience for students in a professional setting relating to geologic work. After completion of one internship, 4571 or GEOL 4572, the other may be taken (total of six credits).

  • GEOL 4572 - Internship in Geology

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Major or minor in geology; 15 hours of geology/geography with junior or senior standing; permission of employer and department. Practical experience for students in a professional setting relating to geologic work. After completion of one internship, GEOL 4571 or 4572, the other may be taken (total of six credits).

  • PGEO 4571 - Internship in Physical Geography

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Permission of department; major or minor in geography. Practical experience for students in a professional setting relating to geographic work. Counted as a free elective, not part of major or minor requirements. After completion of one internship, 4571 or GEOG 4572, the other may be taken (total of 6 credits).

  • PLSO 4680 - Internship in Plant and Soil Science

    3 to 6 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Approval of instructor. Practical experience in a specific area of agronomy, horticulture, or soils. Classroom material related to practical application. NOT OPEN TO STUDENTS WHO HAVE RECEIVED CREDIT FROM ANOTHER SCHOOL INTERNSHIP.

Field Course

  • GEOL 3401 - Field Course  4 credit hours  

    GEOL 3401 - Field Course

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Permission of department. Supervised study in some geological area preceded by classroom preview and concluded by a time of evaluation. Emphasis on the natural and physical elements of the environment, with special attention directed toward the geomorphology and geology of specific areas. For fees and specific credit, consult the director, division of geology.

  • GEOL 3402 - Field Course  4 credit hours  

    GEOL 3402 - Field Course

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Permission of department. Supervised study in some geological area preceded by classroom preview and concluded by a time of evaluation. Emphasis on the natural and physical elements of the environment, with special attention directed toward the geomorphology and geology of specific areas. For fees and specific credit, consult the director, division of geology.

  • PGEO 3401 - Field Studies in Physical Geography

    4 credit hours

    Supervised study in some geographical area, preceded by classroom preview and concluded by a time of evaluation. Emphasis on natural and cultural elements of the environment with special attention directed toward the pattern of human occupancy. For fees and specific credit, consult the instructor.

  • ANTH 4950 - Archaeological Field School

    3 to 6 credit hours

    Course may be taken for three to six credits after consultation with instructor. The basic techniques of archaeology and paleoecology through participation in actual excavation and laboratory work.

Undergraduate Research

  • AGRI 4910 - Problems in Agriculture  1 to 6 credit hours  

    AGRI 4910 - Problems in Agriculture

    1 to 6 credit hours

    Problem or problems selected from one of the major disciplines. May involve conferences with instructor, library work, field study and/or laboratory activity. Students can take from one to three credits with a maximum of three per semester.

  • BIOL 4280 - Undergraduate Research in Biology

    1 to 4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Permission of department. Selection, design, and conduction of projects typically allied with an instructor's research program. May be repeated for a total of twelve credits. Only four credits may count toward the Biology major.

  • CHEM 3880 - Undergraduate Research II

    1 to 4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor; CHEM 2230 recommended. Student research allied with the instructor's research or designed specifically for the particular student. Minimum of three clock-hours work per week required for each credit hour. Summary report or some other form of presentation required. A total of no more than four hours of research credits may be counted toward a major in chemistry. May be repeated for a total of 12 credits.

  • CIM 4200 - Senior Concrete Lab

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CIM 3000 with C or better; senior standing. Opportunity for students to gain in-depth knowledge of the technical aspects of concrete and cement chemistry in a laboratory environment. The student will be evaluated by his/her ability to investigate a concrete situation and resolve the issue with a laboratory project. Graded activities include in-class exercises, written reports, and oral presentations. One hour lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • CSCI 4280 - Undergraduate Research  1 to 4 credit hours  

    CSCI 4280 - Undergraduate Research

    1 to 4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department. Independent investigation of a selected research problem under the guidance of a faculty member resulting in an oral and written report of results. Does not count toward a minor in Computer Science. May be repeated for a maximum of four credits. A maximum of three credits in the major may come from CSCI 3970, 4280, CSCI 4600, and CSCI 4910.

  • ET 4790 - Advanced Problems in Technology

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Completion of all courses in a given area or approval of instructor. For the advanced student who wishes to work on a designated problem in a specific area. Works on an individual problem or project independently under the guidance of an instructor.

  • GEOL 4090 - Problems in Geology  1 to 6 credit hours  

    GEOL 4090 - Problems in Geology

    1 to 6 credit hours

    Prerequisites: A minimum of 12 semester hours of geology (excluding GEOL 1030/GEOL 1031) at least 6 hours of which must be upper division; consent of instructor. A problem-solving course. Includes an independent research-oriented project commensurate with the student's interests and qualifications. May be repeated up to a maximum of 6 hours.

  • PGEO 4280 - Special Topics and Problems in Physical Geography

    1 to 6 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Permission of department. Research participation or guided readings in a particular area or topic appropriate to the student's interest and professional objectives.

Environmental Science Major Supporting Cousework (20-24 hours)

A minimum of 8 hours at 3000 and/or 4000 level. NOTE: Major supporting coursework may not be PGEO or GEOL courses. Advisor and student will need to appropriately manage course selection from this list and verify that prerequisites are met.

  • ANTH 3310 - Biological Anthropology

    3 credit hours

    The origin and development of human life, its primate roots, ecology, and diversity.

  • BIOL 2230 - Microbiology  4 credit hours  

    BIOL 2230 - Microbiology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111 and BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121 or BIOL 2010/BIOL 2011 and BIOL 2020/BIOL 2021. Concepts and techniques pertaining to the morphology, physiology, reproduction, isolation, cultivation and identification of microorganisms with particular emphasis on bacteria. Topics include the impact of microorganisms in our daily lives, both adverse and beneficial. Background in General Chemistry is strongly recommended. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • BIOL 3210 - Environmental Microbiology

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 2230/BIOL 2231  and BIOL 3250/BIOL 3251. Corequisite: BIOL 3211. Deals with microorganisms commonly found in air, water, and soil. Two hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • BIOL 3250 - Genetics  4 credit hours  

    BIOL 3250 - Genetics

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111 and  BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121. Corequisite: BIOL 3251. An introductory course in genetics. Surveys and explores the sub-disciplines of genetics, including classical, molecular, and evolutionary genetics. Emphasis on the experiments, techniques, and theories forming the foundation of modern genetic research and its applications. Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory.

  • BIOL 3400 - General Ecology  4 credit hours  

    BIOL 3400 - General Ecology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111, BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121, and CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Corequisite: BIOL 3401. Basic concepts of the ecosystem and community aquatic and terrestrial habitats and population ecology; complemented by field and laboratory activities. Three hours lecture and one-three hour laboratory.

  • BIOL 3500 - Evolution  3 credit hours  

    BIOL 3500 - Evolution

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: BIOL 3250/BIOL 3251. Evolutionary biology for majors. Topics include history of evolutionary thinking, mechanisms of evolution, basic quantitative and population genetics, life-history theory, evolution of sex, correlated responses to selection, speciation, macroevolution, molecular evolution, fossil record and geologic time scale, phylogenic inference, and the emergence of life. Three hours lecture.  

  • BIOL 4090 - Forest Ecology  4 credit hours  

    BIOL 4090 - Forest Ecology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in BIOL 3250/BIOL 3251, BIOL 3400, and BIOL 3500 or permission of instructor. Ecological form and function of forested systems with a particular emphasis on communities of the southeastern U.S. and Tennessee. Topics include dendrology, community assembly and disassembly over time, abiotic and biotic drivers of forest community succession, phylogeography and biogeography, and threats and sustainable practices. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • BIOL 4140 - Invertebrate Zoology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: BIOL 3250/BIOL 3251. Corequisite: BIOL 4141. Morphology, classification, evolution, life histories, and economic importance of invertebrate phyla. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • BIOL 4180 - Vertebrate Zoology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: BIOL 3250/BIOL 3251. Corequisite: BIOL 4181. Structure, life history, and classification of fish, amphibians, and mammals. Local representatives emphasized. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • BIOL 4220 - Ichthyology  4 credit hours  

    BIOL 4220 - Ichthyology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: BIOL 3250 BIOL 3251. Corequisite: BIOL 4221. The morphology, physiology, taxonomy, and ecology of fishes. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • BIOL 4420 - Plant Ecology and Evolution

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111, BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121, and BIOL 3250/BIOL 3251 (or permission of department). Major themes in the ecology and evolution of plants. Topics include how plants sense, respond, and adapt to their environment, life history, species, and patterns of diversity and abundance of plants. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • BIOL 4500 - Plant Physiology  4 credit hours  

    BIOL 4500 - Plant Physiology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 3250/BIOL 3251 and CHEM 2030/CHEM 2031 or CHEM 3010/CHEM 3011. Plant growth, development, and metabolism at the cellular and whole plant levels. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • BIOL 4570 - Principles of Toxicology

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111, BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121,  CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111, CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121, and CHEM 3010/CHEM 3011. Corequisite: BIOL 4571. Study of adverse effects of chemical agents on living organisms; current toxicological techniques used in the laboratory. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • BIOL 4580 - Marine Biology  4 credit hours  

    BIOL 4580 - Marine Biology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: BIOL 3250 BIOL 3251, CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111, and CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121. Corequisite: BIOL 4581. Introduction to the biological, chemical, and physical characteristics of major marine environments and their associated flora and fauna. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory.

  • BIOL 4590 - Principles of Environmental Toxicology

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111, BIOL 1120/BIOL 1121, CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111, CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121, and CHEM 3010/CHEM 3011. Ecological effects of chemicals in the environment and techniques currently utilized to assess these effects. Lab includes current environmental assessment techniques, including biomonitoring. Six hours lecture/laboratory.

  • BIOL 4760 - Introduction to Bioinformatics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: BIOL 3250/BIOL 3251 and CSCI 1170 or consent of instructor. Application of computer science to biological questions. Specifically applies to the computational aspects of data gathering, processing, storage, analysis, and visualization methods for use in revising and testing biological hypotheses. Students should have a strong background in either computer science or biology, be willing to learn about the other field in an accelerated fashion, and be willing to work cooperatively as part of an interdisciplinary team. Four hours of lecture/problem-solving per week.

  • CCM 3500 - Land Surveying  3 credit hours  

    CCM 3500 - Land Surveying

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Completion of program math requirements. Examines surveying operations such as horizontal measurements, differential leveling, transverse loop calculations, layout, topographic mapping, and slope staking for roads and utilities in subdivisions. Surveying instruments used include automatic level, one man laser, theodolite, EDM and drone technology. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory. 

  • CHEM 2230 - Quantitative Analysis

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121 with minimum grade of C- (or equivalent course). Corequisite: CHEM 2231 recommended but not required. Gravimetric, volumetric, optical, and electrochemical analysis with examples from clinical chemistry, water pollution chemistry, occupational health and safety, and industrial chemistry. Three hours lecture.

  • CHEM 2231 - Quantitative Analysis Lab

    2 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in CHEM 1120 or equivalent course. Corequisite: CHEM 2230 recommended, but not required. Laboratory course in classical wet chemical analysis; two three-hour laboratory periods per week.

  • CHEM 3010 - Organic Chemistry I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121 or equivalent. Corequisite: CHEM 3011. Types of carbon compounds, their nomenclature, reactions, and physical properties. Three hours lecture.

  • CHEM 3011 - Organic Chemistry I Lab

    1 credit hour

    Corequisite: CHEM 3010. Laboratory course introducing techniques in organic chemistry, including spectroscopy. One three hour laboratory.

  • CHEM 4400 - Inorganic Chemistry I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CHEM 1120 or equivalent; CHEM 3010 recommended. The basic concepts and theories of inorganic chemistry and how these are used to predict and understand the physical and chemical properties of compounds of the elements other than carbon. Chemistry of ions of the elements as it takes place in water, in solid-state salts, and in complexes, along with the chemistry of a selection of representative inorganic and organometallic molecules.

  • CHEM 4410 - Inorganic Chemistry II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CHEM 3010 and CHEM 4400; corequisite: CHEM 4360/CHEM 4361 recommended.  Atomic theory for chemical periodicity; symmetry and group theory; molecular orbital theory; coordination, organometallics.

  • CHEM 4600 - Introduction to Environmental Chemistry

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121 and 8 hours of BIOL and/or CHEM beyond the freshman level; junior or senior standing. Introduces major environmental issues including climate change, water quality, air pollution, landfills, hazardous wastes, fossil fuels, and alternative energy. The quality of environment and the changes in the environment due to contamination explored. Three hours lecture.

  • CHEM 4610 - Environmental Chemistry

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CHEM 1120/CHEM 1121, CHEM 2030/CHEM 2031 or CHEM 3010/CHEM 3011, 8 hours of upper-division biology or chemistry, and junior or senior standing. Fundamental chemical principles applied to the fate and behavior of environmental contaminants in soil-water environments. Important toxins explored and their movement and occurrence in ecosystems explained based on chemical and physical parameters. Topics will include pesticides, dioxin, mercury, and bioaccumulation. Three hours lecture.

  • CMT 3000 - Commercial Construction and Materials

    3 credit hours

    Blueprint reading, commercial construction materials and equipment, commercial construction systems, new materials and procedures, and fundamentals essential to knowledge of the commercial construction field. Lecture, field observations, and site/or plant visits required.

  • CMT 3150 - Residential Building Construction and Materials I

    3 credit hours

    Provides an introduction to construction documents, building materials, components, systems, construction equipment, and methods of construction. Examines materials and methods with regard to design, specifications, assembly, quality assurance standards, and sustainable building practices.

  • CMT 3180 - Construction and Materials II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. Provides an advanced study of building materials, systems, product specifications, testing, standards and inspections, and construction methods. Sustainable building practices, efficiency standards, and structural load calculations also examined.

  • CMT 3195 - Sustainable Construction

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. Introduces current green building technologies and practices, LEED (Leadership in Energy Environmental Design), and NAHB (National Association of Home Builders) Green Building Guidelines. Examines the environmental impact of the building industry and strategies for mitigating environmental impacts by the use of green technologies. 

  • CMT 3210 - Residential Codes, Regulations, Specifications, and Plan Reading

    3 credit hours

    Examines building codes, regulations, and specifications in construction and the role of building and quality control standards, the regulatory environment, and specifications for designing, estimating, and building construction. 

  • ENGR 1100 - Engineering Fundamentals

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1630, MATH 1730, or MATH 1910. Introduces various engineering fields. Emphasis on problem-solving techniques and the use of mathematics in analyzing technical problems. Topics such as graphical representation of data, estimation, dimensions, units, error estimates, statistics, and team work addressed. Engineering ethics and impact of engineering solutions on society and the environment.

  • ENGR 2100 - Introduction to Engineering Design

    3 credit hours

    Introduction to computer-aided design (CAD) for product design, modeling, and prototyping. Individual use and team-based environment to design and prototype a functional and manufacturable marketable product. Application to design, manufacturing, and analysis using geometric tolerancing and dimensioning. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ENGR 2110 - Statics  3 credit hours  

    ENGR 2110 - Statics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGR 1100, MATH 1910, and PHYS 2011 or PHYS 2111. Mechatronics Engineering majors must complete PHYS 2111. Fundamental concepts and conditions of static equilibrium; their application to systems of forces and couples acting on rigid bodies; and the calculation of centers of gravity, centroids, and moments of inertia.

  • ENGR 2120 - Dynamics  3 credit hours  

    ENGR 2120 - Dynamics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGR 2110 and MATH 1920. Kinematics of particles in rectilinear and curvilinear motions. Kinetics of particles, Newton's second law, energy and momentum methods. Systems of particles, Kinematics and plane motion of rigid bodies, forces and accelerations, energy and momentum methods. Introduction to mechanical vibrations.

  • ENGR 2130 - Electrical Circuit Analysis I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGR 1100, MATH 1910, and PHYS 2121 or PHYS 2111. Mechatronics Engineering majors must complete PHYS 2121. Fundamentals of electrical circuits. Volt-ampere characteristics for circuit elements; independent and dependent sources; Kirchhoff's laws and circuit equations. Source transformations; Thevenlin's and Norton's theorems; superposition. Phasor analysis, impedance calculations, and computation of sinusoidal steady state responses. AC power, maximum power transfer, and three-phase circuits. Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

  • ENGR 2210 - Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Origin and behavior of materials. Classifications of materials. Physical metallurgy-mechanical and physical properties, crystalline structure, imperfections in solids, phase diagrams, failure mechanisms in materials, hardening and tempering, isothermal diagrams. Involves hands-on experiences through lab sessions in the use of metallurgical and mechanical testing equipment. Lecture and laboratory.

  • ENGR 3510 - Electrical Circuit Analysis II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGR 2130 and MATH 3120. Analysis of the RC and RL first-order circuits. Use of Laplace Transform techniques to analyze linear circuits with and without initial conditions. Characterization of circuits based upon impedance, admittance, and transfer function parameters. Fourier series, circuit analysis with Fourier transform, determination of frequency response of circuits, filter design. Lecture.

  • ENGR 3520 - Digital Circuits Fundamentals

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGR 2130 and CSCI 1170. Introduces logic design with emphasis on practical design techniques and circuit implementation. Topics include Boolean algebra; theory of logic functions; mapping techniques and function minimization; logic equivalent circuits and symbol transformations; transistor-transistor-logic (TTL)/metal oxide semi-conductor (MOS) logic into gate implementations; electrical characteristics; propagation delays; signed number notations and arithmetic. Digital design using random logic and programmable logic devices (FPGAs and CPLDs). Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ENGR 3530 - Electronics and Instrumentation

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGR 3510. Introduces use and analysis of electronic circuits and input mechanism of various sensors, design of analog signal conditioning systems based on the system requirement, as well as understanding the theory and the art of modern instrumentation and measurements (I&M) systems. Topics include BJT and MOSFET circuit model and analysis; operational amplifier; instrumentation amplifier; survey of sensor input mechanisms; analog signal conditioning and sensor application; measurement system architecture; errors in measurement; standard used in measurement. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ENGR 3540 - Introduction to Feedback Control

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGR 3520, ENGR 3530, MATH 3120. ENGR 3530 may be taken concurrently. Introduces classical feedback control in electrical, mechanical, mechatronics, and other continuous-time dynamic systems. Discusses how to model, evaluate, and design SISO and linear control systems using differential equations, transfer function, root locus, and frequency response methods. Hands-on experiments involving Matlab, Labview, transducers (sensors), and actuators (motors) used to complement the theoretical aspects of the course. Embedded control also introduced. Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory.

  • ENGR 3550 - Fluid Mechanics  3 credit hours  

    ENGR 3550 - Fluid Mechanics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGR 2120 and MATH 3110. Continuum, velocity field, fluid statics, manometers, basic conservation laws for systems and control volumes, dimensional analysis. Euler and Bernoulli equations, viscous flows, boundary layers, flow in channels and around submerged bodies, one-dimensional gas dynamics, turbo-machinery. Applications in hydraulic, pneumatic, and fluidics discussed. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ENGR 3560 - Mechanics of Materials

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGR 2210, ENGR 2110, and MATH 1920. Plane stress, plane strain, and stress-strain laws. Application of stress and deformation analysis to members subjected to centric, torsional, flexural, and combined loading. Introduces theories of failure, buckling, and energy methods.

  • ENGR 3915 - Technical Project Management and Soft Skills

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Project management as sanctioned by the International Project Management Institute and how to assess and boost emotional intelligence or soft skills. Student successfully completing course will earn 20 Professional Development Units (PDUs) issued by the International Project Management Institute.

  • ENGR 3920 - Engineering Safety

    3 credit hours

    Safety and health in the manufacturing, construction, and utilities industries, including pertinent laws, codes, regulations, standards, and product liability considerations. Organizational and administrative principles and practices for safety management and safety engineering, accident investigation, safety education, and safety enforcement.

  • ENGR 3970 - Engineering Economy

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Development of capital budgets. Justification of capital projects using time value of money concepts. Replacement analysis. Review of justification of actual capital projects and computer applications. Introduces economic risk assessment and Lean Six Sigma from an economic viewpoint.

  • ET 2310 - Computer-Assisted Drafting and Design I

    3 credit hours

    Covers basic technical drawing/sketching and drafting concepts using personal computers, plotters, and appropriate CAD software. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.  

  • ET 3601 - Electrical Circuit Analysis I

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGR 1100 and MATH 1910. Fundamentals of electrical circuits. Addresses basic circuit components and quantities. Emphasis on DC circuit calculations and theorems. Uses lab equipment to build and test DC circuits. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3602 - Electrical Circuit Analysis II

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3601 and MATH 1910. Addresses basic circuit components and quantities of AC circuits. Introduces three-phase circuits and transformers. Emphasis on AC circuit calculations and theorems. Uses lab equipment to build and test AC circuits. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3610 - Introduction to Electricity and Electronics

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 or MATH 1730. Orientation to direct current, alternating current, magnetism, filters, and semiconductor devices. Rectifier-filters and basic transistor amplifiers are also examined as representative electronic circuits. Use of meters, oscilloscopes, and other test instruments are stressed in the laboratory. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3630 - Electronics  3 credit hours  

    ET 3630 - Electronics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3602 or permission of instructor. Introduction to analog electronics. Defines basic parameters and theory of operation of discrete semiconductor devices. Introduces fundamentals of electronic circuits analysis and design. Applications illustrate use and laboratory projects provide hands-on experience. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3640 - Digital Circuits Design

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3620; corequisite: ET 3630 or permission of instructor. In-depth study of sequential circuit analysis and design that includes sate machine design. Emphasis on the use of available development boards using both FPGAs and CPLDs and their respective CAD tools. PLDs programmed using latest relative CAD systems. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3650 - Introduction to Microprocessors

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: CSCI 1170 and ET 3620. Covers architecture of microcontrollers and microprocessor-based systems and their related components. Machine language programming extensively used to solve problems and demonstrate the relationship of the microprocessor and its supporting peripherals. Basic microcomputer architecture also emphasized. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 3810 - Engineering Thermodynamics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGR 1100; PHYS 2010/PHYS 2011 or PHYS 2110/PHYS 2111; MATH 1910. Basic concepts of engineering thermodynamics, properties and thermodynamic states, work, heat, first law, second law, entropy, ideal gases, and analysis of conventional power and refrigeration systems.

  • ET 3860 - Strength of Materials

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGR 2110. The mechanics of materials emphasizing the analysis and design of statically determinate beams, columns, and structural members in torsion and application of the three moment equations to statically indeterminate beams.

  • ET 4450 - Industrial Hygiene  3 credit hours  

    ET 4450 - Industrial Hygiene

    3 credit hours

    An introduction to industrial or occupational hygiene--that science and art devoted to the anticipation, recognition, evaluation, and control of those environmental factors or stresses, arising in or from the workplace, which may cause sickness, impaired health and well-being, or significant discomfort and inefficiency among workers or citizens of the community.

  • ET 4815 - Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ET 3810 or permission of instructor. Design and operation of heat and mass transfer systems which produce the needed environments for manufacturing operations, industrial processes, and human comfort. Systems that use mechanical equipment such as pumps, blowers, fans, compressors, and heat exchanges found in fields such as air conditioning, low temperature metallurgy, food preservation, chemical processing, and industrial manufacturing covered. Three hours lecture.

  • ET 4830 - Vibration  3 credit hours  

    ET 4830 - Vibration

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGR 2120. Provides a broad-based background in vibration analysis and introduces present practices. Topics include free, damped, and forced vibrations with one degree of freedom; vibration isolation; free vibration with two degrees of freedom; and introduction to matrix formulation. Three hours lecture.

  • ET 4850 - Fluid Power  3 credit hours  

    ET 4850 - Fluid Power

    3 credit hours

    Systems and the basic components that make up these systems, including hydraulic, pneumatic, and fluidic. Emphasis on understanding the language and graphic symbols associated with fluid power, the performance characteristics of system components, and problem solving. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • ET 4860 - Robotics  3 credit hours  

    ET 4860 - Robotics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: MATH 1910; CSCI (3 hours). Fundamentals of robots. Types of robots, types of controls, the prime movers, the application of robots in the industrial environment, and problem solving. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory.

  • GEOG 3720 - Cultural Ecology  3 credit hours  

    GEOG 3720 - Cultural Ecology

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: 3 hours anthropology or geography. Comparison of ecological systems utilized by tribal, peasant, and industrialized peoples of the world. Special attention paid to the theoretical approaches examining the interface of the environment and culture, the evolution of modes of subsistence, and contemporary development and indigenous people. (Offered upon sufficient demand)

  • GEOG 4340 - Historical Geography

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: GEOG 2000 or permission of instructor. The changing human geography of the United States during four centuries of settlement and development. Emphasis on changing population patterns as well as patterns of urban and rural settlement. (Spring odd-numbered years)

  • GEOG 4370 - Urban Geographies: Key Trends, Problems, and Solutions

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: Junior standing. Explores different geographies of cities through contemporary socioeconomic processes that shape urban development. Cityscapes of North America and abroad surveyed to determine how cultural, economics, globalization, infrastructure, race, geography, and policy influence urban growth. Global networks and associations emphasized. (Fall even-numbered years)

  • GEOG 4550 - Global Issues  3 credit hours  

    GEOG 4550 - Global Issues

    3 credit hours

    An examination of current global issues in the context of their geographic environment. Emphasis on geographic factors impacting those issues. Topics examined vary from year to year. (Spring even-numbered years)

  • GS 4150 - Ecotourism, Geotourism, and Sustainable Development

    3 credit hours

    In-depth examination of ecotourism (low-impact study and travel), geotourism (human engagement with abiotic resources), and sustainable development (interaction with and preservation of the natural environment). Examines the role humans play in interpretation and preservation of our natural and cultural surroundings from local, regional, and global perspectives. Requires field component(s). (Offered upon sufficient demand)

  • HLTH 3260 - Environmental Health

    3 credit hours

    Covers influences of the physical and social environment on health including definitions of toxicology, risk assessment and management, occupational health, and the role of social justice and environmental regulations on health.

  • HSC 4460 - Global Topics in Human Sciences

    3 credit hours

    Globalization, world economics, and global consumer trends relative to Human Sciences. Sustainability and social responsibility provide a framework for the study of the cultural, commercial, economics, and aesthetic aspects of consumerism.

  • MATH 1530 - Applied Statistics

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra and a Math Enhanced ACT 19 or greater or equivalent. Descriptive statistics, probability, and statistical inference. The inference unit covers means, proportions, and variances for one and two samples, and topics from one-way ANOVA, regression and correlation analysis, chi-square analysis, and nonparametrics. TBR Common Course: MATH 1530

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or satisfactory score on Calculus placement test. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required. TBR Common Course: MATH 1910

  • PHIL 3340 - Environmental Ethics

    3 credit hours

    Examines the relation of humans to the rest of nature, clarifying the relevant ethical issues and exploring from various perspectives their application to present and future ecological concerns.

  • PLSO 3340 - Fundamentals of Soil Science

    3 credit hours

    Introduces soil science with emphasis placed on soil physical, biological, and chemical properties. Relates soil conditions to land use applications, plant growth, and environmental quality. Lecture/Lab.

  • PLSO 3350 - Soil Fertility and Fertilizer

    3 credit hours

    Fundamentals of managing plant nutrients in soils for crop, horticulture, and other plant production. Nutrient requirements, nutrient availability in soils, soil acidity and liming, organic and inorganic fertilizers, and environmental effects of fertilizers. Lecture/Lab.

  • PLSO 3360 - Irrigation and Drainage

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PLSO 3340. Comparative evaluation and interpretation of irrigation and drainage systems; water supply development; interrelationships of the environment and plants; scheduling irrigation; examination of economic and legal factors. Lecture/lab.

  • PLSO 3370 - Soil Analysis  3 credit hours  

    PLSO 3370 - Soil Analysis

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PLSO 3340. Analysis of soils in laboratory. Lecture/lab.

  • PLSO 4340 - Genesis of Soil Landscapes

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PLSO 3340 or instructor approval. The co-evolution of soil landscapes, important morphological soil properties, and influence of geologic and geomorphic settings on soil development. The role of water in the development of soil horizons. Factors and processes of soil genesis. Lecture/Lab.

  • PLSO 4350 - Soil Survey and Land Use

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PLSO 3340 or instructor approval. Soil properties used to determine the suitability of soils for various uses.Tasks and reports involved in soil survey. Methods of soil evaluation and interpretation. Use of electronic database for land use decisions. Lecture/Lab.

  • PLSO 4370 - Soil and Water Conservation

    3 credit hours

    History of soil conservation/soil problems in ancient civilizations. Conservation practices with respect to topsoil, soil productivity, and fertility. Land management practices for soil and water conservation. Current issues in soil and water conservation and environmental sustainability. Lecture/Lab.

  • PLSO 4500 - Agroecology  3 credit hours  

    PLSO 4500 - Agroecology

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PLSO 1610 or 4 hours of biology. Theories of agroecology; focuses on sustainable agricultural practices and concepts. The impact of specific agricultural technologies and land use practices on the productivity of agricultural ecosystems, environmental quality, and human health. Examines the environmental science and agronomy of both conventional and alternative sustainable practices including benefits and limitations. Lecture/lab.

  • PLSO 4730 - Soil Physical Properties

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: PLSO 3340; MATH 1010, MATH 1530, or MATH 1710; junior or standing level. Study of concepts related to soil physical properties and processes important for crop productivity and environmental quality. Topics include soil water content and energy, water infiltration, transport of solutes, gas, and heat.

Electives (0-8 hours)

Curriculum: Environmental Science

Curricular listings include General Education requirements in Communication, History, Humanities and/or Fine Arts, Mathematics, Natural Sciences, and Social/Behavioral Sciences categories.

Students should consult their advisors each semester to plan their schedules.

Freshman Fall

  • ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing  3 credit hours  
    (Comm)(Comm)  dotslash:(Comm) title:(Comm) 
    (Comm) 

    ENGL 1010 - Expository Writing

    3 credit hours

    The first General Education English course. Emphasis on learning to adapt composing processes to a variety of expository and analytic writing assignments. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

  • Mathematics 3 credit hours (MATH 1530 or MATH 1710 recommended)
  • ENVS 2810 - Introduction to Environmental Science

    3 credit hours

    The technical, economic, and political aspects of environmental science. Introduces specific problems dealing with many pollution issues. An overview of energy production processes and climate-related impacts, industrial and agricultural pollution problems, air, noise, solid and hazardous wastes, along with economic and environmental concerns.

 

  • CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I  4 credit hours  
    (Nat Sci) AND(Nat Sci) AND  dotslash:(Nat Sci) AND title:(Nat Sci) AND 
    (Nat Sci) AND 

    CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: High school chemistry. Corequisite: CHEM 1111. Fundamental concepts of atomic structure, molecular structure and bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometric relationships, periodic properties of the elements, thermochemistry, and properties of gases. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory. TBR Common Course: CHEM 1110

  • CHEM 1111 - General Chemistry I Lab  0 credit hours  
    (Nat Sci)(Nat Sci)  dotslash:(Nat Sci) title:(Nat Sci) 
    (Nat Sci) 

    CHEM 1111 - General Chemistry I Lab

    0 credit hours

    Corequisite: CHEM 1110. TBR Common Course: CHEM 1111

Subtotal: 13 Hours

Freshman Spring

  • ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing  3 credit hours  
    (Comm)(Comm)  dotslash:(Comm) title:(Comm) 
    (Comm) 

    ENGL 1020 - Research and Argumentative Writing

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisite: ENGL 1010. The second General Education English course. Emphasis on analytic and argumentative writing and on locating, organizing, and using library resource materials in the writing. Minimum grade of C- required for credit.

 

  • GEOL 1040 - Physical Geology  4 credit hours  
    ANDAND  dotslash:AND title:AND 
    AND 

    GEOL 1040 - Physical Geology

    4 credit hours

    Corequisite: GEOL 1041. The origin, composition, and structure of the solid earth: rock-forming minerals; igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks; earthquakes and plate tectonics; surface processes; geologic time. Identification and description of minerals and rocks in hand sample. Use of topographic and geologic maps. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

 

  • MATH 1730 - Pre-Calculus  4 credit hours  
    OROR  dotslash:OR title:OR 
    OR 

    MATH 1730 - Pre-Calculus

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 or successful completion of high school precalculus course. An integrated and rigorous study of the algebra and trigonometry needed to successfully attempt calculus. Emphasis on functions, their analysis and their applications. Level of algebraic sophistication developed above that found in MATH 1710. Topics include exponentials and logarithms, analysis of graphs, and word problems. Graphing calculator required. TBR Common Course: MATH 1730

  • MATH 1910 - Calculus I  4 credit hours  

    MATH 1910 - Calculus I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or satisfactory score on Calculus placement test. An introduction to calculus with an emphasis on analysis of functions, multidisciplinary applications of calculus, and theoretical understanding of differentiation and integration. Topics include the definition of the derivative, differentiation techniques, and applications of the derivative. Calculus topics related to trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions also included. Course concludes with the fundamental theorem of calculus; the definition of antidifferentiation and the definite integral; basic applications of integrations; and introductory techniques of integration. Graphing calculator required. TBR Common Course: MATH 1910

 

  • BIOL 1110 - General Biology I  4 credit hours  
    AND(Nat Sci) AND  dotslash:(Nat Sci) AND title:AND 
    (Nat Sci) AND 

    BIOL 1110 - General Biology I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710 with C- or better of MATH ACT of 19 or higher. Corequisite: BIOL 1111. Primarily for Biology majors and minors and other science-oriented students. Biological principles and processes, including introduction to the nature of science, cells (structure, function, metabolism, division), genetics, evolution, viruses, bacteria, protists, and fungi. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory. While BIOL 1110 can be used to fulfill half the 8-hour General Education requirement for Natural Sciences, it is the first semester of a two-semester sequence primarily designed for science majors. TBR Common Course: BIOL 1110

  • BIOL 1111 - General Biology I Lab  0 credit hours  
    Nat Sci(Nat Sci)  dotslash:(Nat Sci) title:Nat Sci 
    (Nat Sci) 

    BIOL 1111 - General Biology I Lab

    0 credit hours

    Corequisite: BIOL 1110. TBR Common Course: BIOL 1111

Subtotal: 15 Hours

Sophomore Fall

  • ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture  3 credit hours  
    (Hum/FA) OR(Hum/FA) OR  dotslash:(Hum/FA) OR title:(Hum/FA) OR 
    (Hum/FA) OR 

    ENGL 2020 - Themes in Literature and Culture

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Traces a specific theme or idea through a number of literary texts that reflect different historical and cultural contexts. Subject will vary.

  • ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature  3 credit hours  
    (Hum/FA) OR(Hum/FA) OR  dotslash:(Hum/FA) OR title:(Hum/FA) OR 
    (Hum/FA) OR 

    ENGL 2030 - The Experience of Literature

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. The reading of a variety of literary types which illuminate themes and experiences common to human existence.

  • HUM 2610 - World Literatures  3 credit hours  
    (Hum/FA)(Hum/FA)  dotslash:(Hum/FA) title:(Hum/FA) 
    (Hum/FA) 

    HUM 2610 - World Literatures

    3 credit hours

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020. Representative works of French, German, and Hispanic authors in English translation. No foreign-language proficiency required. Carries General Education credit.

 

  • CSCI 1170 - Computer Science I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1730 or MATH 1810 with a grade of C or better or Math ACT of 26 or better or Calculus placement test score of 73 or better. The first of a two-semester sequence using a high-level language; language constructs and simple data structures such as arrays and strings. Emphasis on problem solving using the language and principles of structured software development. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hour.

  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours
  • Major (PGEO) course 3 credit hours

Subtotal: 13 Hours

Sophomore Spring

  • PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I  0 credit hours  
    ANDAND  dotslash:AND title:AND 
    AND 

    PHYS 2010 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics I

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710, MATH 1730, MATH 1810, or MATH 1910 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Required corequisite: PHYS 2011. Web-based discussion class to be taken in conjunction with cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2011. Classical mechanics traditionally covered in a first-semester college physics course. Kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Class time used for discussion of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams. TBR Common Course: PHYS 2010

  • PHYS 2011 - Physics Problems Laboratory I

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: MATH 1710, MATH 1730, MATH 1810, or MATH 1910 with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Required corequisite: PHYS 2010. Group-oriented problems course taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2010. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2010 discussion class. Covers kinematics, forces, momentum, angular motion, calorimetry, and sound waves. Skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions. TBR Common Course: PHYS 2011

 

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I  3 credit hours  
    OROR  dotslash:OR title:OR 
    OR 

    HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. Discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020. TBR Common Course: HIST 2010

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II  3 credit hours  
    OROR  dotslash:OR title:OR 
    OR 

    HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. Discusses the era from 1877 to the present. May be used to satisfy one part of the the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020. TBR Common Course: HIST 2020

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History  3 credit hours  
    OROR  dotslash:OR title:OR 
    OR 

    HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement. TBR Common Course: HIST 2030

  • HIST 2040 - Survey African American History I  3 credit hours  
    OROR  dotslash:OR title:OR 
    OR 

    HIST 2040 - Survey African American History I

    3 credit hours

    (Same as AST 2040.) The role of African Americans in establishing and shaping the American nation. Covers their historical development and contributions to American art, music, literature, and religion. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

  • HIST 2050 - Survey African American History II

    3 credit hours

    (Same as AST 2050.) The role of African Americans in shaping the American nation and creating a twentieth-century racial identity. Covers their historical development and examines their contributions to American art, music, literature, and religion. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

 

  • Major (GEOL) course 3 credit hours
  • Major (PGEO) course 3 credit hours

Subtotal: 13 Hours

Junior Fall

  • COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication  3 credit hours  
    (Comm)(Comm)  dotslash:(Comm) title:(Comm) 
    (Comm) 

    COMM 2200 - Fundamentals of Communication

    3 credit hours

    Introduces principles and processes of effective public oral communication including researching, critical thinking, organizing, presenting, listening, and using appropriate language. Counts as part of the General Education Communication requirement. TBR Common Course: COMM 2025

  • Major (GEOL) course 3 credit hours
  • Major supporting courses 7 credit hours

 

  • BIOL 1120 - General Biology II  4 credit hours  
    ANDAND  dotslash:AND title:AND 
    AND 

    BIOL 1120 - General Biology II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: BIOL 1110/BIOL 1111. Corequisite: BIOL 1121. Primarily for Biology majors and minors and other science-oriented students. Survey of plants and animals emphasizing evolution, structure, function, reproduction, growth, and ecology. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory. TBR Common Course: BIOL 1120

OR

  • CHEM 1121 - General Chemistry II Lab  0 credit hours  
    ANDAND  dotslash:AND title:AND 
    AND 

    CHEM 1121 - General Chemistry II Lab

    0 credit hours

    Corequisite: CHEM 1120.TBR Common Course: CHEM 1121

  • CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM 1110/CHEM 1111. Corequisite: CHEM 1121. Chemical equilibrium, solid and liquid states of matter, chemistry of acids and bases, principles of chemical kinetics, precipitation reactions, elementary thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory. TBR Common Course: CHEM 1120

OR

  • PHYS 2020 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics II  0 credit hours  
    ANDAND  dotslash:AND title:AND 
    AND 

    PHYS 2020 - Non-Calculus-Based Physics II

    0 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2021. Web-based discussion class taken in conjunction with the cooperative-learning based problems lab PHYS 2021. Fundamentals of optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. Scheduled class time is used for discussions of the Web-lecture material and for the administration of exams. TBR Common Course: PHYS 2020

  • PHYS 2021 - Physics Problems Laboratory II

    4 credit hours

    Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Required corequisite: PHYS 2020. Group-oriented problems course to be taken in conjunction with the Web-based discussion class PHYS 2020. Students work in groups with the topics presented in the PHYS 2020 discussion class. Optics, modern physics, and electronics traditionally covered in a second-semester college physics course. Reflection and refraction, vision, diffraction effects, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, and analog and digital electronics. The skills associated with the development of experimental investigations including graphical analysis and estimation of uncertainties emphasized. Two two-and-one-half-hour laboratory sessions. TBR Common Course: PHYS 2021

Subtotal: 17 Hours

Junior Spring

  • HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I  3 credit hours  
    OROR  dotslash:OR title:OR 
    OR 

    HIST 2010 - Survey of United States History I

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. Discusses the era from the beginning to 1877. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020. TBR Common Course: HIST 2010

  • HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II  3 credit hours  
    OROR  dotslash:OR title:OR 
    OR 

    HIST 2020 - Survey of United States History II

    3 credit hours

    Survey of the political, economic, social, cultural, and diplomatic phases of American life in its regional, national, and international aspects. Discusses the era from 1877 to the present. May be used to satisfy one part of the the General Education History requirement. HIST 2010 is NOT a prerequisite for HIST 2020. TBR Common Course: HIST 2020

  • HIST 2030 - Tennessee History  3 credit hours  
    OROR  dotslash:OR title:OR 
    OR 

    HIST 2030 - Tennessee History

    3 credit hours

    The role of the state in the development of the nation. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement. TBR Common Course: HIST 2030

  • HIST 2040 - Survey African American History I  3 credit hours  
    OROR  dotslash:OR title:OR 
    OR 

    HIST 2040 - Survey African American History I

    3 credit hours

    (Same as AST 2040.) The role of African Americans in establishing and shaping the American nation. Covers their historical development and contributions to American art, music, literature, and religion. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

  • HIST 2050 - Survey African American History II

    3 credit hours

    (Same as AST 2050.) The role of African Americans in shaping the American nation and creating a twentieth-century racial identity. Covers their historical development and examines their contributions to American art, music, literature, and religion. May be used to satisfy one part of the General Education History requirement.

 

  • Major (GEOL) or (PGEO) course 3 credit hours
  • Major (GEOL) course 4 to 5 credit hours
  • Major (PGEO) course 3 credit hours
  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours

Subtotal: 16-17 Hours

Senior Fall

  • Major supporting courses 10 credit hours
  • Capstone experience 3 to 4 credit hours
  • Humanities and/or Fine Arts 3 credit hours

Subtotal: 16-17 Hours

Senior Spring

  • General elective 2 credit hours
  • Major supporting course 3 credit hours
  • General or major supporting course 4 credit hours
  • Capstone experience 3 to 4 credit hours
  • Social/Behavioral Sciences 3 credit hours

Subtotal: 15-16 Hours

Our adjunct faculty bring outstanding professional experience to our programs. Many are industry leaders with decorated careers and honors. Importantly, they are innovative educators who offer hands-on learning to our students to prepare them to enter and thrive in a dynamic, and oftentimes emerging, industry and professional world. They inspire, instruct, and challenge our students toward academic and professional success.

Environmental Science and Technology

EST 4760 - Seminar in Environmental Science and Technology
1 credit hour

Prerequisite: Permission of department. Student presentations on capstone projects. Incorporates guest speakers, readings, reflective thought, career and job search, and discussions on environmental issues.

EST 4770 - Pollution Control Technology
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: 8 hours each in biology, chemistry, and physics, or consent of instructor. Solid waste and water pollution control technology. Legislative regulations and quality standards, pollution types and sources, detection and analysis instruments, and treatment or abatement principles and practices.

EST 4780 - Air, Solids, and Noise Pollution Technology
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: 8 hours each chemistry, biology, and physics or permission of instructor. Air, noise, solid and hazardous waste pollution technology, including legislative regulations and quality standards: sources, detection, and analysis instrumentation and practices, and treatment and abatement principles, equipment, and practices.

EST 4810 - Energy and the Environment
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: 4 hours chemistry and 3 hours mathematics or consent of instructor. Sources and methods of energy production and classifications of energy usages, with emphasis on usage trends, energy conservation strategies, and alternate energy utilization.

EST 4820 - Solar Building Design
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: 4 hours science and 3 hours mathematics or consent of instructor. Broad introduction to the environmental and economic impact of solar energy for residential and light industrial construction including day lighting, passive solar design, and hot water heating.

EST 4840 - Energy Auditing
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: 4 hours chemistry and 3 hours mathematics or consent of instructor. Types of energy consumption and classifications of energy usages, with emphasis on conservation strategies and total management for residential and industrial plants.

EST 4980 - Environmental Public Health
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: 8 hours college biology and 8 hours college chemistry. Applying the sciences of biology, chemistry, statistics, and environmental engineering to the field of public health. Public health epidemiology and disease control concepts related to the anticipation, recognition, assessment, and control of common public health disease problems.

Contact Information

Racha El Kadiri
Racha.ElKadiri@mtsu.edu
615-494-7641

Who is My Advisor?

Irina Novozhilova
Irina.Novozhilova@mtsu.edu
615-898-5087 | DSB 120

Mailing Address

Department of Geosciences
Middle Tennessee State University
MTSU Box 9
1301 East Main Street
Murfreesboro, TN 37132

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